Visualstudio What Does One Need?


Martin McCormick
 

There is an application on github I would like to run that is
written in visualstudio. I have never in my life compiled any C
source for Windows but I have, in the past, installed a lot of
unix packages so the process isn't totally foreign to me, just
the Windows specifics.

https://github.com/SnoopWare/usbsnoop

Do I have to buy anything or is the build environment
free, something like xcode for the Mac?

Also, I don't really know what already exists on the HP
Pavilion since I haven't ever tried to compile any C or C++
before.

The Windows10 that came with this computer is Windows10
Home edition and, other than some HP-specific applications, it is
standard Windows as far as I can tell.

I have written C code that compiles under gcc for unix
systems so it's like saying that I speek English but there are
probably some dialects of English that would be a bit of culture
shock at first.

This might be a good way to get started learning about
the development environment in Windows of which I know absolutely
nothing right now. This project will be to simply follow the
instructions for compiling the existing code and installing it on
the system. After reading some of the documentation, I know I
will need to be sure to tell the make process to use the 64-bit
code as there is a warning that you must not compile 32-bit code
if your system is 64-bit or visa vursa.

Any tips or suggestions are welcome. Thank you.

Martin McCormick


 

Hi,
You can use Visual Studio 2019 Community as it is a free product. Although
the docs might say you need a specific Visual Studio version, if it doesn't
specify that, try with 2019. By the way, you can run Linux binaries on
Windows through Windows Subsystem for Linux.
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Martin
McCormick
Sent: Friday, April 30, 2021 2:24 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: [win10] Visualstudio What Does One Need?

There is an application on github I would like to run that is written in
visualstudio. I have never in my life compiled any C source for Windows but
I have, in the past, installed a lot of unix packages so the process isn't
totally foreign to me, just the Windows specifics.

https://github.com/SnoopWare/usbsnoop

Do I have to buy anything or is the build environment free,
something like xcode for the Mac?

Also, I don't really know what already exists on the HP Pavilion
since I haven't ever tried to compile any C or C++ before.

The Windows10 that came with this computer is Windows10 Home edition
and, other than some HP-specific applications, it is standard Windows as far
as I can tell.

I have written C code that compiles under gcc for unix systems so
it's like saying that I speek English but there are probably some dialects
of English that would be a bit of culture shock at first.

This might be a good way to get started learning about the
development environment in Windows of which I know absolutely nothing right
now. This project will be to simply follow the instructions for compiling
the existing code and installing it on the system. After reading some of
the documentation, I know I will need to be sure to tell the make process to
use the 64-bit code as there is a warning that you must not compile 32-bit
code if your system is 64-bit or visa vursa.

Any tips or suggestions are welcome. Thank you.

Martin McCormick


Russell James
 

Hi Martin,

That is an interesting project.

They did a nice job with their documentation.

They developed the software using Visual Studio 2017.
Like Joseph said you can probably use the free community edition visual studio 2019 to build/modify this software.

The software was written in C++.

They did include the executables for 32 and 64 bit  platforms on their release page.

Russ


On Fri, Apr 30, 2021 at 5:55 PM Joseph Lee <joseph.lee22590@...> wrote:
Hi,
You can use Visual Studio 2019 Community as it is a free product. Although
the docs might say you need a specific Visual Studio version, if it doesn't
specify that, try with 2019. By the way, you can run Linux binaries on
Windows through Windows Subsystem for Linux.
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Martin
McCormick
Sent: Friday, April 30, 2021 2:24 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: [win10] Visualstudio What Does One Need?

There is an application on github I would like to run that is written in
visualstudio.  I have never in my life compiled any C source for Windows but
I have, in the past, installed a lot of unix packages so the process isn't
totally foreign to me, just the Windows specifics.

https://github.com/SnoopWare/usbsnoop

        Do I have to buy anything or is the build environment free,
something like xcode for the Mac?

        Also, I don't really know what already exists on the HP Pavilion
since I haven't ever tried to compile any C or C++ before.

        The Windows10 that came with this computer is Windows10 Home edition
and, other than some HP-specific applications, it is standard Windows as far
as I can tell.

        I have written C code that compiles under gcc for unix systems so
it's like saying that I speek English but there are probably some dialects
of English that would be a bit of culture shock at first.

        This might be a good way to get started learning about the
development environment in Windows of which I know absolutely nothing right
now.  This project will be to simply follow the instructions for compiling
the existing code and installing it on the system.  After reading some of
the documentation, I know I will need to be sure to tell the make process to
use the 64-bit code as there is a warning that you must not compile 32-bit
code if your system is 64-bit or visa vursa.

        Any tips or suggestions are welcome.  Thank you.

Martin McCormick











Martin McCormick
 

Thanks for both responses. I was hoping for some information on
how to proceed, here, and you both gave me more information than
I expected and it's all good news.
"Joseph Lee" <joseph.lee22590@gmail.com> writes:
Hi,
You can use Visual Studio 2019 Community as it is a free product. Although
the docs might say you need a specific Visual Studio version, if it
doesn't
specify that, try with 2019. By the way, you can run Linux binaries on
Windows through Windows Subsystem for Linux.
Cheers,
Joseph
This shows how little I really know in that I had no idea
that that was possible. I thought it was pretty cool that Linux
binaries could run on FreeBSD which is another open-source
distribution of a unix-like operating system. I use those words
after I once read that since AT&T invented Unix with a capital U,
all the other unixen such as that from DEC, IBM, FreeBSD and the
myriad flavors of Linux are unix-like in that they all have the
same basic concept that the original AT&T Unix developed which,
in 1968, was one of the first operating systems to make it
possible for one computer to serve multiple users at what seemed
like the same time.

"Russell James" <4rjames@gmail.com> writes:
Hi Martin,

That is an interesting project.
They did a nice job with their documentation.
They developed the software using Visual Studio 2017.
Like Joseph said you can probably use the free community edition visual
studio 2019 to build/modify this software.
The software was written in C++.
They did include the executables for 32 and 64 bit platforms on their
release page.

Russ
I will probably end up doing both running the executable
binary first and installing visualstudio to learn from the
sources.

I've wondered how Windows source code looks. Now's the
time to find out.

Martin


Russell James
 

Hi Martin,

I'm pleased to hear you were not discouraged!  :-)

I like your strategy, try the prebuilt executables and then try building them yourself to see if you get the same results.

Based on their documentation I would expect you will find clean, documented, well organized source code.
Since you said you were familiar with C code you should find it readable.
I have not read their source code so I can't say how extensive their use of C++ is in this application.
You often find C code developed using the C++ development tools.
Especially with low level software like this application.
It just might remind you of that UNIX C code...  :-)
However, if they take advantage of the template and object oriented features of C++ you may find it more challenging...
Still a great way to learn C/C++ on Windows!

Hi Joseph,

My Linux friends that use Windows are not satisfied with the performance of WSL.
Is there anything you can recommend?

They tell me their Virtual Box Linux images are much better performance than WSL.

Some of them use cygwin to provide Linux features on their Windows computers.

Russ


On Fri, Apr 30, 2021 at 9:10 PM Martin McCormick <martin.m@...> wrote:
Thanks for both responses.  I was hoping for some information on
how to proceed, here, and you both gave me more information than
I expected and it's all good news.
"Joseph Lee" <joseph.lee22590@...> writes:
> Hi,
> You can use Visual Studio 2019 Community as it is a free product. Although
> the docs might say you need a specific Visual Studio version, if it
> doesn't
> specify that, try with 2019. By the way, you can run Linux binaries on
> Windows through Windows Subsystem for Linux.
> Cheers,
> Joseph

        This shows how little I really know in that I had no idea
that that was possible.  I thought it was pretty cool that Linux
binaries could run on FreeBSD which is another open-source
distribution of a unix-like operating system.  I use those words
after I once read that since AT&T invented Unix with a capital U,
all the other unixen such as that from DEC, IBM, FreeBSD and the
myriad flavors of Linux are unix-like in that they all have the
same basic concept that the original AT&T Unix developed which,
in 1968, was one of the first operating systems to make it
possible for one computer to serve multiple users at what seemed
like the same time.

"Russell James" <4rjames@...> writes:
> Hi Martin,
>
> That is an interesting project.
> They did a nice job with their documentation.
> They developed the software using Visual Studio 2017.
> Like Joseph said you can probably use the free community edition visual
> studio 2019 to build/modify this software.
> The software was written in C++.
> They did include the executables for 32 and 64 bit  platforms on their
> release page.
>
> Russ

        I will probably end up doing both running the executable
binary first and installing visualstudio to learn from the
sources.

        I've wondered how Windows source code looks.  Now's the
time to find out.

Martin






Russell James
 

Hi Martin,

Sorry, they are available on the release page:

Enjoy and let us know how you make out.

Russ


On Sat, May 1, 2021 at 9:06 AM Russell James <4rjames@...> wrote:
Hi Martin,

I'm pleased to hear you were not discouraged!  :-)

I like your strategy, try the prebuilt executables and then try building them yourself to see if you get the same results.

Based on their documentation I would expect you will find clean, documented, well organized source code.
Since you said you were familiar with C code you should find it readable.
I have not read their source code so I can't say how extensive their use of C++ is in this application.
You often find C code developed using the C++ development tools.
Especially with low level software like this application.
It just might remind you of that UNIX C code...  :-)
However, if they take advantage of the template and object oriented features of C++ you may find it more challenging...
Still a great way to learn C/C++ on Windows!

Hi Joseph,

My Linux friends that use Windows are not satisfied with the performance of WSL.
Is there anything you can recommend?

They tell me their Virtual Box Linux images are much better performance than WSL.

Some of them use cygwin to provide Linux features on their Windows computers.

Russ

On Fri, Apr 30, 2021 at 9:10 PM Martin McCormick <martin.m@...> wrote:
Thanks for both responses.  I was hoping for some information on
how to proceed, here, and you both gave me more information than
I expected and it's all good news.
"Joseph Lee" <joseph.lee22590@...> writes:
> Hi,
> You can use Visual Studio 2019 Community as it is a free product. Although
> the docs might say you need a specific Visual Studio version, if it
> doesn't
> specify that, try with 2019. By the way, you can run Linux binaries on
> Windows through Windows Subsystem for Linux.
> Cheers,
> Joseph

        This shows how little I really know in that I had no idea
that that was possible.  I thought it was pretty cool that Linux
binaries could run on FreeBSD which is another open-source
distribution of a unix-like operating system.  I use those words
after I once read that since AT&T invented Unix with a capital U,
all the other unixen such as that from DEC, IBM, FreeBSD and the
myriad flavors of Linux are unix-like in that they all have the
same basic concept that the original AT&T Unix developed which,
in 1968, was one of the first operating systems to make it
possible for one computer to serve multiple users at what seemed
like the same time.

"Russell James" <4rjames@...> writes:
> Hi Martin,
>
> That is an interesting project.
> They did a nice job with their documentation.
> They developed the software using Visual Studio 2017.
> Like Joseph said you can probably use the free community edition visual
> studio 2019 to build/modify this software.
> The software was written in C++.
> They did include the executables for 32 and 64 bit  platforms on their
> release page.
>
> Russ

        I will probably end up doing both running the executable
binary first and installing visualstudio to learn from the
sources.

        I've wondered how Windows source code looks.  Now's the
time to find out.

Martin






Martin McCormick
 

Thanks. That explains a lot. The url I was using gets you to
much of the same content except that it is a different view and
misses a number of things. The url you sent is much better and the
executable binary is right there.

I downloaded that and it will eventually run but right
now it's not happy about something which I will need to
investigate further but that is out of the scope of the discussion.
The errors I am getting make sense and the complaints look more
like what you see when something isn't configured right as
opposed to freezes, lockups and spews of utter garbage. They
contain the name of the radio connected to one of the USB
ports, just nothing about any data being transferred.

The next thing is to install visualstudio plus become
more familiar with the documentation of the usb snooper. It
could be that the link is encrypted or that I need to compile
something else, here, but it does look like success is possible.
Thanks to all.

Martin

"Russell James" <4rjames@gmail.com> writes:

Hi Martin,

Sorry, they are available on the release page:
https://github.com/SnoopWare/usbsnoop/releases


 

Hi,

Microsoft says WSL 2 improves performance as it will use a “real” Linux kernel inside a custom virtual machine powered by elements of Hyper-V.

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Russell James
Sent: Saturday, May 1, 2021 6:07 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Visualstudio What Does One Need?

 

Hi Martin,

 

I'm pleased to hear you were not discouraged!  :-)

 

I like your strategy, try the prebuilt executables and then try building them yourself to see if you get the same results.

 

Based on their documentation I would expect you will find clean, documented, well organized source code.

Since you said you were familiar with C code you should find it readable.

I have not read their source code so I can't say how extensive their use of C++ is in this application.

You often find C code developed using the C++ development tools.

Especially with low level software like this application.

It just might remind you of that UNIX C code...  :-)

However, if they take advantage of the template and object oriented features of C++ you may find it more challenging...

Still a great way to learn C/C++ on Windows!

 

Hi Joseph,

 

My Linux friends that use Windows are not satisfied with the performance of WSL.

Is there anything you can recommend?

 

They tell me their Virtual Box Linux images are much better performance than WSL.

 

Some of them use cygwin to provide Linux features on their Windows computers.

 

Russ

 

On Fri, Apr 30, 2021 at 9:10 PM Martin McCormick <martin.m@...> wrote:

Thanks for both responses.  I was hoping for some information on
how to proceed, here, and you both gave me more information than
I expected and it's all good news.
"Joseph Lee" <joseph.lee22590@...> writes:
> Hi,
> You can use Visual Studio 2019 Community as it is a free product. Although
> the docs might say you need a specific Visual Studio version, if it
> doesn't
> specify that, try with 2019. By the way, you can run Linux binaries on
> Windows through Windows Subsystem for Linux.
> Cheers,
> Joseph

        This shows how little I really know in that I had no idea
that that was possible.  I thought it was pretty cool that Linux
binaries could run on FreeBSD which is another open-source
distribution of a unix-like operating system.  I use those words
after I once read that since AT&T invented Unix with a capital U,
all the other unixen such as that from DEC, IBM, FreeBSD and the
myriad flavors of Linux are unix-like in that they all have the
same basic concept that the original AT&T Unix developed which,
in 1968, was one of the first operating systems to make it
possible for one computer to serve multiple users at what seemed
like the same time.

"Russell James" <4rjames@...> writes:
> Hi Martin,
>
> That is an interesting project.
> They did a nice job with their documentation.
> They developed the software using Visual Studio 2017.
> Like Joseph said you can probably use the free community edition visual
> studio 2019 to build/modify this software.
> The software was written in C++.
> They did include the executables for 32 and 64 bit  platforms on their
> release page.
>
> Russ

        I will probably end up doing both running the executable
binary first and installing visualstudio to learn from the
sources.

        I've wondered how Windows source code looks.  Now's the
time to find out.

Martin





Russell James
 

Hi Joseph,

Thank you, do you know the release date for WSL2?

Russ


On Sat, May 1, 2021 at 3:22 PM Joseph Lee <joseph.lee22590@...> wrote:

Hi,

Microsoft says WSL 2 improves performance as it will use a “real” Linux kernel inside a custom virtual machine powered by elements of Hyper-V.

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Russell James
Sent: Saturday, May 1, 2021 6:07 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Visualstudio What Does One Need?

 

Hi Martin,

 

I'm pleased to hear you were not discouraged!  :-)

 

I like your strategy, try the prebuilt executables and then try building them yourself to see if you get the same results.

 

Based on their documentation I would expect you will find clean, documented, well organized source code.

Since you said you were familiar with C code you should find it readable.

I have not read their source code so I can't say how extensive their use of C++ is in this application.

You often find C code developed using the C++ development tools.

Especially with low level software like this application.

It just might remind you of that UNIX C code...  :-)

However, if they take advantage of the template and object oriented features of C++ you may find it more challenging...

Still a great way to learn C/C++ on Windows!

 

Hi Joseph,

 

My Linux friends that use Windows are not satisfied with the performance of WSL.

Is there anything you can recommend?

 

They tell me their Virtual Box Linux images are much better performance than WSL.

 

Some of them use cygwin to provide Linux features on their Windows computers.

 

Russ

 

On Fri, Apr 30, 2021 at 9:10 PM Martin McCormick <martin.m@...> wrote:

Thanks for both responses.  I was hoping for some information on
how to proceed, here, and you both gave me more information than
I expected and it's all good news.
"Joseph Lee" <joseph.lee22590@...> writes:
> Hi,
> You can use Visual Studio 2019 Community as it is a free product. Although
> the docs might say you need a specific Visual Studio version, if it
> doesn't
> specify that, try with 2019. By the way, you can run Linux binaries on
> Windows through Windows Subsystem for Linux.
> Cheers,
> Joseph

        This shows how little I really know in that I had no idea
that that was possible.  I thought it was pretty cool that Linux
binaries could run on FreeBSD which is another open-source
distribution of a unix-like operating system.  I use those words
after I once read that since AT&T invented Unix with a capital U,
all the other unixen such as that from DEC, IBM, FreeBSD and the
myriad flavors of Linux are unix-like in that they all have the
same basic concept that the original AT&T Unix developed which,
in 1968, was one of the first operating systems to make it
possible for one computer to serve multiple users at what seemed
like the same time.

"Russell James" <4rjames@...> writes:
> Hi Martin,
>
> That is an interesting project.
> They did a nice job with their documentation.
> They developed the software using Visual Studio 2017.
> Like Joseph said you can probably use the free community edition visual
> studio 2019 to build/modify this software.
> The software was written in C++.
> They did include the executables for 32 and 64 bit  platforms on their
> release page.
>
> Russ

        I will probably end up doing both running the executable
binary first and installing visualstudio to learn from the
sources.

        I've wondered how Windows source code looks.  Now's the
time to find out.

Martin





 

Hi,

It’s already here – included in Version 2004 (May 2020 Update). At the moment Microsoft and Windows Insiders subscribed to dev channel are testing GUI apps support, although several threads on GitHub (specifically, WSL repo) notes that GUI support doesn’t work on certain configurations and that one must disable GUI support to get WSL distros working again (this is build 21370).
Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Russell James
Sent: Saturday, May 1, 2021 12:26 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Visualstudio What Does One Need?

 

Hi Joseph,

 

Thank you, do you know the release date for WSL2?

 

Russ

 

On Sat, May 1, 2021 at 3:22 PM Joseph Lee <joseph.lee22590@...> wrote:

Hi,

Microsoft says WSL 2 improves performance as it will use a “real” Linux kernel inside a custom virtual machine powered by elements of Hyper-V.

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Russell James
Sent: Saturday, May 1, 2021 6:07 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Visualstudio What Does One Need?

 

Hi Martin,

 

I'm pleased to hear you were not discouraged!  :-)

 

I like your strategy, try the prebuilt executables and then try building them yourself to see if you get the same results.

 

Based on their documentation I would expect you will find clean, documented, well organized source code.

Since you said you were familiar with C code you should find it readable.

I have not read their source code so I can't say how extensive their use of C++ is in this application.

You often find C code developed using the C++ development tools.

Especially with low level software like this application.

It just might remind you of that UNIX C code...  :-)

However, if they take advantage of the template and object oriented features of C++ you may find it more challenging...

Still a great way to learn C/C++ on Windows!

 

Hi Joseph,

 

My Linux friends that use Windows are not satisfied with the performance of WSL.

Is there anything you can recommend?

 

They tell me their Virtual Box Linux images are much better performance than WSL.

 

Some of them use cygwin to provide Linux features on their Windows computers.

 

Russ

 

On Fri, Apr 30, 2021 at 9:10 PM Martin McCormick <martin.m@...> wrote:

Thanks for both responses.  I was hoping for some information on
how to proceed, here, and you both gave me more information than
I expected and it's all good news.
"Joseph Lee" <joseph.lee22590@...> writes:
> Hi,
> You can use Visual Studio 2019 Community as it is a free product. Although
> the docs might say you need a specific Visual Studio version, if it
> doesn't
> specify that, try with 2019. By the way, you can run Linux binaries on
> Windows through Windows Subsystem for Linux.
> Cheers,
> Joseph

        This shows how little I really know in that I had no idea
that that was possible.  I thought it was pretty cool that Linux
binaries could run on FreeBSD which is another open-source
distribution of a unix-like operating system.  I use those words
after I once read that since AT&T invented Unix with a capital U,
all the other unixen such as that from DEC, IBM, FreeBSD and the
myriad flavors of Linux are unix-like in that they all have the
same basic concept that the original AT&T Unix developed which,
in 1968, was one of the first operating systems to make it
possible for one computer to serve multiple users at what seemed
like the same time.

"Russell James" <4rjames@...> writes:
> Hi Martin,
>
> That is an interesting project.
> They did a nice job with their documentation.
> They developed the software using Visual Studio 2017.
> Like Joseph said you can probably use the free community edition visual
> studio 2019 to build/modify this software.
> The software was written in C++.
> They did include the executables for 32 and 64 bit  platforms on their
> release page.
>
> Russ

        I will probably end up doing both running the executable
binary first and installing visualstudio to learn from the
sources.

        I've wondered how Windows source code looks.  Now's the
time to find out.

Martin




 

Hi,

Actually, WSL2 has been part of Windows since Version 1903 (May 2019 Update).

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Joseph Lee via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, May 1, 2021 12:30 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Visualstudio What Does One Need?

 

Hi,

It’s already here – included in Version 2004 (May 2020 Update). At the moment Microsoft and Windows Insiders subscribed to dev channel are testing GUI apps support, although several threads on GitHub (specifically, WSL repo) notes that GUI support doesn’t work on certain configurations and that one must disable GUI support to get WSL distros working again (this is build 21370).
Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Russell James
Sent: Saturday, May 1, 2021 12:26 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Visualstudio What Does One Need?

 

Hi Joseph,

 

Thank you, do you know the release date for WSL2?

 

Russ

 

On Sat, May 1, 2021 at 3:22 PM Joseph Lee <joseph.lee22590@...> wrote:

Hi,

Microsoft says WSL 2 improves performance as it will use a “real” Linux kernel inside a custom virtual machine powered by elements of Hyper-V.

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Russell James
Sent: Saturday, May 1, 2021 6:07 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Visualstudio What Does One Need?

 

Hi Martin,

 

I'm pleased to hear you were not discouraged!  :-)

 

I like your strategy, try the prebuilt executables and then try building them yourself to see if you get the same results.

 

Based on their documentation I would expect you will find clean, documented, well organized source code.

Since you said you were familiar with C code you should find it readable.

I have not read their source code so I can't say how extensive their use of C++ is in this application.

You often find C code developed using the C++ development tools.

Especially with low level software like this application.

It just might remind you of that UNIX C code...  :-)

However, if they take advantage of the template and object oriented features of C++ you may find it more challenging...

Still a great way to learn C/C++ on Windows!

 

Hi Joseph,

 

My Linux friends that use Windows are not satisfied with the performance of WSL.

Is there anything you can recommend?

 

They tell me their Virtual Box Linux images are much better performance than WSL.

 

Some of them use cygwin to provide Linux features on their Windows computers.

 

Russ

 

On Fri, Apr 30, 2021 at 9:10 PM Martin McCormick <martin.m@...> wrote:

Thanks for both responses.  I was hoping for some information on
how to proceed, here, and you both gave me more information than
I expected and it's all good news.
"Joseph Lee" <joseph.lee22590@...> writes:
> Hi,
> You can use Visual Studio 2019 Community as it is a free product. Although
> the docs might say you need a specific Visual Studio version, if it
> doesn't
> specify that, try with 2019. By the way, you can run Linux binaries on
> Windows through Windows Subsystem for Linux.
> Cheers,
> Joseph

        This shows how little I really know in that I had no idea
that that was possible.  I thought it was pretty cool that Linux
binaries could run on FreeBSD which is another open-source
distribution of a unix-like operating system.  I use those words
after I once read that since AT&T invented Unix with a capital U,
all the other unixen such as that from DEC, IBM, FreeBSD and the
myriad flavors of Linux are unix-like in that they all have the
same basic concept that the original AT&T Unix developed which,
in 1968, was one of the first operating systems to make it
possible for one computer to serve multiple users at what seemed
like the same time.

"Russell James" <4rjames@...> writes:
> Hi Martin,
>
> That is an interesting project.
> They did a nice job with their documentation.
> They developed the software using Visual Studio 2017.
> Like Joseph said you can probably use the free community edition visual
> studio 2019 to build/modify this software.
> The software was written in C++.
> They did include the executables for 32 and 64 bit  platforms on their
> release page.
>
> Russ

        I will probably end up doing both running the executable
binary first and installing visualstudio to learn from the
sources.

        I've wondered how Windows source code looks.  Now's the
time to find out.

Martin



Russell James
 

Hi Joseph,

Thank you

If this is the case then they didn't find the performance acceptable

I'll confirm but think they are running the latest version.

Russ


On Sat, May 1, 2021 at 3:33 PM Joseph Lee <joseph.lee22590@...> wrote:

Hi,

Actually, WSL2 has been part of Windows since Version 1903 (May 2019 Update).

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Joseph Lee via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, May 1, 2021 12:30 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Visualstudio What Does One Need?

 

Hi,

It’s already here – included in Version 2004 (May 2020 Update). At the moment Microsoft and Windows Insiders subscribed to dev channel are testing GUI apps support, although several threads on GitHub (specifically, WSL repo) notes that GUI support doesn’t work on certain configurations and that one must disable GUI support to get WSL distros working again (this is build 21370).
Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Russell James
Sent: Saturday, May 1, 2021 12:26 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Visualstudio What Does One Need?

 

Hi Joseph,

 

Thank you, do you know the release date for WSL2?

 

Russ

 

On Sat, May 1, 2021 at 3:22 PM Joseph Lee <joseph.lee22590@...> wrote:

Hi,

Microsoft says WSL 2 improves performance as it will use a “real” Linux kernel inside a custom virtual machine powered by elements of Hyper-V.

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Russell James
Sent: Saturday, May 1, 2021 6:07 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Visualstudio What Does One Need?

 

Hi Martin,

 

I'm pleased to hear you were not discouraged!  :-)

 

I like your strategy, try the prebuilt executables and then try building them yourself to see if you get the same results.

 

Based on their documentation I would expect you will find clean, documented, well organized source code.

Since you said you were familiar with C code you should find it readable.

I have not read their source code so I can't say how extensive their use of C++ is in this application.

You often find C code developed using the C++ development tools.

Especially with low level software like this application.

It just might remind you of that UNIX C code...  :-)

However, if they take advantage of the template and object oriented features of C++ you may find it more challenging...

Still a great way to learn C/C++ on Windows!

 

Hi Joseph,

 

My Linux friends that use Windows are not satisfied with the performance of WSL.

Is there anything you can recommend?

 

They tell me their Virtual Box Linux images are much better performance than WSL.

 

Some of them use cygwin to provide Linux features on their Windows computers.

 

Russ

 

On Fri, Apr 30, 2021 at 9:10 PM Martin McCormick <martin.m@...> wrote:

Thanks for both responses.  I was hoping for some information on
how to proceed, here, and you both gave me more information than
I expected and it's all good news.
"Joseph Lee" <joseph.lee22590@...> writes:
> Hi,
> You can use Visual Studio 2019 Community as it is a free product. Although
> the docs might say you need a specific Visual Studio version, if it
> doesn't
> specify that, try with 2019. By the way, you can run Linux binaries on
> Windows through Windows Subsystem for Linux.
> Cheers,
> Joseph

        This shows how little I really know in that I had no idea
that that was possible.  I thought it was pretty cool that Linux
binaries could run on FreeBSD which is another open-source
distribution of a unix-like operating system.  I use those words
after I once read that since AT&T invented Unix with a capital U,
all the other unixen such as that from DEC, IBM, FreeBSD and the
myriad flavors of Linux are unix-like in that they all have the
same basic concept that the original AT&T Unix developed which,
in 1968, was one of the first operating systems to make it
possible for one computer to serve multiple users at what seemed
like the same time.

"Russell James" <4rjames@...> writes:
> Hi Martin,
>
> That is an interesting project.
> They did a nice job with their documentation.
> They developed the software using Visual Studio 2017.
> Like Joseph said you can probably use the free community edition visual
> studio 2019 to build/modify this software.
> The software was written in C++.
> They did include the executables for 32 and 64 bit  platforms on their
> release page.
>
> Russ

        I will probably end up doing both running the executable
binary first and installing visualstudio to learn from the
sources.

        I've wondered how Windows source code looks.  Now's the
time to find out.

Martin



 

Hi,

Make sure that:

  1. Widows version is Version 1903 or later.
  2. If WSL is enabled, make sure that “wsl -l –verbose” (from Command Prompt) says “2”.

 

Cheers,

Joseph

 

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Russell James
Sent: Saturday, May 1, 2021 12:49 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Visualstudio What Does One Need?

 

Hi Joseph,

 

Thank you

 

If this is the case then they didn't find the performance acceptable

 

I'll confirm but think they are running the latest version.

 

Russ

 

On Sat, May 1, 2021 at 3:33 PM Joseph Lee <joseph.lee22590@...> wrote:

Hi,

Actually, WSL2 has been part of Windows since Version 1903 (May 2019 Update).

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Joseph Lee via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, May 1, 2021 12:30 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Visualstudio What Does One Need?

 

Hi,

It’s already here – included in Version 2004 (May 2020 Update). At the moment Microsoft and Windows Insiders subscribed to dev channel are testing GUI apps support, although several threads on GitHub (specifically, WSL repo) notes that GUI support doesn’t work on certain configurations and that one must disable GUI support to get WSL distros working again (this is build 21370).
Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Russell James
Sent: Saturday, May 1, 2021 12:26 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Visualstudio What Does One Need?

 

Hi Joseph,

 

Thank you, do you know the release date for WSL2?

 

Russ

 

On Sat, May 1, 2021 at 3:22 PM Joseph Lee <joseph.lee22590@...> wrote:

Hi,

Microsoft says WSL 2 improves performance as it will use a “real” Linux kernel inside a custom virtual machine powered by elements of Hyper-V.

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Russell James
Sent: Saturday, May 1, 2021 6:07 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Visualstudio What Does One Need?

 

Hi Martin,

 

I'm pleased to hear you were not discouraged!  :-)

 

I like your strategy, try the prebuilt executables and then try building them yourself to see if you get the same results.

 

Based on their documentation I would expect you will find clean, documented, well organized source code.

Since you said you were familiar with C code you should find it readable.

I have not read their source code so I can't say how extensive their use of C++ is in this application.

You often find C code developed using the C++ development tools.

Especially with low level software like this application.

It just might remind you of that UNIX C code...  :-)

However, if they take advantage of the template and object oriented features of C++ you may find it more challenging...

Still a great way to learn C/C++ on Windows!

 

Hi Joseph,

 

My Linux friends that use Windows are not satisfied with the performance of WSL.

Is there anything you can recommend?

 

They tell me their Virtual Box Linux images are much better performance than WSL.

 

Some of them use cygwin to provide Linux features on their Windows computers.

 

Russ

 

On Fri, Apr 30, 2021 at 9:10 PM Martin McCormick <martin.m@...> wrote:

Thanks for both responses.  I was hoping for some information on
how to proceed, here, and you both gave me more information than
I expected and it's all good news.
"Joseph Lee" <joseph.lee22590@...> writes:
> Hi,
> You can use Visual Studio 2019 Community as it is a free product. Although
> the docs might say you need a specific Visual Studio version, if it
> doesn't
> specify that, try with 2019. By the way, you can run Linux binaries on
> Windows through Windows Subsystem for Linux.
> Cheers,
> Joseph

        This shows how little I really know in that I had no idea
that that was possible.  I thought it was pretty cool that Linux
binaries could run on FreeBSD which is another open-source
distribution of a unix-like operating system.  I use those words
after I once read that since AT&T invented Unix with a capital U,
all the other unixen such as that from DEC, IBM, FreeBSD and the
myriad flavors of Linux are unix-like in that they all have the
same basic concept that the original AT&T Unix developed which,
in 1968, was one of the first operating systems to make it
possible for one computer to serve multiple users at what seemed
like the same time.

"Russell James" <4rjames@...> writes:
> Hi Martin,
>
> That is an interesting project.
> They did a nice job with their documentation.
> They developed the software using Visual Studio 2017.
> Like Joseph said you can probably use the free community edition visual
> studio 2019 to build/modify this software.
> The software was written in C++.
> They did include the executables for 32 and 64 bit  platforms on their
> release page.
>
> Russ

        I will probably end up doing both running the executable
binary first and installing visualstudio to learn from the
sources.

        I've wondered how Windows source code looks.  Now's the
time to find out.

Martin