Topics

Upgrade windows 8.1 to windows 10

Ján Kulik
 

Hi all, I do not know if I'm right, I want to ask you how did you manage an upgrade from an older Windows 10 operating system? Did you know how to navigate through NVDA? Or how does the whole work from being upgraded from Windows 8.1 to Windows 10? I have downloaded media creation tools.exe.


Best begars,
Jan

 

Hi,

First, you’ve found the correct place for Windows 10 questions.

Let’s go over this one thing at a time:

  • Upgrading from Windows 8.1 to 10: first, you need to have a valid license to upgrade from Windows 8.1 to 10. The free program that gave out Windows 10 for free for those using assistive technology has officially ended.
  • Using Media Creation Tool: yes, you can use it to install Windows 10 (for others, you should use this tool if needed, not as the first method for upgrading between Windows 10 releases).
  • Upgrading between Windows 10 releases: these are called “feature updates”. The usual way to do this is via Windows Update provided that your system is ready for the next feature update (software and hardware restrictions apply).

 

Cheers,

Jsoeph

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ján Kulik
Sent: Tuesday, December 4, 2018 8:00 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: [win10] Upgrade windows 8.1 to windows 10

 

Hi all, I do not know if I'm right, I want to ask you how did you manage an upgrade from an older Windows 10 operating system? Did you know how to navigate through NVDA? Or how does the whole work from being upgraded from Windows 8.1 to Windows 10? I have downloaded media creation tools.exe.


Best begars,
Jan

Ján Kulik
 

But I am interested in the installation of windows 10. I have learned from one user that I have 2 choices. The first option is to upgrade, the second option is to update them only. There is a shortcut key win + enter for the case if I know the status of the installation via Microsoft Narator. And I also understand correctly that old drivers will be uninstalled and reinstalled with the programs included in the operating system. Or am I wrong?

Sarah k Alawami
 

To start narrator it's now windows control enter, and it's a toggle. I would do a complete reinstall, not an upgrade in place. I never ever trust those as you never know what yuck you left behind

Take care

On 4 Dec 2018, at 9:15, Ján Kulik wrote:

But I am interested in the installation of windows 10. I have learned from one user that I have 2 choices. The first option is to upgrade, the second option is to update them only. There is a shortcut key win + enter for the case if I know the status of the installation via Microsoft Narator. And I also understand correctly that old drivers will be uninstalled and reinstalled with the programs included in the operating system. Or am I wrong?

 

Hi,

I see. Sarah wrote an answer to one of your questions (Narrator toggle command), as well as giving you something to think about (clean install versus upgrade).

Before we continue discussing this further, a few questions for you:

  1. Do you plan to keep up with latest Windows 10 happenings, especially given new Windows 10 releases (builds) come out every six months or so?
  2. The notion of service packs and supplemental updates no longer exist in Windows 10 world. Do you understand the implications of this?
  3. It is no longer advisable to rely on just one screen reader. Are you okay with this?
  4. Whenever new Windows 10 release comes out, are you willing to wait a while before checking for updates, knowing that you’re effectively “upgrading” to a new Windows release frequently?

 

Your answer to the above questions will help us better understand where you are coming from, especially your attitudes and willingness to getting started on an ecosystem that is very different than Windows 8.1 and earlier. I usually do not have all new people go through this procedure, but I think some of the email exchange we had indicates something deep that could haunt you way later (trust me, I’ve seen numerous cases of this before in my time as list owner).
P.S. A personal request: if you don’t mind, can you have the user you talked to write to me privately?

Cheers,

Joseph

 

 

 

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ján Kulik
Sent: Tuesday, December 4, 2018 9:15 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Upgrade windows 8.1 to windows 10

 

But I am interested in the installation of windows 10. I have learned from one user that I have 2 choices. The first option is to upgrade, the second option is to update them only. There is a shortcut key win + enter for the case if I know the status of the installation via Microsoft Narator. And I also understand correctly that old drivers will be uninstalled and reinstalled with the programs included in the operating system. Or am I wrong?

 

On Tue, Dec 4, 2018 at 12:20 PM, Sarah k Alawami wrote:
I would do a complete reinstall, not an upgrade in place. I never ever trust those as you never know what yuck you left behind
I have never understood why this advice is given as a "first response."   Three of the five machines in my house were upgrades in place, one from Windows 7, two more from Windows 8.1, and they've hummed along perfectly fine ever since.  The two others came out of the box with Windows 10 Version 1507 on them and I did an in-place Windows 10 version upgrade to Version 1709 (I think, it may have been 1703, it's been a while).

There is nothing to lose by doing an in-place upgrade from an earlier version of Windows, whether 7, 8, or 8.1, then seeing how things go.  If something gets wonky, then by all means do a clean install after having taken a full system image backup and complete user data backup from the machine first.

Very often the clean install will not be necessary, and the amount of time and effort saved by not having to do possibly years worth of software installation and other tweaking make it more than worth trying the in-place upgrade first.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

     You can safely assume you've created God in your own image when it turns out that God hates all the same people you do.

               ~ Anne Lamott

 

 

By the way, the best set of instructions I've ever found for all the various ways of doing an in-place update for Windows 10 are:

[URL=https://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/16397-repair-install-windows-10-place-upgrade.html]Doing an In-place "Upgrade" to Reinstall Windows 10 Keeping Apps/Programs and User Files[/URL]
NOTE:  You do NOT need to follow the instruction regarding turning off Secure Boot.  It is superfluous.

Now, if you do not already have Windows 10, but are running Windows 7, 8, or 8.1 the only difference in the instructions is that all the steps up to and including kicking off setup.exe will be done under your current Windows.  

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

     You can safely assume you've created God in your own image when it turns out that God hates all the same people you do.

               ~ Anne Lamott

 

 

I constantly forget that you can't cut and paste BBCODE formatted click-through links on Groups.io.  Those instructions are here:

Doing an In-place "Upgrade" to Reinstall Windows 10 Keeping Apps/Programs and User Files

Although I believe the original questioner definitely needs to think through what they're about to do carefully, the fact is that if you intend to stay with the Windows ecosystem as a whole indefinitely, you will eventually be going to Windows 10 (or whatever it might be called by the time Windows 8.1 support is dropped in 2023).

From my perspective from years of being a tech geek, putting off the inevitable generally does not serve the person doing so.  When things are new (or at least newish) and there is a large contingent changing over there is a huge advantage because everyone is asking and answering the same questions around the same time.  After several years pass, things drift into the mists of memory with regard to what one did, when, and when a late adopter asks it is often more difficult to get an answer.  In the case of Windows 10, because of how much has changed in the UI with regard to settings since the introduction in 2015, even the archival information out there proves to be inaccurate because of the UI changes.  There are lots of settings that don't exist anymore that did during 2015 and 2016 and there are lots of others that have been introduced.

Ultimately, a "dive in" will be required.  You need to be willing and able to tolerate the learning curve and discomfort, but if you are adamantly not then one of two things will happen:  you'll be "pushed in," which is never easier, or you will remain on an unsupported version of Windows, which is insanity.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

     You can safely assume you've created God in your own image when it turns out that God hates all the same people you do.

               ~ Anne Lamott

 

 

I would probably start from scratch with a full reformat.

It works much better and ensures things are in place.

An upgrade, not sure if you still can without buying another copy of windows, there is rumor that if you put your old win8 or 7 licence key into the change product key box in settings that its going to work but I have never tried it so I don't know.

Why I say this is that when I upgraded first to win10 from7, everything worked as expected, that was till I had to reformat due to slowness in the pc.

I descovered annoyingly that both part of the photo software for my webcam and my dvd recording drivers were not compattible with win10 at all.

After several reformats to get them working, I ended up after working all night finding out that they didn't work.

As a result while the system does work I have 2 bits of software that no longer work or can be safely installed.

Worse, I don't have the funds to replace them with propper software, I have found opensource alternitives to these for the sighted users and such but even so they are not the same.

Sometimes upgrading can hide issues till you try to reinstall.

On 12/5/2018 6:15 AM, Ján Kulik wrote:
But I am interested in the installation of windows 10. I have learned from one user that I have 2 choices. The first option is to upgrade, the second option is to update them only. There is a shortcut key win + enter for the case if I know the status of the installation via Microsoft Narator. And I also understand correctly that old drivers will be uninstalled and reinstalled with the programs included in the operating system. Or am I wrong?


Ján Kulik
 

Well, wait, I'd rather buy a Windows 10 CD? Because I don't know if I
need to buy a product key when I upgrade or upgrade. When I reinstalled
from Windows 8 to Windows 8.1, I don't need any product key activation
code. As for the end of Windows 8 support in 8.1, in 2023, it seems to
me that it is really going to end or remain.

 

There are no Windows 10 CDs/DVDs.  Microsoft long ago stopped producing media in favor of downloading.  That's why there is the Microsoft Windows 10 Download Page which includes both the Update Assistant (Update Now button) and the Media Creation Tool in case one wants to create a bootable USB or download the Windows 10 ISO file to create optical media.

If one does an in-place upgrade from Windows 7, 8, or 8.1 there is no need for any product key.  Your existing license gets converted to a Windows 10 license.  I just did an in-place Windows 7 to Windows 10 upgrade exactly 2 weeks ago, and I have no reason to believe that it will not still allow such.

Again, just because some of us have had issues after in-place upgrades many others of us have not.  Why, oh why, would one want to put oneself through all the extra work of Doing a Completely Clean Install of Windows 10 unless one tested out an in-place upgrade first?!  If one needs to do it secondary to slowness or other issues it is not difficult to do, and the machine will already be licensed for Windows 10 so that issue is out of the way.  But if one does not then a great deal of effort has been saved in getting one's computer back to being as one likes it, with the software one is used to installed.

Although there have been issues with older software on the whole these are few and far between.  Issues with device drivers for what I would call legacy hardware, and I do mean produced generally prior to the Windows 7 era, do persist but are not a concern unless one has legacy hardware.  Many don't.

Putting the cart before the horse seems to be very popular when it comes to Windows 10 and upgrading to it.  I'd rather not, as one can do what's necessary after there is actual indication it is necessary rather than doing a preemptive wipe the slate clean.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

     You can safely assume you've created God in your own image when it turns out that God hates all the same people you do.

               ~ Anne Lamott

 

Sarah k Alawami
 

Exactly, which is why I recommend a complete reinstall if you can. Or upgrade i place then reformat later if you can. I do this to all of my windows and mac machines I've ever owned. In fact I read a windows xp for dummies book and it even recommended doingn this in 2002.

On 4 Dec 2018, at 10:17, Shaun Everiss wrote:

I would probably start from scratch with a full reformat.

It works much better and ensures things are in place.

An upgrade, not sure if you still can without buying another copy of windows, there is rumor that if you put your old win8 or 7 licence key into the change product key box in settings that its going to work but I have never tried it so I don't know.

Why I say this is that when I upgraded first to win10 from7, everything worked as expected, that was till I had to reformat due to slowness in the pc.

I descovered annoyingly that both part of the photo software for my webcam and my dvd recording drivers were not compattible with win10 at all.

After several reformats to get them working, I ended up after working all night finding out that they didn't work.

As a result while the system does work I have 2 bits of software that no longer work or can be safely installed.

Worse, I don't have the funds to replace them with propper software, I have found opensource alternitives to these for the sighted users and such but even so they are not the same.

Sometimes upgrading can hide issues till you try to reinstall.

On 12/5/2018 6:15 AM, Ján Kulik wrote: > But I am interested in the installation of windows 10. I have learned > from one user that I have 2 choices. The first option is to upgrade, > the second option is to update them only. There is a shortcut key win > + enter for the case if I know the status of the installation via > Microsoft Narator. And I also understand correctly that old drivers > will be uninstalled and reinstalled with the programs included in the > operating system. Or am I wrong? > > > >

 

Well your win8 update code should still work but you can buy windows 10.

The easiest way is to probably download it to usb or cd yourself well dvd, then from windows 10 itself you can probably buy it pro is good but you can buy it from a store to.

On 12/5/2018 7:35 AM, Ján Kulik wrote:
Well, wait, I'd rather buy a Windows 10 CD? Because I don't know if I
need to buy a product key when I upgrade or upgrade. When I reinstalled
from Windows 8 to Windows 8.1, I don't need any product key activation
code. As for the end of Windows 8 support in 8.1, in 2023, it seems to
me that it is really going to end or remain.




Kevin
 

narrator shortcut key is ctrl+win key+enter in win 10

 

E-mail is golden!!!
Kevin Lee

 

From: Ján Kulik
Sent: Tuesday, December 4, 2018 9:15 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Upgrade windows 8.1 to windows 10

 

But I am interested in the installation of windows 10. I have learned from one user that I have 2 choices. The first option is to upgrade, the second option is to update them only. There is a shortcut key win + enter for the case if I know the status of the installation via Microsoft Narator. And I also understand correctly that old drivers will be uninstalled and reinstalled with the programs included in the operating system. Or am I wrong?