Topics

Is there any accessible recovery utility when you are NOT running from within Windows?


 

I know very well that if you are doing a recovery from within Windows itself then a screen reader can be on and functioning at least through the steps to kick off the recovery itself.  But that's the very rare recovery, used generally by individuals who have a machine they like to use for experiments and where they want to take it back to its baseline state after said experiments are completed.

I'm talking about a recovery you'd be doing if, say, your main system drive crashed and burned and you needed to restore the full system image you took to your backup drive to a brand new disk drive purchased to replace the dead one.

I have been in the IT business and assistive technology business for a very long time now, and do not know of a single recovery utility that works this way under those circumstances, as they run as self-contained bootable worlds where no screen readers exist.

I worry a lot more about people taking full system image backups in case they need them in the event of disaster.  Those disasters are infrequent and needing a sighted tech is often part of that (whether you're blind or sighted) as few have ever done a recovery.

But I'm getting tired of getting push back because I am simply reporting that, to my knowledge, there exists no recovery utility that is accessible when what is being attempted is the restoration of a full system image on to a new (or, at the very least, clean) system disk drive on a system that, at that moment, does not have Windows on it.  

If a fully accessible recovery utility, that can be used when you have a machine where Windows does not exist because its main drive died that can restore a Windows full system image to a new drive on it, please share.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363

Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.

    ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore


Sarah k Alawami
 

I remember several years ago someone sold a windows PE disk that would come up talking with NVDA and it could be booted from, I can't remember who they are as I quit talking to that person years ago. Sorry if this seems scattered a bit. I started writing this before work and finished after my shift.

Google though talking windows PE disks. Is this what you are looking for? If not, I really don't think such a thing exists. A way to get into the boot menu that talks would be nice, then we can choose an image of windows 10 and install it onto the dead drive.

Sarah Alawami, owner of TFFP. . For more info go to our website.

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On 27 Apr 2020, at 14:47, Brian Vogel wrote:

I know very well that if you are doing a recovery from within Windows itself then a screen reader can be on and functioning at least through the steps to kick off the recovery itself.  But that's the very rare recovery, used generally by individuals who have a machine they like to use for experiments and where they want to take it back to its baseline state after said experiments are completed.

I'm talking about a recovery you'd be doing if, say, your main system drive crashed and burned and you needed to restore the full system image you took to your backup drive to a brand new disk drive purchased to replace the dead one.

I have been in the IT business and assistive technology business for a very long time now, and do not know of a single recovery utility that works this way under those circumstances, as they run as self-contained bootable worlds where no screen readers exist.

I worry a lot more about people taking full system image backups in case they need them in the event of disaster.  Those disasters are infrequent and needing a sighted tech is often part of that (whether you're blind or sighted) as few have ever done a recovery.

But I'm getting tired of getting push back because I am simply reporting that, to my knowledge, there exists no recovery utility that is accessible when what is being attempted is the restoration of a full system image on to a new (or, at the very least, clean) system disk drive on a system that, at that moment, does not have Windows on it.  

If a fully accessible recovery utility, that can be used when you have a machine where Windows does not exist because its main drive died that can restore a Windows full system image to a new drive on it, please share.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363

Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.

    ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore


 

Sarah,

             I am aware of talking Windows PE, but I am still unaware of how one would use it to do a recovery from a full system image backup made by any one of a wide number of third-party backup utilities.

             There are even some, and Macrium Reflect comes to mind, that allow you to add their recovery manager to the actual system boot menu, but then you boot into their recovery manager, which isn't Windows, and under which I know of no screen reader that can run.

              I absolutely get that there are blind individuals (just as there are sighted ones) who want to do a recovery independently, but what I have never been able to find is any way that can be done.  And I will repeat, even if you cannot do a recovery independently, and many cannot, it's still critical to be taking full system image backups so that someone who can is able to do said recovery in the unfortunate situation where it would be needed.  I've always been way more worried about getting my clients, whether blind or sighted, to take backups routinely than I ever was (and still am) about their being able to do a recovery independently.  Most simply can't, won't, or don't want to.  But having that backup so someone can is absolutely vital.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363

Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.

    ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore


Richard Kuzma
 

Good evening,

For what it is worth, here is what I do and have done successfully.

If my main drive crashes, I put in a new drive and install a fresh copy of windows seven or ten.

Then coonect the bad drive up via a usb cable and restore the backup image to that drive.

Than swipe the drives out.

I know this is kinda a tech thing, but it does work.

Other than that route, I cant figure out a way to do it.

Only other thing would be to use a second pc to restore it via usb.

Ok, tanks

Rich

 

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io [mailto:win10@win10.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Monday, April 27, 2020 7:21 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Is there any accessible recovery utility when you are NOT running from within Windows?

 

Sarah,

             I am aware of talking Windows PE, but I am still unaware of how one would use it to do a recovery from a full system image backup made by any one of a wide number of third-party backup utilities.

             There are even some, and Macrium Reflect comes to mind, that allow you to add their recovery manager to the actual system boot menu, but then you boot into their recovery manager, which isn't Windows, and under which I know of no screen reader that can run.

              I absolutely get that there are blind individuals (just as there are sighted ones) who want to do a recovery independently, but what I have never been able to find is any way that can be done.  And I will repeat, even if you cannot do a recovery independently, and many cannot, it's still critical to be taking full system image backups so that someone who can is able to do said recovery in the unfortunate situation where it would be needed.  I've always been way more worried about getting my clients, whether blind or sighted, to take backups routinely than I ever was (and still am) about their being able to do a recovery independently.  Most simply can't, won't, or don't want to.  But having that backup so someone can is absolutely vital.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363

Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.

    ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore


Hicks Steven (CORNWALL IT SERVICES)
 

Hi,

 

I Agree, you should always have at least one data backup anyway.

Microsoft Have made huge steps forward with accessibility in my opinion, you can now re-install Microsoft Windows from scratch using Narator as long as you can boot from a disk or usb media.

 

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: 28 April 2020 00:21
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Is there any accessible recovery utility when you are NOT running from within Windows?

 

Sarah,

             I am aware of talking Windows PE, but I am still unaware of how one would use it to do a recovery from a full system image backup made by any one of a wide number of third-party backup utilities.

             There are even some, and Macrium Reflect comes to mind, that allow you to add their recovery manager to the actual system boot menu, but then you boot into their recovery manager, which isn't Windows, and under which I know of no screen reader that can run.

              I absolutely get that there are blind individuals (just as there are sighted ones) who want to do a recovery independently, but what I have never been able to find is any way that can be done.  And I will repeat, even if you cannot do a recovery independently, and many cannot, it's still critical to be taking full system image backups so that someone who can is able to do said recovery in the unfortunate situation where it would be needed.  I've always been way more worried about getting my clients, whether blind or sighted, to take backups routinely than I ever was (and still am) about their being able to do a recovery independently.  Most simply can't, won't, or don't want to.  But having that backup so someone can is absolutely vital.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363

Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.

    ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore



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Eric Yip
 

Firstly, sorry for my poor English.
I did the following step to backup or restore the windows system. I used terabyte Image for Windows for backup or restore purpose.

I create a portable version of Image for Windows and put the files to ifw folder.
I downloaded a Windows 10 ISO Image File.
Also downloaded Rufus portable version.
Take an USB thumb drive and insert to the computer.
Run Rufus portable to write the  Windows 10 ISO Image contents to USB thumb drive.
copied ifw folder to USB thumb drive.

After the above step, to backup or restore windows system:
Insert the USB thumb drive to computer.
Restart the computer and press F12 to goto boot menu.
From the boot menu use arrow keys to select USB thumb drive and press enter.
Wait for about 1 minute for launching Windows setup.
Press Win+Ctrl+enter to start Narrator.
After that, press Shift+F10 to goto command prompt.
Type "e:", enter to change to USB thumb drive.
type "cd \ifw" to change to image for windows folder.
type "imagwe64" and press enter to start Image for Windows.
Follow the screen prom and choose the preference options to backup or restore Windows.
After the program finish the job and close, it come back to command prompt window.
I press Alt+F4 to close the window.
and press Alt+F4 again to close Windows setup.
A dialog box come out ask "Are you sure you want to cancel Windows installation?" I selected "yes".
After that, the computer reboot and launch Windows 10 normally.


Richard Kuzma
 

Good morning,

Very, very nice

I may have to try this just to experiment.

Thanks

 

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io [mailto:win10@win10.groups.io] On Behalf Of Eric Yip via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, April 28, 2020 7:07 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Is there any accessible recovery utility when you are NOT running from within Windows?

 

Firstly, sorry for my poor English.
I did the following step to backup or restore the windows system. I used terabyte Image for Windows for backup or restore purpose.

I create a portable version of Image for Windows and put the files to ifw folder.
I downloaded a Windows 10 ISO Image File.
Also downloaded Rufus portable version.
Take an USB thumb drive and insert to the computer.
Run Rufus portable to write the  Windows 10 ISO Image contents to USB thumb drive.
copied ifw folder to USB thumb drive.

After the above step, to backup or restore windows system:
Insert the USB thumb drive to computer.
Restart the computer and press F12 to goto boot menu.
From the boot menu use arrow keys to select USB thumb drive and press enter.
Wait for about 1 minute for launching Windows setup.
Press Win+Ctrl+enter to start Narrator.
After that, press Shift+F10 to goto command prompt.
Type "e:", enter to change to USB thumb drive.
type "cd \ifw" to change to image for windows folder.
type "imagwe64" and press enter to start Image for Windows.
Follow the screen prom and choose the preference options to backup or restore Windows.
After the program finish the job and close, it come back to command prompt window.
I press Alt+F4 to close the window.
and press Alt+F4 again to close Windows setup.
A dialog box come out ask "Are you sure you want to cancel Windows installation?" I selected "yes".
After that, the computer reboot and launch Windows 10 normally.


Kevin Cussick
 

Hi, the program in question is winstaller, Yes You can make a bootable disk and it has Nvda on it but I just do not know if this is around any more. I do not talk to the developer ether but can not go inot why on any list.

On 28/04/2020 00:00, Sarah k Alawami wrote:
I remember several years ago someone sold a windows PE disk that would come up talking with NVDA and it could be booted from, I can't remember who they are as I quit talking to that person years ago. Sorry if this seems scattered a bit. I started writing this before work and finished after my shift.
Google though talking windows PE disks. Is this what you are looking for? If not, I really don't think such a thing exists. A way to get into the boot menu that talks would be nice, then we can choose an image of windows 10 and install it onto the dead drive.
Sarah Alawami, owner of TFFP. . For more info go to our website. <http://www.tffppodcast.com>
to subscribe to the feed click here <http://feeds.feedburner.com/tffp> and you can also follow us on twitter <http://twitter.com/tffppodcast>
Our discord <http://discord.tffppodcast.com> is where you will know when we go live on [twitch.](http://twitch.tv/ke7zum] Feel free to give the channel a follow and see what is up there.
For stream archives, products you can buy and more visit my main lbry page <http://lbry.tv/@ke7zum> and my tffp lbry page <http://lbry.tv/@tffppodcast> YOu will also be able to buy some of my products and eBooks there.
Finally, to become a patron and help support the podcast go here <Http://patreon.com/tffppodcast>
On 27 Apr 2020, at 14:47, Brian Vogel wrote:
I know very well that if you are doing a recovery from within
Windows itself then a screen reader can be on and functioning at
least through the steps to kick off the recovery itself.  But that's
the very rare recovery, used generally by individuals who have a
machine they like to use for experiments and where they want to take
it back to its baseline state after said experiments are completed.
I'm talking about a recovery you'd be doing if, say, your main
system drive crashed and burned and you needed to restore the full
system image you took to your backup drive to a brand new disk drive
purchased to replace the dead one.
I have been in the IT business and assistive technology business for
a very long time now, and do not know of a single recovery utility
that works this way under those circumstances, as they run as
self-contained bootable worlds where no screen readers exist.
I worry a lot more about people taking full system image backups in
case they need them in the event of disaster.  Those disasters are
infrequent and needing a sighted tech is often part of that (whether
you're blind or sighted) as few have ever done a recovery.
But I'm getting tired of getting push back because I am simply
reporting that, to my knowledge, there exists no recovery utility
that is accessible when what is being attempted is the restoration
of a full system image on to a new (or, at the very least, clean)
system disk drive on a system that, at that moment, does not have
Windows on it.
If a fully accessible recovery utility, that can be used when you
have a machine where Windows does not exist because its main drive
died that can restore a Windows full system image to a new drive on
it, please share.
--
Brian *-*Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363
*/Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is
always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat,
plausible, and wrong./*
    ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA /The Sage of Baltimore/


 

Hmmm well that actually works.



On 28/04/2020 11:07 pm, Eric Yip via groups.io wrote:
Firstly, sorry for my poor English.
I did the following step to backup or restore the windows system. I used terabyte Image for Windows for backup or restore purpose.

I create a portable version of Image for Windows and put the files to ifw folder.
I downloaded a Windows 10 ISO Image File.
Also downloaded Rufus portable version.
Take an USB thumb drive and insert to the computer.
Run Rufus portable to write the  Windows 10 ISO Image contents to USB thumb drive.
copied ifw folder to USB thumb drive.

After the above step, to backup or restore windows system:
Insert the USB thumb drive to computer.
Restart the computer and press F12 to goto boot menu.
From the boot menu use arrow keys to select USB thumb drive and press enter.
Wait for about 1 minute for launching Windows setup.
Press Win+Ctrl+enter to start Narrator.
After that, press Shift+F10 to goto command prompt.
Type "e:", enter to change to USB thumb drive.
type "cd \ifw" to change to image for windows folder.
type "imagwe64" and press enter to start Image for Windows.
Follow the screen prom and choose the preference options to backup or restore Windows.
After the program finish the job and close, it come back to command prompt window.
I press Alt+F4 to close the window.
and press Alt+F4 again to close Windows setup.
A dialog box come out ask "Are you sure you want to cancel Windows installation?" I selected "yes".
After that, the computer reboot and launch Windows 10 normally.


Richard Kuzma
 

Hello there,

How do you create a portable version of image for windows please?

Thanks,

Rich

 

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io [mailto:win10@win10.groups.io] On Behalf Of Shaun Everiss
Sent: Tuesday, April 28, 2020 5:55 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Is there any accessible recovery utility when you are NOT running from within Windows?

 

Hmmm well that actually works.

 

 

On 28/04/2020 11:07 pm, Eric Yip via groups.io wrote:

Firstly, sorry for my poor English.
I did the following step to backup or restore the windows system. I used terabyte Image for Windows for backup or restore purpose.

I create a portable version of Image for Windows and put the files to ifw folder.
I downloaded a Windows 10 ISO Image File.
Also downloaded Rufus portable version.
Take an USB thumb drive and insert to the computer.
Run Rufus portable to write the  Windows 10 ISO Image contents to USB thumb drive.
copied ifw folder to USB thumb drive.

After the above step, to backup or restore windows system:
Insert the USB thumb drive to computer.
Restart the computer and press F12 to goto boot menu.
From the boot menu use arrow keys to select USB thumb drive and press enter.
Wait for about 1 minute for launching Windows setup.
Press Win+Ctrl+enter to start Narrator.
After that, press Shift+F10 to goto command prompt.
Type "e:", enter to change to USB thumb drive.
type "cd \ifw" to change to image for windows folder.
type "imagwe64" and press enter to start Image for Windows.
Follow the screen prom and choose the preference options to backup or restore Windows.
After the program finish the job and close, it come back to command prompt window.
I press Alt+F4 to close the window.
and press Alt+F4 again to close Windows setup.
A dialog box come out ask "Are you sure you want to cancel Windows installation?" I selected "yes".
After that, the computer reboot and launch Windows 10 normally.


Eric Yip
 

On Wed, Apr 29, 2020 at 07:06 AM, Richard Kuzma wrote:

Hello there,

How do you create a portable version of image for windows please?

Thanks,

Rich

 

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io [mailto:win10@win10.groups.io] On Behalf Of Shaun Everiss
Sent: Tuesday, April 28, 2020 5:55 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Is there any accessible recovery utility when you are NOT running from within Windows?

 

Hmmm well that actually works.

 

 

On 28/04/2020 11:07 pm, Eric Yip via groups.io wrote:

Firstly, sorry for my poor English.
I did the following step to backup or restore the windows system. I used terabyte Image for Windows for backup or restore purpose.

I create a portable version of Image for Windows and put the files to ifw folder.
I downloaded a Windows 10 ISO Image File.
Also downloaded Rufus portable version.
Take an USB thumb drive and insert to the computer.
Run Rufus portable to write the  Windows 10 ISO Image contents to USB thumb drive.
copied ifw folder to USB thumb drive.

After the above step, to backup or restore windows system:
Insert the USB thumb drive to computer.
Restart the computer and press F12 to goto boot menu.
From the boot menu use arrow keys to select USB thumb drive and press enter.
Wait for about 1 minute for launching Windows setup.
Press Win+Ctrl+enter to start Narrator.
After that, press Shift+F10 to goto command prompt.
Type "e:", enter to change to USB thumb drive.
type "cd \ifw" to change to image for windows folder.
type "imagwe64" and press enter to start Image for Windows.
Follow the screen prom and choose the preference options to backup or restore Windows.
After the program finish the job and close, it come back to command prompt window.
I press Alt+F4 to close the window.
and press Alt+F4 again to close Windows setup.
A dialog box come out ask "Are you sure you want to cancel Windows installation?" I selected "yes".
After that, the computer reboot and launch Windows 10 normally.

 


Richard Kuzma
 

Got it and it created it perfectly.

Thanks so  much

What a great learning experience

 

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io [mailto:win10@win10.groups.io] On Behalf Of Eric Yip via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, April 28, 2020 9:02 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Is there any accessible recovery utility when you are NOT running from within Windows?

 

Please visit the following url:
https://techtalk.groups.io/g/main/message/51151?p=,,,100,0,0,0::Created,,%22Image+for+Windows%2C+Creating+An+Image%22,100,2,0,5452993


On Wed, Apr 29, 2020 at 07:06 AM, Richard Kuzma wrote:

Hello there,

How do you create a portable version of image for windows please?

Thanks,

Rich

 

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io [mailto:win10@win10.groups.io] On Behalf Of Shaun Everiss
Sent: Tuesday, April 28, 2020 5:55 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Is there any accessible recovery utility when you are NOT running from within Windows?

 

Hmmm well that actually works.

 

 

On 28/04/2020 11:07 pm, Eric Yip via groups.io wrote:

Firstly, sorry for my poor English.
I did the following step to backup or restore the windows system. I used terabyte Image for Windows for backup or restore purpose.

I create a portable version of Image for Windows and put the files to ifw folder.
I downloaded a Windows 10 ISO Image File.
Also downloaded Rufus portable version.
Take an USB thumb drive and insert to the computer.
Run Rufus portable to write the  Windows 10 ISO Image contents to USB thumb drive.
copied ifw folder to USB thumb drive.

After the above step, to backup or restore windows system:
Insert the USB thumb drive to computer.
Restart the computer and press F12 to goto boot menu.
From the boot menu use arrow keys to select USB thumb drive and press enter.
Wait for about 1 minute for launching Windows setup.
Press Win+Ctrl+enter to start Narrator.
After that, press Shift+F10 to goto command prompt.
Type "e:", enter to change to USB thumb drive.
type "cd \ifw" to change to image for windows folder.
type "imagwe64" and press enter to start Image for Windows.
Follow the screen prom and choose the preference options to backup or restore Windows.
After the program finish the job and close, it come back to command prompt window.
I press Alt+F4 to close the window.
and press Alt+F4 again to close Windows setup.
A dialog box come out ask "Are you sure you want to cancel Windows installation?" I selected "yes".
After that, the computer reboot and launch Windows 10 normally.

 


Jason White
 

CloneZilla under Linux was accessible (with a text-based interface) when I last tried it.

 

It’s available in the GRML distribution (https://www.grml.org/) and probably others.

 

Grml provides Speakup and BRLTTY (for speech and braille access, respectively).

 

Clonezilla will create and restore a backup of any partition, including a Windows partition.

 

So I think the correct answer to your question is that there does exist an accessible solution. Some people might say that it isn’t suitable for non-technical end users, but that wasn’t part of the question; and some of us are well beyond the “non-technical end-user” category.

 

From: <win10@win10.groups.io> on behalf of Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
Reply-To: <win10@win10.groups.io>
Date: Monday, April 27, 2020 at 17:47
To: <win10@win10.groups.io>
Subject: [win10] Is there any accessible recovery utility when you are NOT running from within Windows?

 

I know very well that if you are doing a recovery from within Windows itself then a screen reader can be on and functioning at least through the steps to kick off the recovery itself.  But that's the very rare recovery, used generally by individuals who have a machine they like to use for experiments and where they want to take it back to its baseline state after said experiments are completed.

I'm talking about a recovery you'd be doing if, say, your main system drive crashed and burned and you needed to restore the full system image you took to your backup drive to a brand new disk drive purchased to replace the dead one.

I have been in the IT business and assistive technology business for a very long time now, and do not know of a single recovery utility that works this way under those circumstances, as they run as self-contained bootable worlds where no screen readers exist.

I worry a lot more about people taking full system image backups in case they need them in the event of disaster.  Those disasters are infrequent and needing a sighted tech is often part of that (whether you're blind or sighted) as few have ever done a recovery.

But I'm getting tired of getting push back because I am simply reporting that, to my knowledge, there exists no recovery utility that is accessible when what is being attempted is the restoration of a full system image on to a new (or, at the very least, clean) system disk drive on a system that, at that moment, does not have Windows on it.  

If a fully accessible recovery utility, that can be used when you have a machine where Windows does not exist because its main drive died that can restore a Windows full system image to a new drive on it, please share.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363

Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.

    ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore