Topics

Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making the Web Better through more open-source collaboration #wintendev

 

Hi all,

 

The below blog was written by Joe Belfiore, who is now one of the leaders for Windows division at Microsoft. His blog post confirms the rumor we’ve been hearing for the last few days:

https://blogs.windows.com/windowsexperience/2018/12/06/microsoft-edge-making-the-web-better-through-more-open-source-collaboration/#JzQMYwuM6BeHHDRW.97

 

Basically, Microsoft Edge branding will be retained, but the underlying rendering engine will be Chromium. With this move, Edge will be made available to older Windows releases and other platforms. If you’re using Edge on iOS (some of us are), this combination (edge + another rendering engine) should sound familiar, as Edge on iOS uses Edge branding and is powered by Web Kit, the engine used by Safari.

 

As for screen readers, I expect developers to start thinking about testing the new Edge once the preview is released so we can see what needs to be done. Any screen reader that supports Chromium rendering engine in some form should have no trouble with common web browsing scenarios.

 

Cheers,

Joseph

 

Hi,

Also, another big reminder: Chromium and Chrome are two completely different things. Just because a screen reader supports Google Chrome does not mean it’ll automatically support the new Edge, as the new Edge will not only involve Chromium engine, but other user interface changes as well.

Cheers,

Joseph

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Joseph Lee via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 9:24 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making the Web Better through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev

 

Hi all,

 

The below blog was written by Joe Belfiore, who is now one of the leaders for Windows division at Microsoft. His blog post confirms the rumor we’ve been hearing for the last few days:

https://blogs.windows.com/windowsexperience/2018/12/06/microsoft-edge-making-the-web-better-through-more-open-source-collaboration/#JzQMYwuM6BeHHDRW.97

 

Basically, Microsoft Edge branding will be retained, but the underlying rendering engine will be Chromium. With this move, Edge will be made available to older Windows releases and other platforms. If you’re using Edge on iOS (some of us are), this combination (edge + another rendering engine) should sound familiar, as Edge on iOS uses Edge branding and is powered by Web Kit, the engine used by Safari.

 

As for screen readers, I expect developers to start thinking about testing the new Edge once the preview is released so we can see what needs to be done. Any screen reader that supports Chromium rendering engine in some form should have no trouble with common web browsing scenarios.

 

Cheers,

Joseph

Timothy
 

Does anyone know why Microsoft is going with Google's Chromium rather than Mozilla's Gecko for the rendering engine? If we're talking about fostering open-source initiatives, it does seem that, at a glance, Mozilla's philosophy wins out. Whether or not it works in practice is an issue which I'm entirely ignorant of.

I assume it's as simple as Chrome having a higher market share than Firefox, which means that the chromium engine does too, so supporting the most widely used rendering engine (apart from Apple's Webkit) is probably the easiest move from a developer's standpoint.

Timothy

----- Original Message -----
From: Joseph Lee
Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 12:23 PM
Subject: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making the Web Better through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev

Hi all,

 

The below blog was written by Joe Belfiore, who is now one of the leaders for Windows division at Microsoft. His blog post confirms the rumor we’ve been hearing for the last few days:

https://blogs.windows.com/windowsexperience/2018/12/06/microsoft-edge-making-the-web-better-through-more-open-source-collaboration/#JzQMYwuM6BeHHDRW.97

 

Basically, Microsoft Edge branding will be retained, but the underlying rendering engine will be Chromium. With this move, Edge will be made available to older Windows releases and other platforms. If you’re using Edge on iOS (some of us are), this combination (edge + another rendering engine) should sound familiar, as Edge on iOS uses Edge branding and is powered by Web Kit, the engine used by Safari.

 

As for screen readers, I expect developers to start thinking about testing the new Edge once the preview is released so we can see what needs to be done. Any screen reader that supports Chromium rendering engine in some form should have no trouble with common web browsing scenarios.

 

Cheers,

Joseph

 

Hi,

Market share is one metric folks are concerned about, so yes, it might be that. There might be other host of reasons that we don’t know for sure until we get a clearer picture next year.

