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Accessibility feedback: offer Markdown system-wide to give equal access to reading and writing #feedback


Devin Prater
 

Good morning all,

I wrote this feedback to Microsoft, on their accessibility User Voice page. I’d greatly appreciate any votes and sharing of this feedback, if you believe it would be helpful. This feedback encourages Microsoft to add Markdown support to Windows, throughout the system. Markdown allows you to write formatted text using symbols, like *italics*, **bold**, and so on. This allows you to understand, without needing to configure your screen reader, formatting used in books, blog articles, and so on, and to neatly format documents yourself, without needing to hear an almost stream of consciousness style italics on jabbering italics off from your screen reader, which, to me, is very hard to process. When you do not have the setting to speak formatting information enabled, there is no way, aside from checking character by character, to tell if a word is bolded or underlined. It is especially useful in books, for emphasis, and when reading the Bible, to tell if words were added by the translators to improve readability.

It is most important for braille users, as most screen readers do not show formatting in braille, and thus a braille user wouldn’t even know it’s there, unless they configure JAWS or another screen reader to show it to them. Some screen readers use “status cells” to show formatting, but those are imprecise, since any number of a possible 80 cells of braille could be formatted.

More simply, I just want equal access to as much information that a sighted person would get as possible. Some blind people may not need this, and that's fine; just leave it disabled. But, I believe that if an author formats a document, italicizes a word, and so on, then it is probably for a good reason, and we as blind people should be able to quickly and easily understand that. More information is in the feedback:


Thanks so much for any votes or comments. This is very important to me as a writer and reader, especially for braille, so I hope that this gets much support from the community.


 

i have voted.
but i would advise that you write this feedback in the feedback app.

On 6/3/20, Devin Prater <r.d.t.prater@gmail.com> wrote:
Good morning all,

I wrote this feedback to Microsoft, on their accessibility User Voice page.
I’d greatly appreciate any votes and sharing of this feedback, if you
believe it would be helpful. This feedback encourages Microsoft to add
Markdown support to Windows, throughout the system. Markdown allows you to
write formatted text using symbols, like *italics*, **bold**, and so on.
This allows you to understand, without needing to configure your screen
reader, formatting used in books, blog articles, and so on, and to neatly
format documents yourself, without needing to hear an almost stream of
consciousness style italics on jabbering italics off from your screen
reader, which, to me, is very hard to process. When you do not have the
setting to speak formatting information enabled, there is no way, aside from
checking character by character, to tell if a word is bolded or underlined.
It is especially useful in books, for emphasis, and when reading the Bible,
to tell if words were added by the translators to improve readability.

It is most important for braille users, as most screen readers do not show
formatting in braille, and thus a braille user wouldn’t even know it’s
there, unless they configure JAWS or another screen reader to show it to
them. Some screen readers use “status cells” to show formatting, but those
are imprecise, since any number of a possible 80 cells of braille could be
formatted.

More simply, I just want equal access to as much information that a sighted
person would get as possible. Some blind people may not need this, and
that's fine; just leave it disabled. But, I believe that if an author
formats a document, italicizes a word, and so on, then it is probably for a
good reason, and we as blind people should be able to quickly and easily
understand that. More information is in the feedback:

https://microsoftaccessibility.uservoice.com/forums/307429-microsoft-accessibility-feedback/suggestions/40570399-markdown-systemwide-for-rich-text-writing-and-read
<https://microsoftaccessibility.uservoice.com/forums/307429-microsoft-accessibility-feedback/suggestions/40570399-markdown-systemwide-for-rich-text-writing-and-read>

Thanks so much for any votes or comments. This is very important to me as a
writer and reader, especially for braille, so I hope that this gets much
support from the community.


--
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austinpinto.xaviers@gmail.com
follow me on twitter.
austinmpinto
contact me on skype.
austin.pinto3


Devin Prater
 

Thanks, I wasn’t sure if the user voice site was enough, or if this needed to be in multiple places. I’ll definitely do the feedback app as well.

On Jun 3, 2020, at 6:59 AM, Austin Pinto <austinpinto.xaviers@gmail.com> wrote:

i have voted.
but i would advise that you write this feedback in the feedback app.

On 6/3/20, Devin Prater <r.d.t.prater@gmail.com> wrote:
Good morning all,

I wrote this feedback to Microsoft, on their accessibility User Voice page.
I’d greatly appreciate any votes and sharing of this feedback, if you
believe it would be helpful. This feedback encourages Microsoft to add
Markdown support to Windows, throughout the system. Markdown allows you to
write formatted text using symbols, like *italics*, **bold**, and so on.
This allows you to understand, without needing to configure your screen
reader, formatting used in books, blog articles, and so on, and to neatly
format documents yourself, without needing to hear an almost stream of
consciousness style italics on jabbering italics off from your screen
reader, which, to me, is very hard to process. When you do not have the
setting to speak formatting information enabled, there is no way, aside from
checking character by character, to tell if a word is bolded or underlined.
It is especially useful in books, for emphasis, and when reading the Bible,
to tell if words were added by the translators to improve readability.

It is most important for braille users, as most screen readers do not show
formatting in braille, and thus a braille user wouldn’t even know it’s
there, unless they configure JAWS or another screen reader to show it to
them. Some screen readers use “status cells” to show formatting, but those
are imprecise, since any number of a possible 80 cells of braille could be
formatted.

More simply, I just want equal access to as much information that a sighted
person would get as possible. Some blind people may not need this, and
that's fine; just leave it disabled. But, I believe that if an author
formats a document, italicizes a word, and so on, then it is probably for a
good reason, and we as blind people should be able to quickly and easily
understand that. More information is in the feedback:

https://microsoftaccessibility.uservoice.com/forums/307429-microsoft-accessibility-feedback/suggestions/40570399-markdown-systemwide-for-rich-text-writing-and-read
<https://microsoftaccessibility.uservoice.com/forums/307429-microsoft-accessibility-feedback/suggestions/40570399-markdown-systemwide-for-rich-text-writing-and-read>

Thanks so much for any votes or comments. This is very important to me as a
writer and reader, especially for braille, so I hope that this gets much
support from the community.



--
search for me on facebook, google+, orkut..
austinpinto.xaviers@gmail.com
follow me on twitter.
austinmpinto
contact me on skype.
austin.pinto3



 

And after you've put it in the Feedback Hub, be sure to get the sharable link and post it here so that those who wish to do so can upvote and/or add comments.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363

Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.

    ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore


Sarah k Alawami
 

I actually never use "user voice", and you could have submitted this via windows f.

Anyway there are I believe external editors, and I write my markdown stuff in jarte even though markdown is not supported in windows officially. I'm confident in all of my code. Then I just save it as an md file. So I really don't see the point of the feedback.

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On 3 Jun 2020, at 4:30, Devin Prater wrote:

Good morning all,

I wrote this feedback to Microsoft, on their accessibility User Voice page. I’d greatly appreciate any votes and sharing of this feedback, if you believe it would be helpful. This feedback encourages Microsoft to add Markdown support to Windows, throughout the system. Markdown allows you to write formatted text using symbols, like *italics*, **bold**, and so on. This allows you to understand, without needing to configure your screen reader, formatting used in books, blog articles, and so on, and to neatly format documents yourself, without needing to hear an almost stream of consciousness style italics on jabbering italics off from your screen reader, which, to me, is very hard to process. When you do not have the setting to speak formatting information enabled, there is no way, aside from checking character by character, to tell if a word is bolded or underlined. It is especially useful in books, for emphasis, and when reading the Bible, to tell if words were added by the translators to improve readability.

It is most important for braille users, as most screen readers do not show formatting in braille, and thus a braille user wouldn’t even know it’s there, unless they configure JAWS or another screen reader to show it to them. Some screen readers use “status cells” to show formatting, but those are imprecise, since any number of a possible 80 cells of braille could be formatted.

More simply, I just want equal access to as much information that a sighted person would get as possible. Some blind people may not need this, and that's fine; just leave it disabled. But, I believe that if an author formats a document, italicizes a word, and so on, then it is probably for a good reason, and we as blind people should be able to quickly and easily understand that. More information is in the feedback:


Thanks so much for any votes or comments. This is very important to me as a writer and reader, especially for braille, so I hope that this gets much support from the community.


 

On Wed, Jun 3, 2020 at 11:39 AM, Sarah k Alawami wrote:
So I really don't see the point of the feedback.
Nor do I, to be honest, but that's not the point.   Since we all need/want different things knowing the best mechanisms to communicate those needs (to Microsoft, in this case) is a generally important discussion.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363

Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.

    ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore


Devin Prater
 

Thanks to all who have voted on this on User Voice; here is the Feedback Hub link:

https://aka.ms/AA8lqjz
Devin Prater
sent from Gmail.


On Wed, Jun 3, 2020 at 10:57 AM Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:
On Wed, Jun 3, 2020 at 11:39 AM, Sarah k Alawami wrote:
So I really don't see the point of the feedback.
Nor do I, to be honest, but that's not the point.   Since we all need/want different things knowing the best mechanisms to communicate those needs (to Microsoft, in this case) is a generally important discussion.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363

Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.

    ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore