Topics

quick assist in windows10

Moty Azrad
 

Dear friends,

 

I tried today to create connection between my win10 pc and a friend who has the same system.

I’m blind and he is not.

When he tried to control my pc, he could do it with this QUICK ASSIST.

When I tried to control his pc, I created successfully the connection but can not control his pc.

My question:

Is quick assist accessible for Jaws or NVDA BLIND USERS?

 

Any output is much appreciated.

 

Thanks

 

Moti

 

 

Moti Azrad 

Musician and Piano-Tuner         

 

motiaz@...

 

azrad_moty@...

 

Israel

 

 

 

 

Sarah k Alawami
 

No I don't think it is. And if it is you wold need to hear the other screen reader over a phone or what not.

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On 26 Jun 2020, at 9:25, Moty Azrad wrote:

Dear friends,

 

I tried today to create connection between my win10 pc and a friend who has the same system.

I’m blind and he is not.

When he tried to control my pc, he could do it with this QUICK ASSIST.

When I tried to control his pc, I created successfully the connection but can not control his pc.

My question:

Is quick assist accessible for Jaws or NVDA BLIND USERS?

 

Any output is much appreciated.

 

Thanks

 

Moti

 

 

Moti Azrad 

Musician and Piano-Tuner         

 

motiaz@...

 

azrad_moty@...

 

Israel

 

 

 

 

 

Quick Assist can absolutely be used by a sighted assistant working with a blind or visually-impaired client, and I have done so repeatedly.  Since I have never attempted to have a blind client be the person giving assistance, I cannot definitively say whether the remote session on their end would be accessible to a screen reader, but I seriously doubt it.  I don't know of any regular remote support tools that are fully screen reader accessible on the side of the person giving assistance.  On the side of the person getting assistance things are very largely "as normal" and if a screen reader is in use it will narrate what the person controlling the computer remotely is doing.

Quick Assist always has "two sides" when creating a connection:  One for the person offering assistance, the other for the person requesting assistance.  Each has to enter their respective Quick Assist session indicating the role they need.  The person offering assistance will be given a 6-digit numeric code that the person requesting assistance must enter to establish the exchange, then the person giving assistance can choose whether they want only to see the screen on the assistee's side or wishes to be granted full control.  That choice is then indicated to the person requesting assistance and must be consented to before the ability to see the screen (and control the computer, if requested) is available to the person providing assistance.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363

Life is the art of drawing sufficient conclusions from insufficient premises.

         ~ Samuel Butler, 1835-1902

 

As an aside, if I were the blind individual giving assistance, I'd use something like NVDA Remote, and have the sighted side either install NVDA long enough to allow that or to run a portable copy to allow it.  I do not know how NVDA Remote and a portable copy of NVDA interact, or even if they can.  There is certainly someone here who can answer that question definitively.

JAWS is a trickier business because, under usual circumstances, someone who does not typically use it and does not have a license could only run it in 40-minute mode.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363

Life is the art of drawing sufficient conclusions from insufficient premises.

         ~ Samuel Butler, 1835-1902

tim
 

If you have sight then it just like standard windows remote is useable.
However, if no sight using a screen reader then like Sarah stated no.
You would be better off using NVDA, because its free and if sighted person didn’t want it on there computer they can just delete it.
Jaws Tandom is ok if you own jaws. The problem there is you have to both run same version.

On Jun 26, 2020, at 1:12 PM, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

As an aside, if I were the blind individual giving assistance, I'd use something like NVDA Remote, and have the sighted side either install NVDA long enough to allow that or to run a portable copy to allow it.  I do not know how NVDA Remote and a portable copy of NVDA interact, or even if they can.  There is certainly someone here who can answer that question definitively.

JAWS is a trickier business because, under usual circumstances, someone who does not typically use it and does not have a license could only run it in 40-minute mode.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363

Life is the art of drawing sufficient conclusions from insufficient premises.

         ~ Samuel Butler, 1835-1902


adam morris
 

Hi Tim,
the person controlling the tandem session has to have the later version than the target.
The controller can have v19 and the target has v16 just as long as the controlling version is a higher number.




On 27/06/2020 03:28, tim wrote:
If you have sight then it just like standard windows remote is useable.
However, if no sight using a screen reader then like Sarah stated no.
You would be better off using NVDA, because its free and if sighted person didn’t want it on there computer they can just delete it.
Jaws Tandom is ok if you own jaws. The problem there is you have to both run same version.

Tim M



On Jun 26, 2020, at 1:12 PM, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

As an aside, if I were the blind individual giving assistance, I'd use something like NVDA Remote, and have the sighted side either install NVDA long enough to allow that or to run a portable copy to allow it.  I do not know how NVDA Remote and a portable copy of NVDA interact, or even if they can.  There is certainly someone here who can answer that question definitively.

JAWS is a trickier business because, under usual circumstances, someone who does not typically use it and does not have a license could only run it in 40-minute mode.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363

Life is the art of drawing sufficient conclusions from insufficient premises.

         ~ Samuel Butler, 1835-1902



-- 

Adam Morris
Email, iMessage & FaceTime 
adam@...

 

On Fri, Jun 26, 2020 at 07:26 PM, adam morris wrote:
the person controlling the tandem session has to have the later version than the target.
-
A most useful data point to have.  Now filed in with all the other "mental lint."
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363

Life is the art of drawing sufficient conclusions from insufficient premises.

         ~ Samuel Butler, 1835-1902

chris judge
 

I don’t think so. I tried it once, and unless I missed something it didn’t work for me.

 

Chris Judge

 

JAWS Certified, 2020

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Moty Azrad
Sent: June 26, 2020 1:25 PM
To: Win10 List <win10@win10.groups.io>
Subject: [win10] quick assist in windows10

 

Dear friends,

 

I tried today to create connection between my win10 pc and a friend who has the same system.

I’m blind and he is not.

When he tried to control my pc, he could do it with this QUICK ASSIST.

When I tried to control his pc, I created successfully the connection but can not control his pc.

My question:

Is quick assist accessible for Jaws or NVDA BLIND USERS?

 

Any output is much appreciated.

 

Thanks

 

Moti

 

 

Moti Azrad 

Musician and Piano-Tuner         

 

motiaz@...

 

azrad_moty@...

 

Israel

 

 

 

 

Kelly Ford
 

Hi,

 

I have used Quick Assist to provide assistance and I am a screen reading user.  It is not a straight forward process to be clear because the sound form the remote computer is not send over.

 

The short version of how to do this is to have the person you are assisting also join one of the meeting services that allows for screen sharing and have them share the screen there and include system audio.

 

I wrote this experience up in greater detail at:

 

http://theideaplace.net/using-windows-quick-assist-with-a-screen-reader/

 

Kelly

 

 

From: <win10@win10.groups.io> on behalf of "Brian Vogel via groups.io" <britechguy@...>
Reply-To: "win10@win10.groups.io" <win10@win10.groups.io>
Date: Friday, June 26, 2020 at 12:09 PM
To: "win10@win10.groups.io" <win10@win10.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [win10] quick assist in windows10

 

Quick Assist can absolutely be used by a sighted assistant working with a blind or visually-impaired client, and I have done so repeatedly.  Since I have never attempted to have a blind client be the person giving assistance, I cannot definitively say whether the remote session on their end would be accessible to a screen reader, but I seriously doubt it.  I don't know of any regular remote support tools that are fully screen reader accessible on the side of the person giving assistance.  On the side of the person getting assistance things are very largely "as normal" and if a screen reader is in use it will narrate what the person controlling the computer remotely is doing.

Quick Assist always has "two sides" when creating a connection:  One for the person offering assistance, the other for the person requesting assistance.  Each has to enter their respective Quick Assist session indicating the role they need.  The person offering assistance will be given a 6-digit numeric code that the person requesting assistance must enter to establish the exchange, then the person giving assistance can choose whether they want only to see the screen on the assistee's side or wishes to be granted full control.  That choice is then indicated to the person requesting assistance and must be consented to before the ability to see the screen (and control the computer, if requested) is available to the person providing assistance.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363

Life is the art of drawing sufficient conclusions from insufficient premises.

         ~ Samuel Butler, 1835-1902