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Timothy via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 10:12 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making the Web Better through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev

 

Does anyone know why Microsoft is going with Google's Chromium rather than Mozilla's Gecko for the rendering engine? If we're talking about fostering open-source initiatives, it does seem that, at a glance, Mozilla's philosophy wins out. Whether or not it works in practice is an issue which I'm entirely ignorant of.

I assume it's as simple as Chrome having a higher market share than Firefox, which means that the chromium engine does too, so supporting the most widely used rendering engine (apart from Apple's Webkit) is probably the easiest move from a developer's standpoint.

Timothy

----- Original Message -----

From: Joseph Lee

Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 12:23 PM

Subject: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making the Web Better through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev

 

Hi all,

 

The below blog was written by Joe Belfiore, who is now one of the leaders for Windows division at Microsoft. His blog post confirms the rumor we’ve been hearing for the last few days:

https://blogs.windows.com/windowsexperience/2018/12/06/microsoft-edge-making-the-web-better-through-more-open-source-collaboration/#JzQMYwuM6BeHHDRW.97

 

Basically, Microsoft Edge branding will be retained, but the underlying rendering engine will be Chromium. With this move, Edge will be made available to older Windows releases and other platforms. If you’re using Edge on iOS (some of us are), this combination (edge + another rendering engine) should sound familiar, as Edge on iOS uses Edge branding and is powered by Web Kit, the engine used by Safari.

 

As for screen readers, I expect developers to start thinking about testing the new Edge once the preview is released so we can see what needs to be done. Any screen reader that supports Chromium rendering engine in some form should have no trouble with common web browsing scenarios.

 

Cheers,

Joseph

emile
 

I definitely don’t like mozilla.  There seems to have been some deterioration of the program; it is very slow loading compared to what it used to be.  I like Edge but yes, they really need to work on it but personally I think they should continue working ont and get the bugs out.

Emile.

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Joseph Lee
Sent: Thursday, December 06, 2018 12:18 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making the Web Better through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev

 

Hi,

Market share is one metric folks are concerned about, so yes, it might be that. There might be other host of reasons that we don’t know for sure until we get a clearer picture next year.

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Timothy via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 10:12 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making the Web Better through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev

 

Does anyone know why Microsoft is going with Google's Chromium rather than Mozilla's Gecko for the rendering engine? If we're talking about fostering open-source initiatives, it does seem that, at a glance, Mozilla's philosophy wins out. Whether or not it works in practice is an issue which I'm entirely ignorant of.

I assume it's as simple as Chrome having a higher market share than Firefox, which means that the chromium engine does too, so supporting the most widely used rendering engine (apart from Apple's Webkit) is probably the easiest move from a developer's standpoint.

Timothy

----- Original Message -----

From: Joseph Lee

Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 12:23 PM

Subject: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making the Web Better through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev

 

Hi all,

 

The below blog was written by Joe Belfiore, who is now one of the leaders for Windows division at Microsoft. His blog post confirms the rumor we’ve been hearing for the last few days:

https://blogs.windows.com/windowsexperience/2018/12/06/microsoft-edge-making-the-web-better-through-more-open-source-collaboration/#JzQMYwuM6BeHHDRW.97

 

Basically, Microsoft Edge branding will be retained, but the underlying rendering engine will be Chromium. With this move, Edge will be made available to older Windows releases and other platforms. If you’re using Edge on iOS (some of us are), this combination (edge + another rendering engine) should sound familiar, as Edge on iOS uses Edge branding and is powered by Web Kit, the engine used by Safari.

 

As for screen readers, I expect developers to start thinking about testing the new Edge once the preview is released so we can see what needs to be done. Any screen reader that supports Chromium rendering engine in some form should have no trouble with common web browsing scenarios.

 

Cheers,

Joseph

David Moore
 

Hi all!

I do not like Mozilla either!

Waterfox is so fast and easy to use with NVDA and JAWS.

Now, Edge, Narrator works very well in Edge with the 1809 version of Windows 10.

Have a great one,

David Moore

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: emile
Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 2:03 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making the WebBetter through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev

 

I definitely don’t like mozilla.  There seems to have been some deterioration of the program; it is very slow loading compared to what it used to be.  I like Edge but yes, they really need to work on it but personally I think they should continue working ont and get the bugs out.

Emile.

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Joseph Lee
Sent: Thursday, December 06, 2018 12:18 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making the Web Better through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev

 

Hi,

Market share is one metric folks are concerned about, so yes, it might be that. There might be other host of reasons that we don’t know for sure until we get a clearer picture next year.

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Timothy via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 10:12 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making the Web Better through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev

 

Does anyone know why Microsoft is going with Google's Chromium rather than Mozilla's Gecko for the rendering engine? If we're talking about fostering open-source initiatives, it does seem that, at a glance, Mozilla's philosophy wins out. Whether or not it works in practice is an issue which I'm entirely ignorant of.

I assume it's as simple as Chrome having a higher market share than Firefox, which means that the chromium engine does too, so supporting the most widely used rendering engine (apart from Apple's Webkit) is probably the easiest move from a developer's standpoint.

Timothy

----- Original Message -----

From: Joseph Lee

Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 12:23 PM

Subject: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making the Web Better through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev

 

Hi all,

 

The below blog was written by Joe Belfiore, who is now one of the leaders for Windows division at Microsoft. His blog post confirms the rumor we’ve been hearing for the last few days:

https://blogs.windows.com/windowsexperience/2018/12/06/microsoft-edge-making-the-web-better-through-more-open-source-collaboration/#JzQMYwuM6BeHHDRW.97

 

Basically, Microsoft Edge branding will be retained, but the underlying rendering engine will be Chromium. With this move, Edge will be made available to older Windows releases and other platforms. If you’re using Edge on iOS (some of us are), this combination (edge + another rendering engine) should sound familiar, as Edge on iOS uses Edge branding and is powered by Web Kit, the engine used by Safari.

 

As for screen readers, I expect developers to start thinking about testing the new Edge once the preview is released so we can see what needs to be done. Any screen reader that supports Chromium rendering engine in some form should have no trouble with common web browsing scenarios.

 

Cheers,

Joseph

 

Kevin Cussick
 

but still I can't seem to get the option to import from firefox.

On 06/12/2018 22:28, David Moore wrote:
Hi all!
I do not like Mozilla either!
Waterfox is so fast and easy to use with NVDA and JAWS.
Now, Edge, Narrator works very well in Edge with the 1809 version of Windows 10.
Have a great one,
David Moore
                                                                                                                                                                                                                Sent from Mail for Windows 10
From: emile
Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 2:03 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making the WebBetter through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev
I definitely don’t like mozilla.  There seems to have been some deterioration of the program; it is very slow loading compared to what it used to be.  I like Edge but yes, they really need to work on it but personally I think they should continue working ont and get the bugs out.
Emile.
From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Joseph Lee
Sent: Thursday, December 06, 2018 12:18 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making the Web Better through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev
Hi,
Market share is one metric folks are concerned about, so yes, it might be that. There might be other host of reasons that we don’t know for sure until we get a clearer picture next year.
Cheers,
Joseph
From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Timothy via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 10:12 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making the Web Better through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev
Does anyone know why Microsoft is going with Google's Chromium rather than Mozilla's Gecko for the rendering engine? If we're talking about fostering open-source initiatives, it does seem that, at a glance, Mozilla's philosophy wins out. Whether or not it works in practice is an issue which I'm entirely ignorant of.
I assume it's as simple as Chrome having a higher market share than Firefox, which means that the chromium engine does too, so supporting the most widely used rendering engine (apart from Apple's Webkit) is probably the easiest move from a developer's standpoint.
Timothy
----- Original Message -----
From: Joseph Lee
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 12:23 PM
Subject: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making the Web Better through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev
Hi all,
The below blog was written by Joe Belfiore, who is now one of the leaders for Windows division at Microsoft. His blog post confirms the rumor we’ve been hearing for the last few days:
https://blogs.windows.com/windowsexperience/2018/12/06/microsoft-edge-making-the-web-better-through-more-open-source-collaboration/#JzQMYwuM6BeHHDRW.97
Basically, Microsoft Edge branding will be retained, but the underlying rendering engine will be Chromium. With this move, Edge will be made available to older Windows releases and other platforms. If you’re using Edge on iOS (some of us are), this combination (edge + another rendering engine) should sound familiar, as Edge on iOS uses Edge branding and is powered by Web Kit, the engine used by Safari.
As for screen readers, I expect developers to start thinking about testing the new Edge once the preview is released so we can see what needs to be done. Any screen reader that supports Chromium rendering engine in some form should have no trouble with common web browsing scenarios.
Cheers,
Joseph

Don H
 

I just tried to install waterfox and during setup said import from Google Chrome and it did not import anything.

On 12/6/2018 5:05 PM, Kevin Cussick via Groups.Io wrote:
but still I can't seem to get the option to import from firefox.
On 06/12/2018 22:28, David Moore wrote:
Hi all!
I do not like Mozilla either!
Waterfox is so fast and easy to use with NVDA and JAWS.
Now, Edge, Narrator works very well in Edge with the 1809 version of Windows 10.
Have a great one,
David Moore

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: emile
Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 2:03 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making the WebBetter through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev

I definitely don’t like mozilla.  There seems to have been some deterioration of the program; it is very slow loading compared to what it used to be.  I like Edge but yes, they really need to work on it but personally I think they should continue working ont and get the bugs out.
Emile.

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Joseph Lee
Sent: Thursday, December 06, 2018 12:18 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making the Web Better through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev

Hi,
Market share is one metric folks are concerned about, so yes, it might be that. There might be other host of reasons that we don’t know for sure until we get a clearer picture next year.
Cheers,
Joseph

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Timothy via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 10:12 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making the Web Better through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev

Does anyone know why Microsoft is going with Google's Chromium rather than Mozilla's Gecko for the rendering engine? If we're talking about fostering open-source initiatives, it does seem that, at a glance, Mozilla's philosophy wins out. Whether or not it works in practice is an issue which I'm entirely ignorant of.
I assume it's as simple as Chrome having a higher market share than Firefox, which means that the chromium engine does too, so supporting the most widely used rendering engine (apart from Apple's Webkit) is probably the easiest move from a developer's standpoint.
Timothy
----- Original Message -----
From: Joseph Lee
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 12:23 PM
Subject: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making the Web Better through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev

Hi all,

The below blog was written by Joe Belfiore, who is now one of the leaders for Windows division at Microsoft. His blog post confirms the rumor we’ve been hearing for the last few days:
https://blogs.windows.com/windowsexperience/2018/12/06/microsoft-edge-making-the-web-better-through-more-open-source-collaboration/#JzQMYwuM6BeHHDRW.97

Basically, Microsoft Edge branding will be retained, but the underlying rendering engine will be Chromium. With this move, Edge will be made available to older Windows releases and other platforms. If you’re using Edge on iOS (some of us are), this combination (edge + another rendering engine) should sound familiar, as Edge on iOS uses Edge branding and is powered by Web Kit, the engine used by Safari.

As for screen readers, I expect developers to start thinking about testing the new Edge once the preview is released so we can see what needs to be done. Any screen reader that supports Chromium rendering engine in some form should have no trouble with common web browsing scenarios.

Cheers,
Joseph




Blaster
 

Any possibility of Internet Explorer making a comeback? Or is that off
the table?

Blaster

On 12/6/18, David Moore <jesusloves1966@...> wrote:
Hi all!
I do not like Mozilla either!
Waterfox is so fast and easy to use with NVDA and JAWS.
Now, Edge, Narrator works very well in Edge with the 1809 version of Windows
10.
Have a great one,
David Moore


Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: emile
Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 2:03 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making the
WebBetter through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev

I definitely don’t like mozilla. There seems to have been some
deterioration of the program; it is very slow loading compared to what it
used to be. I like Edge but yes, they really need to work on it but
personally I think they should continue working ont and get the bugs out.
Emile.

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Joseph Lee
Sent: Thursday, December 06, 2018 12:18 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making the
Web Better through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev

Hi,
Market share is one metric folks are concerned about, so yes, it might be
that. There might be other host of reasons that we don’t know for sure until
we get a clearer picture next year.
Cheers,
Joseph

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Timothy via
Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 10:12 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making the
Web Better through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev

Does anyone know why Microsoft is going with Google's Chromium rather than
Mozilla's Gecko for the rendering engine? If we're talking about fostering
open-source initiatives, it does seem that, at a glance, Mozilla's
philosophy wins out. Whether or not it works in practice is an issue which
I'm entirely ignorant of.
I assume it's as simple as Chrome having a higher market share than Firefox,
which means that the chromium engine does too, so supporting the most widely
used rendering engine (apart from Apple's Webkit) is probably the easiest
move from a developer's standpoint.
Timothy
----- Original Message -----
From: Joseph Lee
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 12:23 PM
Subject: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making the Web
Better through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev

Hi all,

The below blog was written by Joe Belfiore, who is now one of the leaders
for Windows division at Microsoft. His blog post confirms the rumor we’ve
been hearing for the last few days:
https://blogs.windows.com/windowsexperience/2018/12/06/microsoft-edge-making-the-web-better-through-more-open-source-collaboration/#JzQMYwuM6BeHHDRW.97

Basically, Microsoft Edge branding will be retained, but the underlying
rendering engine will be Chromium. With this move, Edge will be made
available to older Windows releases and other platforms. If you’re using
Edge on iOS (some of us are), this combination (edge + another rendering
engine) should sound familiar, as Edge on iOS uses Edge branding and is
powered by Web Kit, the engine used by Safari.

As for screen readers, I expect developers to start thinking about testing
the new Edge once the preview is released so we can see what needs to be
done. Any screen reader that supports Chromium rendering engine in some form
should have no trouble with common web browsing scenarios.

Cheers,
Joseph





 

Hi,
No, Internet Explorer is in maintenance mode at the moment, so it won't make its appearance on "stage".
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Blaster
Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 6:45 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making the Web Better through more open-source collaboration #wintendev

Any possibility of Internet Explorer making a comeback? Or is that off the table?

Blaster


On 12/6/18, David Moore <jesusloves1966@...> wrote:
Hi all!
I do not like Mozilla either!
Waterfox is so fast and easy to use with NVDA and JAWS.
Now, Edge, Narrator works very well in Edge with the 1809 version of
Windows 10.
Have a great one,
David Moore


Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: emile
Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 2:03 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making
the WebBetter through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev

I definitely don’t like mozilla. There seems to have been some
deterioration of the program; it is very slow loading compared to what
it used to be. I like Edge but yes, they really need to work on it
but personally I think they should continue working ont and get the bugs out.
Emile.

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of
Joseph Lee
Sent: Thursday, December 06, 2018 12:18 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making
the Web Better through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev

Hi,
Market share is one metric folks are concerned about, so yes, it might
be that. There might be other host of reasons that we don’t know for
sure until we get a clearer picture next year.
Cheers,
Joseph

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of
Timothy via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 10:12 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making
the Web Better through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev

Does anyone know why Microsoft is going with Google's Chromium rather
than Mozilla's Gecko for the rendering engine? If we're talking about
fostering open-source initiatives, it does seem that, at a glance,
Mozilla's philosophy wins out. Whether or not it works in practice is
an issue which I'm entirely ignorant of.
I assume it's as simple as Chrome having a higher market share than
Firefox, which means that the chromium engine does too, so supporting
the most widely used rendering engine (apart from Apple's Webkit) is
probably the easiest move from a developer's standpoint.
Timothy
----- Original Message -----
From: Joseph Lee
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 12:23 PM
Subject: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making the
Web Better through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev

Hi all,

The below blog was written by Joe Belfiore, who is now one of the
leaders for Windows division at Microsoft. His blog post confirms the
rumor we’ve been hearing for the last few days:
https://blogs.windows.com/windowsexperience/2018/12/06/microsoft-edge-
making-the-web-better-through-more-open-source-collaboration/#JzQMYwuM
6BeHHDRW.97

Basically, Microsoft Edge branding will be retained, but the
underlying rendering engine will be Chromium. With this move, Edge
will be made available to older Windows releases and other platforms.
If you’re using Edge on iOS (some of us are), this combination (edge +
another rendering
engine) should sound familiar, as Edge on iOS uses Edge branding and
is powered by Web Kit, the engine used by Safari.

As for screen readers, I expect developers to start thinking about
testing the new Edge once the preview is released so we can see what
needs to be done. Any screen reader that supports Chromium rendering
engine in some form should have no trouble with common web browsing scenarios.

Cheers,
Joseph





Maria Reyes
 

So will the Edge iOS app be redesigned? I use a combo of ie and Firefox.

Maria Reyes
blindteky@...
my group: blind-techies+subscribe@groups.io

On Dec 6, 2018, at 9:52 PM, Joseph Lee <@joslee> wrote:

Hi,
No, Internet Explorer is in maintenance mode at the moment, so it won't make its appearance on "stage".
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Blaster
Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 6:45 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making the Web Better through more open-source collaboration #wintendev

Any possibility of Internet Explorer making a comeback? Or is that off the table?

Blaster


On 12/6/18, David Moore <jesusloves1966@...> wrote:
Hi all!
I do not like Mozilla either!
Waterfox is so fast and easy to use with NVDA and JAWS.
Now, Edge, Narrator works very well in Edge with the 1809 version of
Windows 10.
Have a great one,
David Moore


Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: emile
Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 2:03 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making
the WebBetter through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev

I definitely don’t like mozilla. There seems to have been some
deterioration of the program; it is very slow loading compared to what
it used to be. I like Edge but yes, they really need to work on it
but personally I think they should continue working ont and get the bugs out.
Emile.

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of
Joseph Lee
Sent: Thursday, December 06, 2018 12:18 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making
the Web Better through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev

Hi,
Market share is one metric folks are concerned about, so yes, it might
be that. There might be other host of reasons that we don’t know for
sure until we get a clearer picture next year.
Cheers,
Joseph

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of
Timothy via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 10:12 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making
the Web Better through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev

Does anyone know why Microsoft is going with Google's Chromium rather
than Mozilla's Gecko for the rendering engine? If we're talking about
fostering open-source initiatives, it does seem that, at a glance,
Mozilla's philosophy wins out. Whether or not it works in practice is
an issue which I'm entirely ignorant of.
I assume it's as simple as Chrome having a higher market share than
Firefox, which means that the chromium engine does too, so supporting
the most widely used rendering engine (apart from Apple's Webkit) is
probably the easiest move from a developer's standpoint.
Timothy
----- Original Message -----
From: Joseph Lee
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 12:23 PM
Subject: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making the
Web Better through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev

Hi all,

The below blog was written by Joe Belfiore, who is now one of the
leaders for Windows division at Microsoft. His blog post confirms the
rumor we’ve been hearing for the last few days:
https://blogs.windows.com/windowsexperience/2018/12/06/microsoft-edge-
making-the-web-better-through-more-open-source-collaboration/#JzQMYwuM
6BeHHDRW.97

Basically, Microsoft Edge branding will be retained, but the
underlying rendering engine will be Chromium. With this move, Edge
will be made available to older Windows releases and other platforms.
If you’re using Edge on iOS (some of us are), this combination (edge +
another rendering
engine) should sound familiar, as Edge on iOS uses Edge branding and
is powered by Web Kit, the engine used by Safari.

As for screen readers, I expect developers to start thinking about
testing the new Edge once the preview is released so we can see what
needs to be done. Any screen reader that supports Chromium rendering
engine in some form should have no trouble with common web browsing scenarios.

Cheers,
Joseph










Timothy
 

Microsoft Edge on iOS has always used Apple Webkit for the rendering engine, and I doubt that will ever change.

Timothy

----- Original Message -----
From: "Maria Reyes" <blindteky@...>
To: <win10@win10.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 10:59 PM
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making the Web Better through more open-source collaboration #wintendev


So will the Edge iOS app be redesigned? I use a combo of ie and Firefox.

Maria Reyes
blindteky@...
my group: blind-techies+subscribe@groups.io

On Dec 6, 2018, at 9:52 PM, Joseph Lee <@joslee> wrote:

Hi,
No, Internet Explorer is in maintenance mode at the moment, so it won't make its appearance on "stage".
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Blaster
Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 6:45 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making the Web Better through more open-source collaboration #wintendev

Any possibility of Internet Explorer making a comeback? Or is that off the table?

Blaster


On 12/6/18, David Moore <jesusloves1966@...> wrote:
Hi all!
I do not like Mozilla either!
Waterfox is so fast and easy to use with NVDA and JAWS.
Now, Edge, Narrator works very well in Edge with the 1809 version of
Windows 10.
Have a great one,
David Moore


Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: emile
Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 2:03 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making
the WebBetter through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev

I definitely don’t like mozilla. There seems to have been some
deterioration of the program; it is very slow loading compared to what
it used to be. I like Edge but yes, they really need to work on it
but personally I think they should continue working ont and get the bugs out.
Emile.

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of
Joseph Lee
Sent: Thursday, December 06, 2018 12:18 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making
the Web Better through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev

Hi,
Market share is one metric folks are concerned about, so yes, it might
be that. There might be other host of reasons that we don’t know for
sure until we get a clearer picture next year.
Cheers,
Joseph

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of
Timothy via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 10:12 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making
the Web Better through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev

Does anyone know why Microsoft is going with Google's Chromium rather
than Mozilla's Gecko for the rendering engine? If we're talking about
fostering open-source initiatives, it does seem that, at a glance,
Mozilla's philosophy wins out. Whether or not it works in practice is
an issue which I'm entirely ignorant of.
I assume it's as simple as Chrome having a higher market share than
Firefox, which means that the chromium engine does too, so supporting
the most widely used rendering engine (apart from Apple's Webkit) is
probably the easiest move from a developer's standpoint.
Timothy
----- Original Message -----
From: Joseph Lee
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 12:23 PM
Subject: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making the
Web Better through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev

Hi all,

The below blog was written by Joe Belfiore, who is now one of the
leaders for Windows division at Microsoft. His blog post confirms the
rumor we’ve been hearing for the last few days:
https://blogs.windows.com/windowsexperience/2018/12/06/microsoft-edge-
making-the-web-better-through-more-open-source-collaboration/#JzQMYwuM
6BeHHDRW.97

Basically, Microsoft Edge branding will be retained, but the
underlying rendering engine will be Chromium. With this move, Edge
will be made available to older Windows releases and other platforms.
If you’re using Edge on iOS (some of us are), this combination (edge +
another rendering
engine) should sound familiar, as Edge on iOS uses Edge branding and
is powered by Web Kit, the engine used by Safari.

As for screen readers, I expect developers to start thinking about
testing the new Edge once the preview is released so we can see what
needs to be done. Any screen reader that supports Chromium rendering
engine in some form should have no trouble with common web browsing scenarios.

Cheers,
Joseph










Gerardo Corripio
 

OH OK so for us with Windows10 Esentials, what’s the panorama going to be? I love its accessibility now with the current Edge! it tells you when a page is loading etc.

Gera
Enviado desde mi iPhone SE de Telcel

El 6 dic 2018, a la(s) 11:23 a. m., Joseph Lee <joseph.lee22590@...> escribió:

Hi all,

 

The below blog was written by Joe Belfiore, who is now one of the leaders for Windows division at Microsoft. His blog post confirms the rumor we’ve been hearing for the last few days:

https://blogs.windows.com/windowsexperience/2018/12/06/microsoft-edge-making-the-web-better-through-more-open-source-collaboration/#JzQMYwuM6BeHHDRW.97

 

Basically, Microsoft Edge branding will be retained, but the underlying rendering engine will be Chromium. With this move, Edge will be made available to older Windows releases and other platforms. If you’re using Edge on iOS (some of us are), this combination (edge + another rendering engine) should sound familiar, as Edge on iOS uses Edge branding and is powered by Web Kit, the engine used by Safari.

 

As for screen readers, I expect developers to start thinking about testing the new Edge once the preview is released so we can see what needs to be done. Any screen reader that supports Chromium rendering engine in some form should have no trouble with common web browsing scenarios.

 

Cheers,

Joseph

 

Hi,

The page loading announcement isn’t from the add-on – it is part of Edge that tells screen readers such as NvDA what to say, and I have incorporated this announcement detection into NVDA not long ago.

As for overall workings with Windows 10 App Essentials, we’ll see.

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gerardo Corripio
Sent: Friday, December 7, 2018 5:23 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making the Web Better through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev

 

OH OK so for us with Windows10 Esentials, what’s the panorama going to be? I love its accessibility now with the current Edge! it tells you when a page is loading etc.

Gera

Enviado desde mi iPhone SE de Telcel


El 6 dic 2018, a la(s) 11:23 a. m., Joseph Lee <joseph.lee22590@...> escribió:

Hi all,

 

The below blog was written by Joe Belfiore, who is now one of the leaders for Windows division at Microsoft. His blog post confirms the rumor we’ve been hearing for the last few days:

https://blogs.windows.com/windowsexperience/2018/12/06/microsoft-edge-making-the-web-better-through-more-open-source-collaboration/#JzQMYwuM6BeHHDRW.97

 

Basically, Microsoft Edge branding will be retained, but the underlying rendering engine will be Chromium. With this move, Edge will be made available to older Windows releases and other platforms. If you’re using Edge on iOS (some of us are), this combination (edge + another rendering engine) should sound familiar, as Edge on iOS uses Edge branding and is powered by Web Kit, the engine used by Safari.

 

As for screen readers, I expect developers to start thinking about testing the new Edge once the preview is released so we can see what needs to be done. Any screen reader that supports Chromium rendering engine in some form should have no trouble with common web browsing scenarios.

 

Cheers,

Joseph

Scott VanDeWalle <scottvandewalle2@...>
 

This sounds like some good  news.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Joseph Lee
Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 12:23 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making the WebBetter through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev

 

Hi all,

 

The below blog was written by Joe Belfiore, who is now one of the leaders for Windows division at Microsoft. His blog post confirms the rumor we’ve been hearing for the last few days:

https://blogs.windows.com/windowsexperience/2018/12/06/microsoft-edge-making-the-web-better-through-more-open-source-collaboration/#JzQMYwuM6BeHHDRW.97

 

Basically, Microsoft Edge branding will be retained, but the underlying rendering engine will be Chromium. With this move, Edge will be made available to older Windows releases and other platforms. If you’re using Edge on iOS (some of us are), this combination (edge + another rendering engine) should sound familiar, as Edge on iOS uses Edge branding and is powered by Web Kit, the engine used by Safari.

 

As for screen readers, I expect developers to start thinking about testing the new Edge once the preview is released so we can see what needs to be done. Any screen reader that supports Chromium rendering engine in some form should have no trouble with common web browsing scenarios.

 

Cheers,

Joseph

 

Majid Hussain
 

hi there,
since ms are changing the underlying components, does that mean
updates to edge will be frequent?
that is to say done via store than the big feature updates?
just curious?
Majid

On 07/12/2018, Scott VanDeWalle <scottvandewalle2@...> wrote:
This sounds like some good news.

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: Joseph Lee
Sent: Thursday, December 6, 2018 12:23 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: [win10] Windows Experience blog: Microsoft Edge - Making the
WebBetter through more open-source collaboration #WinTenDev

Hi all,

The below blog was written by Joe Belfiore, who is now one of the leaders
for Windows division at Microsoft. His blog post confirms the rumor we’ve
been hearing for the last few days:
https://blogs.windows.com/windowsexperience/2018/12/06/microsoft-edge-making-the-web-better-through-more-open-source-collaboration/#JzQMYwuM6BeHHDRW.97

Basically, Microsoft Edge branding will be retained, but the underlying
rendering engine will be Chromium. With this move, Edge will be made
available to older Windows releases and other platforms. If you’re using
Edge on iOS (some of us are), this combination (edge + another rendering
engine) should sound familiar, as Edge on iOS uses Edge branding and is
powered by Web Kit, the engine used by Safari.

As for screen readers, I expect developers to start thinking about testing
the new Edge once the preview is released so we can see what needs to be
done. Any screen reader that supports Chromium rendering engine in some form
should have no trouble with common web browsing scenarios.

Cheers,
Joseph






--
kind regards,
Majid Hussain