Topics

In-Place Upgrade from Windows 7, 8, or 8.1 - Still Possible in November 2020


Billy Inglis
 

hi guys, I have an elderly lady friend running windows7 and jaws.
She is now asking if it would be possible for her as a blind elderly user to upgrade to windows10?.
The question must be would it be possible for her to upgrade from 7 to 10, and how would she achieve this task?.

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Richard Kuzma
 

good morning,
you can do an what is called an in place upgrade from 7 to 10 but you have to be carefull what version of jaws she has.
I would do an image backup so way in case it all goes to pot and then you can just restore and then try again.
I did it once or twice testing things and it did go ok.
let me know if I can be of any more help.
also, don’t forget narrator is thre in ten if she gets in a bind.

-----Original Message-----
From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Billy Inglis
Sent: Wednesday, November 11, 2020 4:04 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: [win10] upgrade?

hi guys, I have an elderly lady friend running windows7 and jaws.
She is now asking if it would be possible for her as a blind elderly user to upgrade to windows10?.
The question must be would it be possible for her to upgrade from 7 to 10, and how would she achieve this task?.

--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


Billy Inglis
 

hi Richard, thanks for the prompt reply.
My friend is elderly and is not technically minded.
She would not be able to do what you suggest, but thanks anyway.

On 11/11/2020 10:40, Richard Kuzma via groups.io wrote:
good morning,
you can do an what is called an in place upgrade from 7 to 10 but you have to be carefull what version of jaws she has.
I would do an image backup so way in case it all goes to pot and then you can just restore and then try again.
I did it once or twice testing things and it did go ok.
let me know if I can be of any more help.
also, don’t forget narrator is thre in ten if she gets in a bind.
-----Original Message-----
From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Billy Inglis
Sent: Wednesday, November 11, 2020 4:04 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: [win10] upgrade?
hi guys, I have an elderly lady friend running windows7 and jaws.
She is now asking if it would be possible for her as a blind elderly user to upgrade to windows10?.
The question must be would it be possible for her to upgrade from 7 to 10, and how would she achieve this task?.
--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


 

Billy,

           See my other reply to your question.  Someone who's blind can absolutely do this independently, but it takes time.  And I've already echoed Mr. Kuzma in regard to the need to do a full system image backup of any system before trying an in-place upgrade.

           I've actually never had one fail catastrophically, but I think I've had two that failed and then rolled everything back.  But I know of catastrophic failures, so if you want 100% safety in doing an in-place upgrade you take a full system image backup first.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041
The purpose of education is not to validate ignorance but to overcome it. 
       ~ Lawrence Krauss


 

Repost of message from other topic, and retitling of this topic for archival purposes.

------------------------------
Billy,

            See:  Doing a Windows 10 Repair Install or Feature Update Using the Windows 10 ISO file

            The steps for doing an in-place upgrade are precisely the same, except that all steps prior to kicking off the setup.exe file are happening under Windows 7, not Windows 10.

             I would not recommend doing this upgrade without having first taken a full system image backup of her existing Windows 7 installation.   She will not be able to follow the progress of the upgrade unless she kicks off Narrator a few minutes after kicking off setup.exe, but you can do that now so that you do have some idea of how far along the upgrade is.  No matter how good the machine is as far as tech specs go, an in-place upgrade from an earlier version of Windows to Windows 10 is not a fast process.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041
The purpose of education is not to validate ignorance but to overcome it. 
       ~ Lawrence Krauss


 

you cant do a in place upgrade from windows 7

On 11/11/20, Brian Vogel <@britechguy> wrote:
Repost of message from other topic, and retitling of this topic for archival
purposes.

------------------------------
Billy,

See: Doing a Windows 10 Repair Install or Feature Update Using the Windows
10 ISO file (
https://drive.google.com/uc?export=download&id=1RZiHlLVtXewYBgoSvJNm9_08hj1tALPK
)

The steps for doing an in-place upgrade are precisely the same, except that
all steps prior to kicking off the setup.exe file are happening under
Windows 7, not Windows 10.

I would not recommend doing this upgrade without having first taken a full
system image backup of her existing Windows 7 installation.   She will not
be able to follow the progress of the upgrade unless she kicks off Narrator
a few minutes after kicking off setup.exe, but you can do that now so that
you do have some idea of how far along the upgrade is.  No matter how good
the machine is as far as tech specs go, an in-place upgrade from an earlier
version of Windows to Windows 10 is not a fast process.
--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041
The purpose of education is not to validate ignorance but to overcome it.
~ Lawrence Krauss





--
search for me on facebook, google+, orkut..
@austin
follow me on twitter.
austinmpinto
contact me on skype.
austin.pinto3


 

from what i know. a in place upgrade from windows 7 to windows 10 will
not be possible.

On 11/11/20, Brian Vogel <@britechguy> wrote:
Billy,

See my other reply to your question.  Someone who's blind can absolutely do
this independently, but it takes time.  And I've already echoed Mr. Kuzma in
regard to the need to do a full system image backup of any system before
trying an in-place upgrade.

I've actually never had one fail catastrophically, but I think I've had two
that failed and then rolled everything back.  But I know of catastrophic
failures, so if you want 100% safety in doing an in-place upgrade you take a
full system image backup first.

--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041
The purpose of education is not to validate ignorance but to overcome it.
~ Lawrence Krauss





--
search for me on facebook, google+, orkut..
@austin
follow me on twitter.
austinmpinto
contact me on skype.
austin.pinto3


 

On Wed, Nov 11, 2020 at 10:55 PM, Austin Pinto wrote:
a in place upgrade from windows 7 to windows 10 will
not be possible.
-
And that would be incorrect.  Period. End of sentence.

The in-place upgrade, at no cost, continues to work just like it did in 2015.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041
The purpose of education is not to validate ignorance but to overcome it. 
       ~ Lawrence Krauss


 

On Wed, Nov 11, 2020 at 10:54 PM, Austin Pinto wrote:
you cant do a in place upgrade from windows 7
-
Yes, Austin, you absolutely can.  I've done dozens of them.  Please do not keep repeating that you cannot, because you can.  You can also do so from Windows 8 or 8.1.

What Microsoft announced, and what still works in practice, are not the same, and haven't been since the so-called cutoff date in 2016.  They still work.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041
The purpose of education is not to validate ignorance but to overcome it. 
       ~ Lawrence Krauss


 

Here's how you can still get a free Windows 10 upgrade

Tip: You can still upgrade from Windows 7 to Windows 10 for free

How to Upgrade to Windows 10 From Windows 7 for Free

Free Upgrades from Windows 7 to Windows 10 Still Working in February 2020

Windows 7 is dead, but you can still upgrade to Windows 10 for free – here’s how to get it

And plenty more can be found via web search.  Look at the date on the first linked article, which is late September 2020.  And the most recent one I know of, done by a tech I know on one of the other forums on which I participate, was less than 2 weeks ago.

Given how much Microsoft still wants to get all Windows users using Windows 10, I have my doubts that this will ever be dropped as an option.

 

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041
The purpose of education is not to validate ignorance but to overcome it. 
       ~ Lawrence Krauss


Billy Inglis
 

hi again Brian, as explained the
blind lady in question is not good with computer technology and would find it so difficult. Can you advise please?.

On 11/11/2020 15:35, Brian Vogel wrote:
Billy,
           See my other reply to your question.  Someone who's blind can absolutely do this independently, but it takes time.  And I've already echoed Mr. Kuzma in regard to the need to do a full system image backup of any system before trying an in-place upgrade.
           I've actually never had one fail catastrophically, but I think I've had two that failed and then rolled everything back.  But I know of catastrophic failures, so if you want 100% safety in doing an in-place upgrade you take a full system image backup first.
--
Brian *-*Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041
/The purpose of education is not to validate ignorance but to overcome it./
       ~ Lawrence Krauss
--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


Billy Inglis
 

hi Brian, i am not sure she could do this, but thanks anyway.

On 11/11/2020 15:38, Brian Vogel wrote:
Repost of message from other topic, and retitling of this topic for archival purposes.
------------------------------
Billy,
            See: Doing a Windows 10 Repair Install or Feature Update Using the Windows 10 ISO file <https://drive.google.com/uc?export=download&id=1RZiHlLVtXewYBgoSvJNm9_08hj1tALPK>
            The steps for doing an in-place upgrade are precisely the same, except that all steps prior to kicking off the setup.exe file are happening under Windows 7, not Windows 10.
             I would not recommend doing this upgrade without having first taken a full system image backup of her existing Windows 7 installation.   She will not be able to follow the progress of the upgrade unless she kicks off Narrator a few minutes after kicking off setup.exe, but you can do that now so that you do have some idea of how far along the upgrade is.  No matter how good the machine is as far as tech specs go, an in-place upgrade from an earlier version of Windows to Windows 10 is not a fast process.
--
Brian *-*Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041
/The purpose of education is not to validate ignorance but to overcome it./
       ~ Lawrence Krauss
--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


 

On Thu, Nov 12, 2020 at 07:28 AM, Billy Inglis wrote:
i am not sure she could do this, but thanks anyway.
-
You're welcome.  When it comes to what any given individual is willing and/or able to do, they have to make that assessment themselves.

You can definitely get through the initial parts of the setup while you're still using whatever screen reader it is that you have going, and then walk away and check back some hours later.  I most often kick off in-place upgrades before going to bed, answering the initial few questions until you reach the, "this will take hours of working on the part of the computer," stage.

The next morning you virtually always have one of two outcomes:  You've got a successful Windows 10 upgrade or the machine has rolled back to whatever version of Windows you were trying to upgrade from.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041
The purpose of education is not to validate ignorance but to overcome it. 
       ~ Lawrence Krauss


 

On Thu, Nov 12, 2020 at 07:26 AM, Billy Inglis wrote:
the blind lady in question is not good with computer technology and would find it so difficult. Can you advise please?.
-
I say the following without a trace of either snark nor anger:  Hire someone.

If an individual can't or won't do something, and another individual in their circle who might be able to do so can't or won't, that's the only other option.

Upgrades don't happen automagically and someone has to do the bits to kick them off and check if they've completed.  Who that is will be dictated entirely by the specific circumstances.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041
The purpose of education is not to validate ignorance but to overcome it. 
       ~ Lawrence Krauss


Richard Kuzma
 

Good afternoon,

She might want to get a sighted friend to help and then someone could direct her over the phone

 

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io [mailto:win10@win10.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Thursday, November 12, 2020 12:21 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] In-Place Upgrade from Windows 7, 8, or 8.1 - Still Possible in November 2020

 

On Thu, Nov 12, 2020 at 07:28 AM, Billy Inglis wrote:

i am not sure she could do this, but thanks anyway.

-
You're welcome.  When it comes to what any given individual is willing and/or able to do, they have to make that assessment themselves.

You can definitely get through the initial parts of the setup while you're still using whatever screen reader it is that you have going, and then walk away and check back some hours later.  I most often kick off in-place upgrades before going to bed, answering the initial few questions until you reach the, "this will take hours of working on the part of the computer," stage.

The next morning you virtually always have one of two outcomes:  You've got a successful Windows 10 upgrade or the machine has rolled back to whatever version of Windows you were trying to upgrade from.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041
The purpose of education is not to validate ignorance but to overcome it. 
       ~ Lawrence Krauss


 

Richard,

            If she's going to get a sighted friend to help, then if at all possible she should pick someone who's not afraid to follow step-by-step instructions:

Doing a Windows 10 Repair Install or Feature Update Using the Windows 10 ISO file

I really wrote these such that a rank beginner who's merely comfortable with following the instructions, as written, can get through the process successfully.  No insult to anyone intended, and with full understanding why some might choose not to do it themselves, but if you're going to engage a sighted assistant unless they're a technophobe they should easily be able to follow these instructions from beginning to end.

As I have already noted, and the instructions themselves note, the steps for an in-place upgrade are identical except that the opening steps are occurring under an earlier version of Windows than Windows 10.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041
The purpose of education is not to validate ignorance but to overcome it. 
       ~ Lawrence Krauss


Billy Inglis
 

That will not happen anytime soon, as the lady in question is at the moment under lock down regulations.

On 12/11/2020 19:38, Richard Kuzma via groups.io wrote:
Good afternoon,
She might want to get a sighted friend to help and then someone could direct her over the phone
*From:*win10@win10.groups.io [mailto:win10@win10.groups.io] *On Behalf Of *Brian Vogel
*Sent:* Thursday, November 12, 2020 12:21 PM
*To:* win10@win10.groups.io
*Subject:* Re: [win10] In-Place Upgrade from Windows 7, 8, or 8.1 - Still Possible in November 2020
On Thu, Nov 12, 2020 at 07:28 AM, Billy Inglis wrote:
i am not sure she could do this, but thanks anyway.
-
You're welcome.  When it comes to what any given individual is willing and/or able to do, they have to make that assessment themselves.
You can definitely get through the initial parts of the setup while you're still using whatever screen reader it is that you have going, and then walk away and check back some hours later.  I most often kick off in-place upgrades before going to bed, answering the initial few questions until you reach the, "this will take hours of working on the part of the computer," stage.
The next morning you virtually always have one of two outcomes:  You've got a successful Windows 10 upgrade or the machine has rolled back to whatever version of Windows you were trying to upgrade from.
--
Brian *-*Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041
/The purpose of education is not to validate ignorance but to overcome it./
       ~ Lawrence Krauss
--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


 

I absolutely do not agree with Brian's statement that "someone who's blind can absolutely do this independently", in fact, there are many sighted people who can't do this independently because they are older and/or just not interested in technology to the point where they ever learned or care to learn to do this. This would be like saying someone who is blind can absolutely ski down a Black Diamond ski run or build fine furniture. Just because some blind people can do this does not mean anyone can and if Billy's friend is one of these people who just want a working computer to do emails, a bit of web browsing or whatever then that is what computer stores and technicians are for if she doesn't have anybody in her close circle who would do it for her.

-----Original Message-----
From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Billy Inglis
Sent: Thursday, November 12, 2020 4:26 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] upgrade?

hi again Brian, as explained the
blind lady in question is not good with computer technology and would find it so difficult. Can you advise please?.
On 11/11/2020 15:35, Brian Vogel wrote:
Billy,

           See my other reply to your question.  Someone who's blind
can absolutely do this independently, but it takes time.  And I've
already echoed Mr. Kuzma in regard to the need to do a full system
image backup of any system before trying an in-place upgrade.

           I've actually never had one fail catastrophically, but I
think I've had two that failed and then rolled everything back.  But I
know of catastrophic failures, so if you want 100% safety in doing an
in-place upgrade you take a full system image backup first.

--

Brian *-*Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041 /The
purpose of education is not to validate ignorance but to overcome it./
       ~ Lawrence Krauss

--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


Monte Single
 

Here! Here!
Simiarly, when I know I need something done, and will need that thing done only once in2 or 3 years, I may just as well choose to get someone to do it who is familiar with the process.
This is especially true if the task involves a series of steps in a set order.
I'm not lazy; I just have priorities.

-----Original Message-----
From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: November 13, 2020 11:04 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] In-Place Upgrade from Windows 7, 8, or 8.1 - Still Possible in November 2020

I absolutely do not agree with Brian's statement that "someone who's blind can absolutely do this independently", in fact, there are many sighted people who can't do this independently because they are older and/or just not interested in technology to the point where they ever learned or care to learn to do this. This would be like saying someone who is blind can absolutely ski down a Black Diamond ski run or build fine furniture. Just because some blind people can do this does not mean anyone can and if Billy's friend is one of these people who just want a working computer to do emails, a bit of web browsing or whatever then that is what computer stores and technicians are for if she doesn't have anybody in her close circle who would do it for her.

-----Original Message-----
From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Billy Inglis
Sent: Thursday, November 12, 2020 4:26 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] upgrade?

hi again Brian, as explained the
blind lady in question is not good with computer technology and would find it so difficult. Can you advise please?.
On 11/11/2020 15:35, Brian Vogel wrote:
Billy,

See my other reply to your question. Someone who's blind
can absolutely do this independently, but it takes time. And I've
already echoed Mr. Kuzma in regard to the need to do a full system
image backup of any system before trying an in-place upgrade.

I've actually never had one fail catastrophically, but I
think I've had two that failed and then rolled everything back. But I
know of catastrophic failures, so if you want 100% safety in doing an
in-place upgrade you take a full system image backup first.

--

Brian *-*Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041 /The
purpose of education is not to validate ignorance but to overcome it./
~ Lawrence Krauss

--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


 

Sieghard,

            Please do not put words into my mouth that I did not say, and specifically qualified.  I have had many blind individuals do this process individually.  They absolutely CAN do it independently.  That is a completely separate issue than whether they want to, and I have clearly said as much.

            I did not say, nor imply, that any individual, blind, sighted, or in-between should or must do anything.  It is intellectually dishonest to act as if I did.  Cherry picking a small segment of what I said, and I did say what you quoted, sans the rest of the qualifying context is just plain dishonest.

            And I've already said that if this individual cannot or will not do it herself, and she has no one in her personal circle that can or will do it, that the next logical step is, and I quote myself:  Hire someone.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041
The purpose of education is not to validate ignorance but to overcome it. 
       ~ Lawrence Krauss