Topics

Windows 10 upgrade: 'api-ms-win-core-libraryloader-l1-1-1.dll is missing' error when trying to upgrade from Windows 7 to 10 #msftenable #ADVISORY


 

Hi everyone,

 

For those trying to take advantage of free Windows 10 upgrade for assistive tech users, the following is a recommended community directive:

 

Problem: when trying to upgrade from Windows 7 to 10, the following error appears:

Error: api-ms-win-core-libraryloader-l1-1-1.dll is missing.

 

Steps to reproduce:

  1. From a Windows 7 computer, run Windows 10 Upgrade Assistant.
  2. At some point, an error similar to the one above is displayed.

 

Expected: upgrade proceeds without problems.

Actual: the error pops up with “Retry” button.

Cause: Windows 7 ships with an older version of a required DLL, and Windows 10 Upgrade may not detect it properly. The actual culprit is not the missing library, but a file named wimgapi.dll, the Windows Imaging Format (wim) handler.

 

Possible solution: copy and replace a DLL that ships with Upgrade Assistant with the one found in current Windows installation:

  1. If you haven’t, tell Windows Explorer to show hidden files and show file extensions (Control Panel/Folder Options/View tab).
  2. Navigate to the following folder:

%sysdrive%\Windows\System32

For example, for most users, the path will be C:\Windows\System32.

  1. Locate a DLL named “wimgapi.dll” and copy it to:

%sysdrive%\Windows10Upgrade

For most cases, it’ll be C:\Windows10Upgrade folder. Say “continue” or “yes” when prompted to replace the file.

Solution source: https://community.spiceworks.com/how_to/149217-fix-windows-10-upgrade-error-libraryloader-l1-1-1-is-missing

 

Details:

 

Windows Vista and later uses disk images for Windows installations. Although the setup process has changed over the years, the basic mechanism introduced in 2007 still applies.

 

The setup process goes as follows:

  1. Windows checks various system requirements, such as free disk space, and recently on 64-bit systems, whether certain processor instructions are available (details below).
  2. Once the check is complete, Windows will unpack setup files. Among them are two .wim (windows Image) files named boot.wim and install.wim. This is the most likely step that’s causing the problem described above, as the setup program will look for wimgapi.dll file to handle .wim files. The version that ships with Windows 7 is missing the DLL file noted in the error message (source: https://www.solvusoft.com/en/files/missing-not-found-error/dll/windows/microsoft/windows-8-pro/api-ms-win-core-libraryloader-l1-1-1-dll/)
  3. The boot.wim file is the image for Windows Preinstallation Environment (PE) and will be unpacked to a location that’ll be searched during a reboot, then the computer will restart.
  4. Windows PE that was just unpacked from boot.wim will run, at which point it’ll unpack more files, amongst them install.wim.
  5. Old Windows installation is saved to a folder named windows.old on your internal drive (hard drive or SSD).
  6. The install.wim file contains installation images for all editions of Windows (except Enterprise). Depending on edition chosen (entering a product key, choosing what to install via clean install, or detected during in-place upgrade), the correct installation image will now be unpacked and contents will be copied to your internal drive.
  7. Old data will be migrated to new installation, such as compatible programs, drivers, user data and so on.
  8. Once installation is complete, you’ll be presented with what’s called ‘out of box experience” where you can configure various settings.

 

Notes:

  1. In order to install Windows 10, all x86/x64 processors must be equipped with PAE (Physical Address Extension), SSE2 (Streaming SIMD Extensions 2) and NX (No eXecute).
  2. On 64-bit (x64) systems, the processor must be equipped with CMPXCHG16B (128-bit compare and swap), PREFETCHW (data prefetch, part of 3D Now!) and LAHF/SAHF (load and save flag registers) instructions.
  3. In order to take advantage of Hyper-V and related features (including Windows Defender Application Guard and other virtualization technologies) on 64-bit systems, the processor must come with virtualization features turned on.

 

References:

 

Alternative solution: clean install. Provided that you manage to obtain the ISO file for latest Windows 10 release and create an installation image on a DVD or a USB flash drive (at least 8 GB in size), you can back up your data, boot from the installation media, and use Narrator to perform a clean install. While backing up data, use Magical Jellybean, Belarc Advisor and similar programs to retrieve the 25-character Windows product key, as you’ll need it during the installation process (you can type in a Windows 7, 8 or 8.1 product key and Windows 10 will be activated provided that it isn’t an illegal key). In order to use Narrator during a clean install, the sound card must be detected by the installer, and to start Narrator, press Control+Windows+Enter key (wait about a minute or two after booting to the installation media before invoking this command).

 

Note: the above solution(s) should be verified by people (especially Microsoft staff) before going out as official solution, thus the recommendation tag.

 

Cheers,

Joseph


 

Hi,

Important: once you copy the offending DLL, tell Windows to never show protected operating system files.

Apart from that, I’d like to ask folks on this forum cluster to keep an eye on this and similar ones for the next few days as the upgrade period draws to a close.

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io [mailto:win10@win10.groups.io] On Behalf Of Joseph Lee
Sent: Sunday, December 24, 2017 9:19 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: [win10] Windows 10 upgrade: 'api-ms-win-core-libraryloader-l1-1-1.dll is missing' error when trying to upgrade from Windows 7 to 10 #MSFTEnable #ADVISORY

 

Hi everyone,

 

For those trying to take advantage of free Windows 10 upgrade for assistive tech users, the following is a recommended community directive:

 

Problem: when trying to upgrade from Windows 7 to 10, the following error appears:

Error: api-ms-win-core-libraryloader-l1-1-1.dll is missing.

 

Steps to reproduce:

  1. From a Windows 7 computer, run Windows 10 Upgrade Assistant.
  2. At some point, an error similar to the one above is displayed.

 

Expected: upgrade proceeds without problems.

Actual: the error pops up with “Retry” button.

Cause: Windows 7 ships with an older version of a required DLL, and Windows 10 Upgrade may not detect it properly. The actual culprit is not the missing library, but a file named wimgapi.dll, the Windows Imaging Format (wim) handler.

 

Possible solution: copy and replace a DLL that ships with Upgrade Assistant with the one found in current Windows installation:

  1. If you haven’t, tell Windows Explorer to show hidden files and show file extensions (Control Panel/Folder Options/View tab).
  2. Navigate to the following folder:

%sysdrive%\Windows\System32

For example, for most users, the path will be C:\Windows\System32.

  1. Locate a DLL named “wimgapi.dll” and copy it to:

%sysdrive%\Windows10Upgrade

For most cases, it’ll be C:\Windows10Upgrade folder. Say “continue” or “yes” when prompted to replace the file.

Solution source: https://community.spiceworks.com/how_to/149217-fix-windows-10-upgrade-error-libraryloader-l1-1-1-is-missing

 

Details:

 

Windows Vista and later uses disk images for Windows installations. Although the setup process has changed over the years, the basic mechanism introduced in 2007 still applies.

 

The setup process goes as follows:

  1. Windows checks various system requirements, such as free disk space, and recently on 64-bit systems, whether certain processor instructions are available (details below).
  2. Once the check is complete, Windows will unpack setup files. Among them are two .wim (windows Image) files named boot.wim and install.wim. This is the most likely step that’s causing the problem described above, as the setup program will look for wimgapi.dll file to handle .wim files. The version that ships with Windows 7 is missing the DLL file noted in the error message (source: https://www.solvusoft.com/en/files/missing-not-found-error/dll/windows/microsoft/windows-8-pro/api-ms-win-core-libraryloader-l1-1-1-dll/)
  3. The boot.wim file is the image for Windows Preinstallation Environment (PE) and will be unpacked to a location that’ll be searched during a reboot, then the computer will restart.
  4. Windows PE that was just unpacked from boot.wim will run, at which point it’ll unpack more files, amongst them install.wim.
  5. Old Windows installation is saved to a folder named windows.old on your internal drive (hard drive or SSD).
  6. The install.wim file contains installation images for all editions of Windows (except Enterprise). Depending on edition chosen (entering a product key, choosing what to install via clean install, or detected during in-place upgrade), the correct installation image will now be unpacked and contents will be copied to your internal drive.
  7. Old data will be migrated to new installation, such as compatible programs, drivers, user data and so on.
  8. Once installation is complete, you’ll be presented with what’s called ‘out of box experience” where you can configure various settings.

 

Notes:

  1. In order to install Windows 10, all x86/x64 processors must be equipped with PAE (Physical Address Extension), SSE2 (Streaming SIMD Extensions 2) and NX (No eXecute).
  2. On 64-bit (x64) systems, the processor must be equipped with CMPXCHG16B (128-bit compare and swap), PREFETCHW (data prefetch, part of 3D Now!) and LAHF/SAHF (load and save flag registers) instructions.
  3. In order to take advantage of Hyper-V and related features (including Windows Defender Application Guard and other virtualization technologies) on 64-bit systems, the processor must come with virtualization features turned on.

 

References:

 

Alternative solution: clean install. Provided that you manage to obtain the ISO file for latest Windows 10 release and create an installation image on a DVD or a USB flash drive (at least 8 GB in size), you can back up your data, boot from the installation media, and use Narrator to perform a clean install. While backing up data, use Magical Jellybean, Belarc Advisor and similar programs to retrieve the 25-character Windows product key, as you’ll need it during the installation process (you can type in a Windows 7, 8 or 8.1 product key and Windows 10 will be activated provided that it isn’t an illegal key). In order to use Narrator during a clean install, the sound card must be detected by the installer, and to start Narrator, press Control+Windows+Enter key (wait about a minute or two after booting to the installation media before invoking this command).

 

Note: the above solution(s) should be verified by people (especially Microsoft staff) before going out as official solution, thus the recommendation tag.

 

Cheers,

Joseph


Dave... <dgcarlson@...>
 

Joseph,
 
 
Giving this a try, even as I write. However, let me point out that on my C:\ drive, I only had a "Windows 10 Upgrade Aborted" folder. So I had to start the upgrade again so that it created the "Windows 10 Upgrade" folder once again. Then while it was downloading, I found and overwrote the "wimgapi.dll" file as instructed. Let's see if it works this time.
 
Dave
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer
 
 

----- Original Message -----
From: Joseph Lee
Sent: Sunday, December 24, 2017 09:19
Subject: [win10] Windows 10 upgrade: 'api-ms-win-core-libraryloader-l1-1-1.dll is missing' error when trying to upgrade from Windows 7 to 10 #MSFTEnable #ADVISORY

Hi everyone,

 

For those trying to take advantage of free Windows 10 upgrade for assistive tech users, the following is a recommended community directive:

 

Problem: when trying to upgrade from Windows 7 to 10, the following error appears:

Error: api-ms-win-core-libraryloader-l1-1-1.dll is missing.

 

Steps to reproduce:

  1. From a Windows 7 computer, run Windows 10 Upgrade Assistant.
  2. At some point, an error similar to the one above is displayed.

 

Expected: upgrade proceeds without problems.

Actual: the error pops up with “Retry” button.

Cause: Windows 7 ships with an older version of a required DLL, and Windows 10 Upgrade may not detect it properly. The actual culprit is not the missing library, but a file named wimgapi.dll, the Windows Imaging Format (wim) handler.

 

Possible solution: copy and replace a DLL that ships with Upgrade Assistant with the one found in current Windows installation:

  1. If you haven’t, tell Windows Explorer to show hidden files and show file extensions (Control Panel/Folder Options/View tab).
  2. Navigate to the following folder:

%sysdrive%\Windows\System32

For example, for most users, the path will be C:\Windows\System32.

  1. Locate a DLL named “wimgapi.dll” and copy it to:

%sysdrive%\Windows10Upgrade

For most cases, it’ll be C:\Windows10Upgrade folder. Say “continue” or “yes” when prompted to replace the file.

Solution source: https://community.spiceworks.com/how_to/149217-fix-windows-10-upgrade-error-libraryloader-l1-1-1-is-missing

 

Details:

 

Windows Vista and later uses disk images for Windows installations. Although the setup process has changed over the years, the basic mechanism introduced in 2007 still applies.

 

The setup process goes as follows:

  1. Windows checks various system requirements, such as free disk space, and recently on 64-bit systems, whether certain processor instructions are available (details below).
  2. Once the check is complete, Windows will unpack setup files. Among them are two .wim (windows Image) files named boot.wim and install.wim. This is the most likely step that’s causing the problem described above, as the setup program will look for wimgapi.dll file to handle .wim files. The version that ships with Windows 7 is missing the DLL file noted in the error message (source: https://wwwsolvusoft.com/en/files/missing-not-found-error/dll/windows/microsoft/windows-8-pro/api-ms-win-core-libraryloader-l1-1-1-dll/)
  3. The boot.wim file is the image for Windows Preinstallation Environment (PE) and will be unpacked to a location that’ll be searched during a reboot, then the computer will restart.
  4. Windows PE that was just unpacked from boot.wim will run, at which point it’ll unpack more files, amongst them install.wim.
  5. Old Windows installation is saved to a folder named windows.old on your internal drive (hard drive or SSD).
  6. The install.wim file contains installation images for all editions of Windows (except Enterprise). Depending on edition chosen (entering a product key, choosing what to install via clean install, or detected during in-place upgrade), the correct installation image will now be unpacked and contents will be copied to your internal drive.
  7. Old data will be migrated to new installation, such as compatible programs, drivers, user data and so on.
  8. Once installation is complete, you’ll be presented with what’s called ‘out of box experience” where you can configure various settings.

 

Notes:

  1. In order to install Windows 10, all x86/x64 processors must be equipped with PAE (Physical Address Extension), SSE2 (Streaming SIMD Extensions 2) and NX (No eXecute).
  2. On 64-bit (x64) systems, the processor must be equipped with CMPXCHG16B (128-bit compare and swap), PREFETCHW (data prefetch, part of 3D Now!) and LAHF/SAHF (load and save flag registers) instructions.
  3. In order to take advantage of Hyper-V and related features (including Windows Defender Application Guard and other virtualization technologies) on 64-bit systems, the processor must come with virtualization features turned on.

 

References:

 

Alternative solution: clean install. Provided that you manage to obtain the ISO file for latest Windows 10 release and create an installation image on a DVD or a USB flash drive (at least 8 GB in size), you can back up your data, boot from the installation media, and use Narrator to perform a clean install. While backing up data, use Magical Jellybean, Belarc Advisor and similar programs to retrieve the 25-character Windows product key, as you’ll need it during the installation process (you can type in a Windows 7, 8 or 8.1 product key and Windows 10 will be activated provided that it isn’t an illegal key). In order to use Narrator during a clean install, the sound card must be detected by the installer, and to start Narrator, press Control+Windows+Enter key (wait about a minute or two after booting to the installation media before invoking this command).

 

Note: the above solution(s) should be verified by people (especially Microsoft staff) before going out as official solution, thus the recommendation tag.

 

Cheers,

Joseph


Dave... <dgcarlson@...>
 

Nope. Still failing. I'll wait until MS Accessibility Tier 2 calls me in January.
3
Dave
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer
 
 

----- Original Message -----
From: Dave...
Sent: Sunday, December 24, 2017 10:48
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows 10 upgrade: 'api-ms-win-core-libraryloader-l1-1-1.dll is missing' error when trying to upgrade from Windows 7 to 10 #MSFTEnable #ADVISORY

Joseph,
 
 
Giving this a try, even as I write. However, let me point out that on my C:\ drive, I only had a "Windows 10 Upgrade Aborted" folder So I had to start the upgrade again so that it created the "Windows 10 Upgrade" folder once again. Then while it was downloading, I found and overwrote the "wimgapi.dll" file as instructed. Let's see if it works this time.
 
Dave
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer
 
 
----- Original Message -----
From: Joseph Lee
Sent: Sunday, December 24, 2017 09:19
Subject: [win10] Windows 10 upgrade: 'api-ms-win-core-libraryloader-l1-1-1.dll is missing' error when trying to upgrade from Windows 7 to 10 #MSFTEnable #ADVISORY

Hi everyone,

 

For those trying to take advantage of free Windows 10 upgrade for assistive tech users, the following is a recommended community directive:

 

Problem: when trying to upgrade from Windows 7 to 10, the following error appears:

Error: api-ms-win-core-libraryloader-l1-1-1.dll is missing.

 

Steps to reproduce:

  1. From a Windows 7 computer, run Windows 10 Upgrade Assistant.
  2. At some point, an error similar to the one above is displayed.

 

Expected: upgrade proceeds without problems.

Actual: the error pops up with “Retry” button.

Cause: Windows 7 ships with an older version of a required DLL, and Windows 10 Upgrade may not detect it properly. The actual culprit is not the missing library, but a file named wimgapi.dll, the Windows Imaging Format (wim) handler.

 

Possible solution: copy and replace a DLL that ships with Upgrade Assistant with the one found in current Windows installation:

  1. If you haven’t, tell Windows Explorer to show hidden files and show file extensions (Control Panel/Folder Options/View tab).
  2. Navigate to the following folder:

%sysdrive%\Windows\System32

For example, for most users, the path will be C:\Windows\System32.

  1. Locate a DLL named “wimgapi.dll” and copy it to:

%sysdrive%\Windows10Upgrade

For most cases, it’ll be C:\Windows10Upgrade folder Say “continue” or “yes” when prompted to replace the file.

Solution source: https://community.spiceworks.com/how_to/149217-fix-windows-10-upgrade-error-libraryloader-l1-1-1-is-missing

 

Details:

 

Windows Vista and later uses disk images for Windows installations. Although the setup process has changed over the years, the basic mechanism introduced in 2007 still applies.

 

The setup process goes as follows:

  1. Windows checks various system requirements, such as free disk space, and recently on 64-bit systems, whether certain processor instructions are available (details below).
  2. Once the check is complete, Windows will unpack setup files. Among them are two .wim (windows Image) files named boot.wim and install.wim. This is the most likely step that’s causing the problem described above, as the setup program will look for wimgapi.dll file to handle .wim files. The version that ships with Windows 7 is missing the DLL file noted in the error message (source: https://wwwsolvusoft.com/en/files/missing-not-found-error/dll/windows/microsoft/windows-8-pro/api-ms-win-core-libraryloader-l1-1-1-dll/)
  3. The boot.wim file is the image for Windows Preinstallation Environment (PE) and will be unpacked to a location that’ll be searched during a reboot, then the computer will restart.
  4. Windows PE that was just unpacked from boot.wim will run, at which point it’ll unpack more files, amongst them install.wim.
  5. Old Windows installation is saved to a folder named windows.old on your internal drive (hard drive or SSD).
  6. The install.wim file contains installation images for all editions of Windows (except Enterprise). Depending on edition chosen (entering a product key, choosing what to install via clean install, or detected during in-place upgrade), the correct installation image will now be unpacked and contents will be copied to your internal drive.
  7. Old data will be migrated to new installation, such as compatible programs, drivers, user data and so on.
  8. Once installation is complete, you’ll be presented with what’s called ‘out of box experience” where you can configure various settings.

 

Notes:

  1. In order to install Windows 10, all x86/x64 processors must be equipped with PAE (Physical Address Extension), SSE2 (Streaming SIMD Extensions 2) and NX (No eXecute).
  2. On 64-bit (x64) systems, the processor must be equipped with CMPXCHG16B (128-bit compare and swap), PREFETCHW (data prefetch, part of 3D Now!) and LAHF/SAHF (load and save flag registers) instructions.
  3. In order to take advantage of Hyper-V and related features (including Windows Defender Application Guard and other virtualization technologies) on 64-bit systems, the processor must come with virtualization features turned on.

 

References:

 

Alternative solution: clean install. Provided that you manage to obtain the ISO file for latest Windows 10 release and create an installation image on a DVD or a USB flash drive (at least 8 GB in size), you can back up your data, boot from the installation media, and use Narrator to perform a clean install. While backing up data, use Magical Jellybean, Belarc Advisor and similar programs to retrieve the 25-character Windows product key, as you’ll need it during the installation process (you can type in a Windows 7, 8 or 8.1 product key and Windows 10 will be activated provided that it isn’t an illegal key). In order to use Narrator during a clean install, the sound card must be detected by the installer, and to start Narrator, press Control+Windows+Enter key (wait about a minute or two after booting to the installation media before invoking this command).

 

Note: the above solution(s) should be verified by people (especially Microsoft staff) before going out as official solution, thus the recommendation tag.

 

Cheers,

Joseph


Dennis L
 

Did you schedule it for January 3rd?  or is that what they said?  They told me two days.

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io [mailto:win10@win10.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave...
Sent: Sunday, December 24, 2017 2:46 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows 10 upgrade: 'api-ms-win-core-libraryloader-l1-1-1.dll is missing' error when trying to upgrade from Windows 7 to 10 #MSFTEnable #ADVISORY

 

Nope. Still failing. I'll wait until MS Accessibility Tier 2 calls me in January.

3

Dave
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer

 

 

----- Original Message -----

From: Dave...

Sent: Sunday, December 24, 2017 10:48

Subject: Re: [win10] Windows 10 upgrade: 'api-ms-win-core-libraryloader-l1-1-1.dll is missing' error when trying to upgrade from Windows 7 to 10 #MSFTEnable #ADVISORY

 

Joseph,

 

 

Giving this a try, even as I write. However, let me point out that on my C:\ drive, I only had a "Windows 10 Upgrade Aborted" folder So I had to start the upgrade again so that it created the "Windows 10 Upgrade" folder once again. Then while it was downloading, I found and overwrote the "wimgapi.dll" file as instructed. Let's see if it works this time.

 

Dave
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer

 

 

----- Original Message -----

From: Joseph Lee

Sent: Sunday, December 24, 2017 09:19

Subject: [win10] Windows 10 upgrade: 'api-ms-win-core-libraryloader-l1-1-1.dll is missing' error when trying to upgrade from Windows 7 to 10 #MSFTEnable #ADVISORY

 

Hi everyone,

 

For those trying to take advantage of free Windows 10 upgrade for assistive tech users, the following is a recommended community directive:

 

Problem: when trying to upgrade from Windows 7 to 10, the following error appears:

Error: api-ms-win-core-libraryloader-l1-1-1.dll is missing.

 

Steps to reproduce:

  1. From a Windows 7 computer, run Windows 10 Upgrade Assistant.
  2. At some point, an error similar to the one above is displayed.

 

Expected: upgrade proceeds without problems.

Actual: the error pops up with “Retry” button.

Cause: Windows 7 ships with an older version of a required DLL, and Windows 10 Upgrade may not detect it properly. The actual culprit is not the missing library, but a file named wimgapi.dll, the Windows Imaging Format (wim) handler.

 

Possible solution: copy and replace a DLL that ships with Upgrade Assistant with the one found in current Windows installation:

  1. If you haven’t, tell Windows Explorer to show hidden files and show file extensions (Control Panel/Folder Options/View tab).
  2. Navigate to the following folder:

%sysdrive%\Windows\System32

For example, for most users, the path will be C:\Windows\System32.

  1. Locate a DLL named “wimgapi.dll” and copy it to:

%sysdrive%\Windows10Upgrade

For most cases, it’ll be C:\Windows10Upgrade folder Say “continue” or “yes” when prompted to replace the file.

Solution source: https://community.spiceworks.com/how_to/149217-fix-windows-10-upgrade-error-libraryloader-l1-1-1-is-missing

 

Details:

 

Windows Vista and later uses disk images for Windows installations. Although the setup process has changed over the years, the basic mechanism introduced in 2007 still applies.

 

The setup process goes as follows:

  1. Windows checks various system requirements, such as free disk space, and recently on 64-bit systems, whether certain processor instructions are available (details below).
  2. Once the check is complete, Windows will unpack setup files. Among them are two .wim (windows Image) files named boot.wim and install.wim. This is the most likely step that’s causing the problem described above, as the setup program will look for wimgapi.dll file to handle .wim files. The version that ships with Windows 7 is missing the DLL file noted in the error message (source: https://wwwsolvusoft.com/en/files/missing-not-found-error/dll/windows/microsoft/windows-8-pro/api-ms-win-core-libraryloader-l1-1-1-dll/)
  3. The boot.wim file is the image for Windows Preinstallation Environment (PE) and will be unpacked to a location that’ll be searched during a reboot, then the computer will restart.
  4. Windows PE that was just unpacked from boot.wim will run, at which point it’ll unpack more files, amongst them install.wim.
  5. Old Windows installation is saved to a folder named windows.old on your internal drive (hard drive or SSD).
  6. The install.wim file contains installation images for all editions of Windows (except Enterprise). Depending on edition chosen (entering a product key, choosing what to install via clean install, or detected during in-place upgrade), the correct installation image will now be unpacked and contents will be copied to your internal drive.
  7. Old data will be migrated to new installation, such as compatible programs, drivers, user data and so on.
  8. Once installation is complete, you’ll be presented with what’s called ‘out of box experience” where you can configure various settings.

 

Notes:

  1. In order to install Windows 10, all x86/x64 processors must be equipped with PAE (Physical Address Extension), SSE2 (Streaming SIMD Extensions 2) and NX (No eXecute).
  2. On 64-bit (x64) systems, the processor must be equipped with CMPXCHG16B (128-bit compare and swap), PREFETCHW (data prefetch, part of 3D Now!) and LAHF/SAHF (load and save flag registers) instructions.
  3. In order to take advantage of Hyper-V and related features (including Windows Defender Application Guard and other virtualization technologies) on 64-bit systems, the processor must come with virtualization features turned on.

 

References:

 

Alternative solution: clean install. Provided that you manage to obtain the ISO file for latest Windows 10 release and create an installation image on a DVD or a USB flash drive (at least 8 GB in size), you can back up your data, boot from the installation media, and use Narrator to perform a clean install. While backing up data, use Magical Jellybean, Belarc Advisor and similar programs to retrieve the 25-character Windows product key, as you’ll need it during the installation process (you can type in a Windows 7, 8 or 8.1 product key and Windows 10 will be activated provided that it isn’t an illegal key). In order to use Narrator during a clean install, the sound card must be detected by the installer, and to start Narrator, press Control+Windows+Enter key (wait about a minute or two after booting to the installation media before invoking this command).

 

Note: the above solution(s) should be verified by people (especially Microsoft staff) before going out as official solution, thus the recommendation tag.

 

Cheers,

Joseph


Dave... <dgcarlson@...>
 

Yes, I told them that during the holidays, I could not spend time with them troubleshooting the problem, and said that after 4 January would work for me.
 
Dave
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer
 
 

----- Original Message -----
From: Dennis L
Sent: Sunday, December 24, 2017 11:48
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows 10 upgrade: 'api-ms-win-core-libraryloader-l1-1-1.dll is missing' error when trying to upgrade from Windows 7 to 10 #MSFTEnable #ADVISORY

Did you schedule it for January 3rd?  or is that what they said?  They told me two days.

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io [mailto:win10@win10.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave...
Sent: Sunday, December 24, 2017 2:46 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows 10 upgrade: 'api-ms-win-core-libraryloader-l1-1-1.dll is missing' error when trying to upgrade from Windows 7 to 10 #MSFTEnable #ADVISORY

 

Nope. Still failing. I'll wait until MS Accessibility Tier 2 calls me in January.

3

Dave
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer

 

 

----- Original Message -----

From: Dave...

Sent: Sunday, December 24, 2017 10:48

Subject: Re: [win10] Windows 10 upgrade: 'api-ms-win-core-libraryloader-l1-1-1.dll is missing' error when trying to upgrade from Windows 7 to 10 #MSFTEnable #ADVISORY

 

Joseph,

 

 

Giving this a try, even as I write. However, let me point out that on my C:\ drive, I only had a "Windows 10 Upgrade Aborted" folder So I had to start the upgrade again so that it created the "Windows 10 Upgrade" folder once again. Then while it was downloading, I found and overwrote the "wimgapi.dll" file as instructed. Let's see if it works this time.

 

Dave
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer

 

 

----- Original Message -----

From: Joseph Lee

Sent: Sunday, December 24, 2017 09:19

Subject: [win10] Windows 10 upgrade: 'api-ms-win-core-libraryloader-l1-1-1.dll is missing' error when trying to upgrade from Windows 7 to 10 #MSFTEnable #ADVISORY

 

Hi everyone,

 

For those trying to take advantage of free Windows 10 upgrade for assistive tech users, the following is a recommended community directive:

 

Problem: when trying to upgrade from Windows 7 to 10, the following error appears:

Error: api-ms-win-core-libraryloader-l1-1-1.dll is missing.

 

Steps to reproduce:

  1. From a Windows 7 computer, run Windows 10 Upgrade Assistant.
  2. At some point, an error similar to the one above is displayed.

 

Expected: upgrade proceeds without problems.

Actual: the error pops up with “Retry” button.

Cause: Windows 7 ships with an older version of a required DLL, and Windows 10 Upgrade may not detect it properly. The actual culprit is not the missing library, but a file named wimgapi.dll, the Windows Imaging Format (wim) handler.

 

Possible solution: copy and replace a DLL that ships with Upgrade Assistant with the one found in current Windows installation:

  1. If you haven’t, tell Windows Explorer to show hidden files and show file extensions (Control Panel/Folder Options/View tab).
  2. Navigate to the following folder:

%sysdrive%\Windows\System32

For example, for most users, the path will be C:\Windows\System32.

  1. Locate a DLL named “wimgapi.dll” and copy it to:

%sysdrive%\Windows10Upgrade

For most cases, it’ll be C:\Windows10Upgrade folder Say “continue” or “yes” when prompted to replace the file.

Solution source: https://community.spiceworks.com/how_to/149217-fix-windows-10-upgrade-error-libraryloader-l1-1-1-is-missing

 

Details:

 

Windows Vista and later uses disk images for Windows installations. Although the setup process has changed over the years, the basic mechanism introduced in 2007 still applies.

 

The setup process goes as follows:

  1. Windows checks various system requirements, such as free disk space, and recently on 64-bit systems, whether certain processor instructions are available (details below).
  2. Once the check is complete, Windows will unpack setup files. Among them are two .wim (windows Image) files named boot.wim and install.wim. This is the most likely step that’s causing the problem described above, as the setup program will look for wimgapi.dll file to handle .wim files. The version that ships with Windows 7 is missing the DLL file noted in the error message (source: https://wwwsolvusoft.com/en/files/missing-not-found-error/dll/windows/microsoft/windows-8-pro/api-ms-win-core-libraryloader-l1-1-1-dll/)
  3. The boot.wim file is the image for Windows Preinstallation Environment (PE) and will be unpacked to a location that’ll be searched during a reboot, then the computer will restart.
  4. Windows PE that was just unpacked from boot.wim will run, at which point it’ll unpack more files, amongst them install.wim.
  5. Old Windows installation is saved to a folder named windows.old on your internal drive (hard drive or SSD).
  6. The install.wim file contains installation images for all editions of Windows (except Enterprise). Depending on edition chosen (entering a product key, choosing what to install via clean install, or detected during in-place upgrade), the correct installation image will now be unpacked and contents will be copied to your internal drive.
  7. Old data will be migrated to new installation, such as compatible programs, drivers, user data and so on.
  8. Once installation is complete, you’ll be presented with what’s called ‘out of box experience” where you can configure various settings.

 

Notes:

  1. In order to install Windows 10, all x86/x64 processors must be equipped with PAE (Physical Address Extension), SSE2 (Streaming SIMD Extensions 2) and NX (No eXecute).
  2. On 64-bit (x64) systems, the processor must be equipped with CMPXCHG16B (128-bit compare and swap), PREFETCHW (data prefetch, part of 3D Now!) and LAHF/SAHF (load and save flag registers) instructions.
  3. In order to take advantage of Hyper-V and related features (including Windows Defender Application Guard and other virtualization technologies) on 64-bit systems, the processor must come with virtualization features turned on.

 

References:

 

Alternative solution: clean install. Provided that you manage to obtain the ISO file for latest Windows 10 release and create an installation image on a DVD or a USB flash drive (at least 8 GB in size), you can back up your data, boot from the installation media, and use Narrator to perform a clean install. While backing up data, use Magical Jellybean, Belarc Advisor and similar programs to retrieve the 25-character Windows product key, as you’ll need it during the installation process (you can type in a Windows 7, 8 or 8.1 product key and Windows 10 will be activated provided that it isn’t an illegal key). In order to use Narrator during a clean install, the sound card must be detected by the installer, and to start Narrator, press Control+Windows+Enter key (wait about a minute or two after booting to the installation media before invoking this command).

 

Note: the above solution(s) should be verified by people (especially Microsoft staff) before going out as official solution, thus the recommendation tag.

 

Cheers,

Joseph


Hicks Steven (CORNWALL IT SERVICES) <steven.hicks@...>
 

As far as I am aware, the free upgrade ends on the 31st December anyway so this will no longer be a problem after that.

 

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io [mailto:win10@win10.groups.io] On Behalf Of Joseph Lee
Sent: 24 December 2017 17:19
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: [win10] Windows 10 upgrade: 'api-ms-win-core-libraryloader-l1-1-1.dll is missing' error when trying to upgrade from Windows 7 to 10 #MSFTEnable #ADVISORY

 

Hi everyone,

 

For those trying to take advantage of free Windows 10 upgrade for assistive tech users, the following is a recommended community directive:

 

Problem: when trying to upgrade from Windows 7 to 10, the following error appears:

Error: api-ms-win-core-libraryloader-l1-1-1.dll is missing.

 

Steps to reproduce:

  1. From a Windows 7 computer, run Windows 10 Upgrade Assistant.
  2. At some point, an error similar to the one above is displayed.

 

Expected: upgrade proceeds without problems.

Actual: the error pops up with “Retry” button.

Cause: Windows 7 ships with an older version of a required DLL, and Windows 10 Upgrade may not detect it properly. The actual culprit is not the missing library, but a file named wimgapi.dll, the Windows Imaging Format (wim) handler.

 

Possible solution: copy and replace a DLL that ships with Upgrade Assistant with the one found in current Windows installation:

  1. If you haven’t, tell Windows Explorer to show hidden files and show file extensions (Control Panel/Folder Options/View tab).
  2. Navigate to the following folder:

%sysdrive%\Windows\System32

For example, for most users, the path will be C:\Windows\System32.

  1. Locate a DLL named “wimgapi.dll” and copy it to:

%sysdrive%\Windows10Upgrade

For most cases, it’ll be C:\Windows10Upgrade folder. Say “continue” or “yes” when prompted to replace the file.

Solution source: https://community.spiceworks.com/how_to/149217-fix-windows-10-upgrade-error-libraryloader-l1-1-1-is-missing

 

Details:

 

Windows Vista and later uses disk images for Windows installations. Although the setup process has changed over the years, the basic mechanism introduced in 2007 still applies.

 

The setup process goes as follows:

  1. Windows checks various system requirements, such as free disk space, and recently on 64-bit systems, whether certain processor instructions are available (details below).
  2. Once the check is complete, Windows will unpack setup files. Among them are two .wim (windows Image) files named boot.wim and install.wim. This is the most likely step that’s causing the problem described above, as the setup program will look for wimgapi.dll file to handle .wim files. The version that ships with Windows 7 is missing the DLL file noted in the error message (source: https://www.solvusoft.com/en/files/missing-not-found-error/dll/windows/microsoft/windows-8-pro/api-ms-win-core-libraryloader-l1-1-1-dll/)
  3. The boot.wim file is the image for Windows Preinstallation Environment (PE) and will be unpacked to a location that’ll be searched during a reboot, then the computer will restart.
  4. Windows PE that was just unpacked from boot.wim will run, at which point it’ll unpack more files, amongst them install.wim.
  5. Old Windows installation is saved to a folder named windows.old on your internal drive (hard drive or SSD).
  6. The install.wim file contains installation images for all editions of Windows (except Enterprise). Depending on edition chosen (entering a product key, choosing what to install via clean install, or detected during in-place upgrade), the correct installation image will now be unpacked and contents will be copied to your internal drive.
  7. Old data will be migrated to new installation, such as compatible programs, drivers, user data and so on.
  8. Once installation is complete, you’ll be presented with what’s called ‘out of box experience” where you can configure various settings.

 

Notes:

  1. In order to install Windows 10, all x86/x64 processors must be equipped with PAE (Physical Address Extension), SSE2 (Streaming SIMD Extensions 2) and NX (No eXecute).
  2. On 64-bit (x64) systems, the processor must be equipped with CMPXCHG16B (128-bit compare and swap), PREFETCHW (data prefetch, part of 3D Now!) and LAHF/SAHF (load and save flag registers) instructions.
  3. In order to take advantage of Hyper-V and related features (including Windows Defender Application Guard and other virtualization technologies) on 64-bit systems, the processor must come with virtualization features turned on.

 

References:

 

Alternative solution: clean install. Provided that you manage to obtain the ISO file for latest Windows 10 release and create an installation image on a DVD or a USB flash drive (at least 8 GB in size), you can back up your data, boot from the installation media, and use Narrator to perform a clean install. While backing up data, use Magical Jellybean, Belarc Advisor and similar programs to retrieve the 25-character Windows product key, as you’ll need it during the installation process (you can type in a Windows 7, 8 or 8.1 product key and Windows 10 will be activated provided that it isn’t an illegal key). In order to use Narrator during a clean install, the sound card must be detected by the installer, and to start Narrator, press Control+Windows+Enter key (wait about a minute or two after booting to the installation media before invoking this command).

 

Note: the above solution(s) should be verified by people (especially Microsoft staff) before going out as official solution, thus the recommendation tag.

 

Cheers,

Joseph



********************************************************************************************************************

This message may contain confidential information. If you are not the intended recipient please inform the
sender that you have received the message in error before deleting it.
Please do not disclose, copy or distribute information in this e-mail or take any action in relation to its contents. To do so is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful. Thank you for your co-operation.

NHSmail is the secure email and directory service available for all NHS staff in England and Scotland. NHSmail is approved for exchanging patient data and other sensitive information with NHSmail and other accredited email services.

For more information and to find out how you can switch, https://portal.nhs.net/help/joiningnhsmail


tim
 

When I got that error I had to do a lot more than just copy wimgapi.dll to the windows 10 upgrade folder.
I also had to go into the windows folder softwaredistribution
 and delete everything in the download folder. Then change the name of $windows bt folder to $ windows btzap and then copy that file over. Now I ran the installer with no problems at all on install.
Once I got it up with narrator I gave it a log in but no password, and when it asked to use corona I said no.
That gave me a clean upgrade with the rest of windows waiting on the side for later usage.
On Dec 27, 2017, at 9:19 AM, Hicks Steven (CORNWALL IT SERVICES) via Groups.Io <steven.hicks@...> wrote:

As far as I am aware, the free upgrade ends on the 31st December anyway so this will no longer be a problem after that.

 

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io [mailto:win10@win10.groups.io] On Behalf Of Joseph Lee
Sent: 24 December 2017 17:19
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: [win10] Windows 10 upgrade: 'api-ms-win-core-libraryloader-l1-1-1.dll is missing' error when trying to upgrade from Windows 7 to 10 #MSFTEnable #ADVISORY

 

Hi everyone,

 

For those trying to take advantage of free Windows 10 upgrade for assistive tech users, the following is a recommended community directive:

 

Problem: when trying to upgrade from Windows 7 to 10, the following error appears:

Error: api-ms-win-core-libraryloader-l1-1-1.dll is missing.

 

Steps to reproduce:

  1. From a Windows 7 computer, run Windows 10 Upgrade Assistant.
  2. At some point, an error similar to the one above is displayed.

 

Expected: upgrade proceeds without problems.

Actual: the error pops up with “Retry” button.

Cause: Windows 7 ships with an older version of a required DLL, and Windows 10 Upgrade may not detect it properly. The actual culprit is not the missing library, but a file named wimgapi.dll, the Windows Imaging Format (wim) handler.

 

Possible solution: copy and replace a DLL that ships with Upgrade Assistant with the one found in current Windows installation:

  1. If you haven’t, tell Windows Explorer to show hidden files and show file extensions (Control Panel/Folder Options/View tab).
  2. Navigate to the following folder:

%sysdrive%\Windows\System32

For example, for most users, the path will be C:\Windows\System32.

  1. Locate a DLL named “wimgapi.dll” and copy it to:

%sysdrive%\Windows10Upgrade

For most cases, it’ll be C:\Windows10Upgrade folder. Say “continue” or “yes” when prompted to replace the file.

Solution source: https://community.spiceworks.com/how_to/149217-fix-windows-10-upgrade-error-libraryloader-l1-1-1-is-missing

 

Details:

 

Windows Vista and later uses disk images for Windows installations. Although the setup process has changed over the years, the basic mechanism introduced in 2007 still applies.

 

The setup process goes as follows:

  1. Windows checks various system requirements, such as free disk space, and recently on 64-bit systems, whether certain processor instructions are available (details below).
  2. Once the check is complete, Windows will unpack setup files. Among them are two .wim (windows Image) files named boot.wim and install.wim. This is the most likely step that’s causing the problem described above, as the setup program will look for wimgapi.dll file to handle .wim files. The version that ships with Windows 7 is missing the DLL file noted in the error message (source: https://www.solvusoft.com/en/files/missing-not-found-error/dll/windows/microsoft/windows-8-pro/api-ms-win-core-libraryloader-l1-1-1-dll/)
  3. The boot.wim file is the image for Windows Preinstallation Environment (PE) and will be unpacked to a location that’ll be searched during a reboot, then the computer will restart.
  4. Windows PE that was just unpacked from boot.wim will run, at which point it’ll unpack more files, amongst them install.wim.
  5. Old Windows installation is saved to a folder named windows.old on your internal drive (hard drive or SSD).
  6. The install.wim file contains installation images for all editions of Windows (except Enterprise). Depending on edition chosen (entering a product key, choosing what to install via clean install, or detected during in-place upgrade), the correct installation image will now be unpacked and contents will be copied to your internal drive.
  7. Old data will be migrated to new installation, such as compatible programs, drivers, user data and so on.
  8. Once installation is complete, you’ll be presented with what’s called ‘out of box experience” where you can configure various settings.

 

Notes:

  1. In order to install Windows 10, all x86/x64 processors must be equipped with PAE (Physical Address Extension), SSE2 (Streaming SIMD Extensions 2) and NX (No eXecute).
  2. On 64-bit (x64) systems, the processor must be equipped with CMPXCHG16B (128-bit compare and swap), PREFETCHW (data prefetch, part of 3D Now!) and LAHF/SAHF (load and save flag registers) instructions.
  3. In order to take advantage of Hyper-V and related features (including Windows Defender Application Guard and other virtualization technologies) on 64-bit systems, the processor must come with virtualization features turned on.

 

References:

 

Alternative solution: clean install. Provided that you manage to obtain the ISO file for latest Windows 10 release and create an installation image on a DVD or a USB flash drive (at least 8 GB in size), you can back up your data, boot from the installation media, and use Narrator to perform a clean install. While backing up data, use Magical Jellybean, Belarc Advisor and similar programs to retrieve the 25-character Windows product key, as you’ll need it during the installation process (you can type in a Windows 7, 8 or 8.1 product key and Windows 10 will be activated provided that it isn’t an illegal key). In order to use Narrator during a clean install, the sound card must be detected by the installer, and to start Narrator, press Control+Windows+Enter key (wait about a minute or two after booting to the installation media before invoking this command).

 

Note: the above solution(s) should be verified by people (especially Microsoft staff) before going out as official solution, thus the recommendation tag.

 

Cheers,

Joseph




********************************************************************************************************************

This message may contain confidential information. If you are not the intended recipient please inform the
sender that you have received the message in error before deleting it.
Please do not disclose, copy or distribute information in this e-mail or take any action in relation to its contents. To do so is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful. Thank you for your co-operation.

NHSmail is the secure email and directory service available for all NHS staff in England and Scotland. NHSmail is approved for exchanging patient data and other sensitive information with NHSmail and other accredited email services.

For more information and to find out how you can switch, https://portal.nhs.net/help/joiningnhsmail