Topics

Battery Saver


Steven Hicks
 

Hi friends,

 

Not sure how but just messing around and I found an option called battery saver.

It seems to have been turned off by default.

Does anyone know where it is located and set, if there are any more info about it?

It may make a big difference if I set it on all the time?

I guess it slows the processor down and all kind of things?

My best laptop only give about 2.5 hours max but turning this on could make a big difference?

 


 

Steven,

           The search function of Windows 10 setting is your (the generic you) friend.  If you open settings and start typing battery, then down arrow, the first thing in the list of suggestions beneath the search box is battery saver settings, which if activated, takes you there.

            Immediately under the entry for Battery Saver Settings are Turn Battery Saver On/Off and Battery Saver Overview.

            Battery saver only kicks in at the "critical percentage" of remaining battery life that you choose, and the default on my machine ins 20%.  So until you reach 20% remaining power it does nothing.  So setting it on "all the time" really isn't "all the time" other than monitoring the remaining battery power.

             If you're trying to keep maximum functional battery life, change your power plan to turn off the screen very quickly when on battery power and you haven't done anything (say, 5 minutes) and to trigger sleep in not much more time (say, 10 minutes).  Firing back up from sleep is virtually instant and the power consumption when sleeping is minuscule, so you can go for many hours of use if you're not using continuously.

             There are scads of write-ups on Windows 10 Battery Saver:  https://duckduckgo.com/?q=Windows+10+Battery+Saver 


--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

Journalism 101:  If someone says it’s raining and another person says it’s dry, it’s not your job to quote them both. It’s your job to look out the f**king window and find out which is true.

      ~ Jonathan Foster (attributed)


Steven Hicks
 

Thanks very much for the explanation Brian.

 

Take care and stay safe.

 

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io [mailto:win10@win10.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: 23 January 2021 01:23
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Battery Saver

 

Steven,

           The search function of Windows 10 setting is your (the generic you) friend.  If you open settings and start typing battery, then down arrow, the first thing in the list of suggestions beneath the search box is battery saver settings, which if activated, takes you there.

            Immediately under the entry for Battery Saver Settings are Turn Battery Saver On/Off and Battery Saver Overview.

            Battery saver only kicks in at the "critical percentage" of remaining battery life that you choose, and the default on my machine ins 20%.  So until you reach 20% remaining power it does nothing.  So setting it on "all the time" really isn't "all the time" other than monitoring the remaining battery power.

             If you're trying to keep maximum functional battery life, change your power plan to turn off the screen very quickly when on battery power and you haven't done anything (say, 5 minutes) and to trigger sleep in not much more time (say, 10 minutes).  Firing back up from sleep is virtually instant and the power consumption when sleeping is minuscule, so you can go for many hours of use if you're not using continuously.

             There are scads of write-ups on Windows 10 Battery Saver:  https://duckduckgo.com/?q=Windows+10+Battery+Saver 


--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

Journalism 101:  If someone says it’s raining and another person says it’s dry, it’s not your job to quote them both. It’s your job to look out the f**king window and find out which is true.

      ~ Jonathan Foster (attributed)


Quentin Christensen
 

Also Windows 10 in some of its power saving modes can be very disruptive to screenreaders.  Just something to be aware of if you explore the battery saver and power options - if you do start running into issues after changing those options, that could be why.

Kind regards

Quentin.

On Sat, Jan 23, 2021 at 11:08 PM Steven Hicks <hickser@...> wrote:

Thanks very much for the explanation Brian.

 

Take care and stay safe.

 

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io [mailto:win10@win10.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: 23 January 2021 01:23
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Battery Saver

 

Steven,

           The search function of Windows 10 setting is your (the generic you) friend.  If you open settings and start typing battery, then down arrow, the first thing in the list of suggestions beneath the search box is battery saver settings, which if activated, takes you there.

            Immediately under the entry for Battery Saver Settings are Turn Battery Saver On/Off and Battery Saver Overview.

            Battery saver only kicks in at the "critical percentage" of remaining battery life that you choose, and the default on my machine ins 20%.  So until you reach 20% remaining power it does nothing.  So setting it on "all the time" really isn't "all the time" other than monitoring the remaining battery power.

             If you're trying to keep maximum functional battery life, change your power plan to turn off the screen very quickly when on battery power and you haven't done anything (say, 5 minutes) and to trigger sleep in not much more time (say, 10 minutes).  Firing back up from sleep is virtually instant and the power consumption when sleeping is minuscule, so you can go for many hours of use if you're not using continuously.

             There are scads of write-ups on Windows 10 Battery Saver:  https://duckduckgo.com/?q=Windows+10+Battery+Saver 


--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

Journalism 101:  If someone says it’s raining and another person says it’s dry, it’s not your job to quote them both. It’s your job to look out the f**king window and find out which is true.

      ~ Jonathan Foster (attributed)



--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager


Sarah k Alawami
 

I have to agree, which is why I don’t often use the power savor options, not even on my laptop. If this comes out odd, I’m a bit tired. Hope this is intelligible.

 

Sarah Alawami, owner of TFfP. We are also on lbry as well.

 

Stay in touch with us via our discord. This is an easier way to both contact us, and get to know your fellow listeners.

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Quentin Christensen
Sent: Tuesday, January 26, 2021 5:39 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io Group Moderators <win10@win10.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [win10] Battery Saver

 

Also Windows 10 in some of its power saving modes can be very disruptive to screenreaders.  Just something to be aware of if you explore the battery saver and power options - if you do start running into issues after changing those options, that could be why.

 

Kind regards

 

Quentin.