Topics

New PC setup?


Clement Chou
 

Hi all. I just got my new Del XPS 8940 gaming desktop today, and am
going to set it up tomorrow. IS there anything I should be careful to
do, or not to do? I haven't set up a new pc in years, so any help is
appreciated. I've also been told that a smart thing to do might be to
immediately do a clean windows install before really doing anything
with it, but I also have no idea how to really go about doing that. Is
the whole process for both set up and clean install accessible using
narrator if I use the headset jack which I assume will work without me
having to prompt it? I would just hate to accidentally lose sound in
the middle of it with no sighted assistance around to help. Thanks!
And any other tips I didn't think of to ask about are welcome too!


Russell James
 

Most of the Dell computers come with a recovery partition that will allow you to reinstall the original manufacturers installation of windows with all of the specific drivers

I don't understand the need for doing a clean windows install when you first get the computer maybe you can explain more


Hamit Campos
 

Ah I thought you were gona go Aurora. But any who. Sure well I was going to say once all is installed and setup I'd go to the Dell support site grab once it detects it your service tag and express code and make notes of them. Especially the service tag it's the easier 1. Download all drivers and so on. As to the cleen install for the person that asked why do it. Well to each his own. But here's why. Some and let me stress that some would rather clean up the PC and just have it as just a Windows pure PC. Trouble with this is sure you get rid of the trial of Macaffy sure you get rid of what ever else in this case Dell may have installed there. But oops, say bie bie to to the Siberlink software for your DVD writer to play DVDs or BDs if you got it with a BD writer as I did. Point is you choose. But there are things configurations and other reasons I would not personally do that. Again as I said before to each his own. Another thing I'd do if you were to adjust the sleep plan for instance, is make notes of the original settings. Now I know most hate Windows Media Player. I use it because of SRS Wow. So I made notes of the original slider settings for that too. As for the recovery partition. True it's there but Dell to make you spend an extra 20 bucks doesn't as I'm sure you've noticed give you your Win 10 DVD. You'd need it to use that partition me thinks. Brian if you've delt with a new Dell starting from 2014 please let me know if I'm wrong here but I remember this being the case with the Inspiron 3847 tower I replaced with the XPS. Other than that I'd just watch your self where you save stuff. Just remember to where you can choose the data drive. Or when you download things if it asks you where you want to save choose the Data drive where possible again. If you use ITunes relocate your library to that data drive if you want. Remember that's where things get put away. That's that for now. If I think of other stuff I'll let ya know but I think this is where I'd start.

-----Original Message-----
From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Clement Chou
Sent: Monday, January 11, 2021 3:01 AM
To: win10 <win10@win10.groups.io>
Subject: [win10] New PC setup?

Hi all. I just got my new Del XPS 8940 gaming desktop today, and am going to set it up tomorrow. IS there anything I should be careful to do, or not to do? I haven't set up a new pc in years, so any help is appreciated. I've also been told that a smart thing to do might be to immediately do a clean windows install before really doing anything with it, but I also have no idea how to really go about doing that. Is the whole process for both set up and clean install accessible using narrator if I use the headset jack which I assume will work without me having to prompt it? I would just hate to accidentally lose sound in the middle of it with no sighted assistance around to help. Thanks!
And any other tips I didn't think of to ask about are welcome too!


 

On Mon, Jan 11, 2021 at 08:49 AM, Russell James wrote:
I don't understand the need for doing a clean windows install when you first get the computer maybe you can explain more
-
First, let me note, I do not do this as standard practice.  I'd rather weed out the manufacturer supplied "optional software" (often bloatware) on my own from Control Panel, Programs and Features, rather than Doing a Completely Clean (Re)install of Windows 10 Using Media Creation Tool to Create Bootable Win10 Install Media on a USB Thumb Drive.

That being said, there are many who do a completely clean reinstall of Windows 10 immediately because it gives you the cleanest, most "de-bloated," version of Windows 10 that's available.  And given how good Windows 10 has become in having the correct drivers to pull from in The Great Microsoft Driver Library in the Cloud because most manufacturers are supplying them with same, the worries from the old days about driver reinstalls are, for the most part, unnecessary.

It's really a matter of personal preference, and mine is not to do a completely clean reinstall, while others prefer to do one.  Neither is wrong, and which is better is entirely a matter of perspective and personal preference.

As for the manufacturer recovery partitions, for the most part they're obsolete almost upon arrival.  Once you've had a couple of Windows 10 Feature Updates, driver updates over time, lots of software installations, etc., it makes no sense to go back to whatever was on the computer when it was new.  If one were to need to do a "nuke and pave" at a much later point in time then a completely clean reinstall with the install media for the current Windows 10 release version is the only way to go.

That is but one of the reasons why having a backup plan that includes a full system image as well as separate user data backup(s) should be considered standard practice if you care anything about both your time and your data.  It's so much easier to restore from a backup than to start from scratch if something goes really wrong.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

Journalism 101:  If someone says it’s raining and another person says it’s dry, it’s not your job to quote them both. It’s your job to look out the f**king window and find out which is true.

      ~ Jonathan Foster (attributed)


Clement Chou
 

Thanks Brian. That was my thinking as well, to get rid of all the
extra drivers and bloatware I don't really want to have lying around.
But if that can be done through control pannel then I may take that
approach rather than reinstalling the whole thing from scratch as I'm
not as comfortable yet with working in a pre-installation environment.
I would like to learn, however. I'll check out the file you linked for
sure! The possibility of wiping everything and starting with a
completely clean slate before starting to use it also has a bit of
apeal. What are your thoughts on system imaging and tools for creating
those and user backups?
I'm also curious as to where narrator starts working. When I press
f12 for the boot menu, can narrator be started there? Or do I have to
wait until after I've selected the boot media?

On 1/11/21, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
On Mon, Jan 11, 2021 at 08:49 AM, Russell James wrote:


I don't understand the need for doing a clean windows install when you
first get the computer maybe you can explain more
-
First, let me note, I do not do this as standard practice.  I'd rather weed
out the manufacturer supplied "optional software" (often bloatware) on my
own from Control Panel, Programs and Features, rather than *Doing a
Completely Clean (Re)install of Windows 10 Using Media Creation Tool to
Create Bootable Win10 Install Media on a USB Thumb Drive.* (
https://drive.google.com/uc?export=download&;id=1XBakbeS4WYPN3-O5ET5HIQO_Qey-g3XK
)

That being said, there are many who do a completely clean reinstall of
Windows 10 immediately because it gives you the cleanest, most "de-bloated,"
version of Windows 10 that's available.  And given how good Windows 10 has
become in having the correct drivers to pull from in The Great Microsoft
Driver Library in the Cloud because most manufacturers are supplying them
with same, the worries from the old days about driver reinstalls are, for
the most part, unnecessary.

It's really a matter of personal preference, and mine is not to do a
completely clean reinstall, while others prefer to do one.  Neither is
wrong, and which is better is entirely a matter of perspective and personal
preference.

As for the manufacturer recovery partitions, for the most part they're
obsolete almost upon arrival.  Once you've had a couple of Windows 10
Feature Updates, driver updates over time, lots of software installations,
etc., it makes no sense to go back to whatever was on the computer when it
was new.  If one were to need to do a "nuke and pave" at a much later point
in time then a completely clean reinstall with the install media for the
current Windows 10 release version is the only way to go.

That is but one of the reasons why having a backup plan that includes a full
system image as well as separate user data backup(s) should be considered
standard practice if you care anything about both your time and your data.
It's so much easier to restore from a backup than to start from scratch if
something goes really wrong.
--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

Journalism 101: *If someone says it’s raining and another person says it’s
dry, it’s not your job to quote them both. It’s your job to look out the
f**king window and find out which is true.*

~ Jonathan Foster (attributed)






 

Hi,
You need to wait until Windows Setup is loaded before starting Narrator, as no screen reader (or for that matter, no Windows app) is compatible with the firmware interface.
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Clement Chou
Sent: Monday, January 11, 2021 8:53 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] New PC setup?

Thanks Brian. That was my thinking as well, to get rid of all the extra drivers and bloatware I don't really want to have lying around.
But if that can be done through control pannel then I may take that approach rather than reinstalling the whole thing from scratch as I'm not as comfortable yet with working in a pre-installation environment.
I would like to learn, however. I'll check out the file you linked for sure! The possibility of wiping everything and starting with a completely clean slate before starting to use it also has a bit of apeal. What are your thoughts on system imaging and tools for creating those and user backups?
I'm also curious as to where narrator starts working. When I press
f12 for the boot menu, can narrator be started there? Or do I have to wait until after I've selected the boot media?

On 1/11/21, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
On Mon, Jan 11, 2021 at 08:49 AM, Russell James wrote:


I don't understand the need for doing a clean windows install when
you first get the computer maybe you can explain more
-
First, let me note, I do not do this as standard practice. I'd rather
weed out the manufacturer supplied "optional software" (often
bloatware) on my own from Control Panel, Programs and Features, rather
than *Doing a Completely Clean (Re)install of Windows 10 Using Media
Creation Tool to Create Bootable Win10 Install Media on a USB Thumb
Drive.* (
https://drive.google.com/uc?export=download&;id=1XBakbeS4WYPN3-O5ET5HIQ
O_Qey-g3XK
)

That being said, there are many who do a completely clean reinstall of
Windows 10 immediately because it gives you the cleanest, most "de-bloated,"
version of Windows 10 that's available. And given how good Windows 10
has become in having the correct drivers to pull from in The Great
Microsoft Driver Library in the Cloud because most manufacturers are
supplying them with same, the worries from the old days about driver
reinstalls are, for the most part, unnecessary.

It's really a matter of personal preference, and mine is not to do a
completely clean reinstall, while others prefer to do one. Neither is
wrong, and which is better is entirely a matter of perspective and
personal preference.

As for the manufacturer recovery partitions, for the most part they're
obsolete almost upon arrival. Once you've had a couple of Windows 10
Feature Updates, driver updates over time, lots of software
installations, etc., it makes no sense to go back to whatever was on
the computer when it was new. If one were to need to do a "nuke and
pave" at a much later point in time then a completely clean reinstall
with the install media for the current Windows 10 release version is the only way to go.

That is but one of the reasons why having a backup plan that includes
a full system image as well as separate user data backup(s) should be
considered standard practice if you care anything about both your time and your data.
It's so much easier to restore from a backup than to start from
scratch if something goes really wrong.
--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

Journalism 101: *If someone says it’s raining and another person says
it’s dry, it’s not your job to quote them both. It’s your job to look
out the f**king window and find out which is true.*

~ Jonathan Foster (attributed)






Clement Chou
 

Good to know. Thanks Joseph. I suppose this means I have to get
sighted help booting from the USB drive if I decide to go that route.?
This does seem a bit more involved than I thought, so I might wait
until I learn a bit more about how to do it. But I may do whatBrian
suggested and just manually remove the extra junk.

On 1/11/21, Joseph Lee <joseph.lee22590@gmail.com> wrote:
Hi,
You need to wait until Windows Setup is loaded before starting Narrator, as
no screen reader (or for that matter, no Windows app) is compatible with the
firmware interface.
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Clement
Chou
Sent: Monday, January 11, 2021 8:53 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] New PC setup?

Thanks Brian. That was my thinking as well, to get rid of all the extra
drivers and bloatware I don't really want to have lying around.
But if that can be done through control pannel then I may take that approach
rather than reinstalling the whole thing from scratch as I'm not as
comfortable yet with working in a pre-installation environment.
I would like to learn, however. I'll check out the file you linked for sure!
The possibility of wiping everything and starting with a completely clean
slate before starting to use it also has a bit of apeal. What are your
thoughts on system imaging and tools for creating those and user backups?
I'm also curious as to where narrator starts working. When I press
f12 for the boot menu, can narrator be started there? Or do I have to wait
until after I've selected the boot media?

On 1/11/21, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
On Mon, Jan 11, 2021 at 08:49 AM, Russell James wrote:


I don't understand the need for doing a clean windows install when
you first get the computer maybe you can explain more
-
First, let me note, I do not do this as standard practice. I'd rather
weed out the manufacturer supplied "optional software" (often
bloatware) on my own from Control Panel, Programs and Features, rather
than *Doing a Completely Clean (Re)install of Windows 10 Using Media
Creation Tool to Create Bootable Win10 Install Media on a USB Thumb
Drive.* (
https://drive.google.com/uc?export=download&;id=1XBakbeS4WYPN3-O5ET5HIQ
O_Qey-g3XK
)

That being said, there are many who do a completely clean reinstall of
Windows 10 immediately because it gives you the cleanest, most
"de-bloated,"
version of Windows 10 that's available. And given how good Windows 10
has become in having the correct drivers to pull from in The Great
Microsoft Driver Library in the Cloud because most manufacturers are
supplying them with same, the worries from the old days about driver
reinstalls are, for the most part, unnecessary.

It's really a matter of personal preference, and mine is not to do a
completely clean reinstall, while others prefer to do one. Neither is
wrong, and which is better is entirely a matter of perspective and
personal preference.

As for the manufacturer recovery partitions, for the most part they're
obsolete almost upon arrival. Once you've had a couple of Windows 10
Feature Updates, driver updates over time, lots of software
installations, etc., it makes no sense to go back to whatever was on
the computer when it was new. If one were to need to do a "nuke and
pave" at a much later point in time then a completely clean reinstall
with the install media for the current Windows 10 release version is the
only way to go.

That is but one of the reasons why having a backup plan that includes
a full system image as well as separate user data backup(s) should be
considered standard practice if you care anything about both your time and
your data.
It's so much easier to restore from a backup than to start from
scratch if something goes really wrong.
--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

Journalism 101: *If someone says it’s raining and another person says
it’s dry, it’s not your job to quote them both. It’s your job to look
out the f**king window and find out which is true.*

~ Jonathan Foster (attributed)















 

Clement,

           As Joseph has already noted, the firmware interface (UEFI/BIOS) does not have screen reader access and it's unlikely it ever will.  My instructions note that you need to change the boot order if you use the "completely clean install" instructions and there's no way to generically describe how that's done as it is specific to a given BIOS/UEFI used on a given motherboard.

           Now, the above being said, if you wanted to do the equivalent of a completely clean reinstall on a Windows 10 system that currently boots, you could use the instructions for Doing a Windows 10 Repair Install or Feature Update Using the Windows 10 ISO file. These instructions explicitly tell you to make sure the "keep apps and files" option is chosen, which is what you'd want for a repair install or feature update.  But, at the point where you check this, you do have the option to keep nothing, which is what you'd want to do if you wanted a fresh install of the version of Windows 10 for the ISO file you've downloaded.  You could also use one of the built-in options to reset Windows 10, but I prefer the ISO file method as I know I've got everything necessary for the process to complete even if internet service is interrupted before I even kick it off.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

Journalism 101:  If someone says it’s raining and another person says it’s dry, it’s not your job to quote them both. It’s your job to look out the f**king window and find out which is true.

      ~ Jonathan Foster (attributed)


g melconian
 

Maybe they are trying to  get rid of the extra  ad ons  that  some of these consumer grade pc’s come with compared to the business grade or business class ones. I don’t know what the person has gotten. So I cant comment but that would be what I would be suspecting as these consumer grades,  tend to  bundle other  thing s with their Windows 10 pc installations. 

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Russell James
Sent: Monday, January 11, 2021 5:49 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] New PC setup?

 

Most of the Dell computers come with a recovery partition that will allow you to reinstall the original manufacturers installation of windows with all of the specific drivers

I don't understand the need for doing a clean windows install when you first get the computer maybe you can explain more