Topics

System Restore?


Roger Stewart
 

I can't seem to understand the system restore in Win 10. Not intuitive like Win 7. I go there, but all that's there is create now. There are no previous restore points to go back to. It should automatically create a restore point every time you get an update or major change to the system. I used to have a list of about 5 dates in Win 7 and I just choose one of these and it will restore to that date. How do you make this work in Win 10? Any help much appreciated. If I choose the create now button it will say it will automatically stamp it with the current date, but then I hit OK, and I just get that silly sound meaning that Windows doesn't know what to do with the command I just sent.


Thanks much!


Roger


Lino Morales
 

Hi Rog. Make sure file protection is off. Find that setting in CTRL panel.

On 4/1/2017 8:15 PM, Roger Stewart wrote:
I can't seem to understand the system restore in Win 10. Not intuitive like Win 7. I go there, but all that's there is create now. There are no previous restore points to go back to. It should automatically create a restore point every time you get an update or major change to the system. I used to have a list of about 5 dates in Win 7 and I just choose one of these and it will restore to that date. How do you make this work in Win 10? Any help much appreciated. If I choose the create now button it will say it will automatically stamp it with the current date, but then I hit OK, and I just get that silly sound meaning that Windows doesn't know what to do with the command I just sent.


Thanks much!


Roger




Lino Morales
 

Sorry Rog I meant on. Sorry.

On 4/2/2017 6:54 PM, Lino Morales wrote:
Hi Rog. Make sure file protection is off. Find that setting in CTRL panel.


On 4/1/2017 8:15 PM, Roger Stewart wrote:
I can't seem to understand the system restore in Win 10. Not intuitive like Win 7. I go there, but all that's there is create now. There are no previous restore points to go back to. It should automatically create a restore point every time you get an update or major change to the system. I used to have a list of about 5 dates in Win 7 and I just choose one of these and it will restore to that date. How do you make this work in Win 10? Any help much appreciated. If I choose the create now button it will say it will automatically stamp it with the current date, but then I hit OK, and I just get that silly sound meaning that Windows doesn't know what to do with the command I just sent.


Thanks much!


Roger






Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

Roger,

           I am not noticing anything too terribly different in the System Restore function in Windows 10 compared to Windows 7, but I don't have my Windows 7 laptop handy to compare to.

           Once you've gone to Control Panel, System Item, System Protection Link the System Properties dialog opens to the System Protection tab.  If you activate the System Restore button you then get the Introduction Dialog to System Restore on which you hit the Next button.  At this point a dialog appears that allows you to select what restore point you want, but, I do think they changed this from Windows 7.  I seem to remember the list of restore points under Windows 7 showing all of those available in reverse chronological order, but under Windows 10 the default is to only display the most recent.  There is a checkbox in this dialog for, "Show more restore points," which you must check if you want to see restore points other than the most recently taken one.  In my case there are only four, and two of those were automatically taken by the Windows Update process when a critical update was applied.

            This dialog, once all restore points are shown, looks and behaves either exactly like or very nearly exactly like Windows 7 in that you select the one you want, activate the Next button, and a system restore to that restore point will be attempted.  Whether it works or not is another story, as I've had distinctly mixed results with System Restore over the years.
--
Brian

    . . . it misses the point that even if you eliminated all cultural biases, human beings would still form stereotypes.  It's simply how the brain works.

            ~ Scott Safier,  March 10, 2004


Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

Also, what Lino mentions about Protection Settings being On or Off for a given drive on your system are found in a list directly after the "System Restore" button in the System Protection tab of the System Properties dialog.  It should be On by default for your main drive and any other drive partitions you might create, but will be Off for external drives (if connected at the moment) and the recovery drive (usually D:).   The list is labeled Protection Settings.
--
Brian

    . . . it misses the point that even if you eliminated all cultural biases, human beings would still form stereotypes.  It's simply how the brain works.

            ~ Scott Safier,  March 10, 2004


Roger Stewart
 

I'm dead right out of the box on this one!  In Control Panel, I have nothing called system items on this machine.  Maybe you have a different flavor of windows than I do but I can't find it at all. Closest I can come is just System, but in there is nothing called system items or even just items.

Thanks for trying though.

Roger








On 4/2/2017 6:37 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

Roger,

           I am not noticing anything too terribly different in the System Restore function in Windows 10 compared to Windows 7, but I don't have my Windows 7 laptop handy to compare to.

           Once you've gone to Control Panel, System Item, System Protection Link the System Properties dialog opens to the System Protection tab.  If you activate the System Restore button you then get the Introduction Dialog to System Restore on which you hit the Next button.  At this point a dialog appears that allows you to select what restore point you want, but, I do think they changed this from Windows 7.  I seem to remember the list of restore points under Windows 7 showing all of those available in reverse chronological order, but under Windows 10 the default is to only display the most recent.  There is a checkbox in this dialog for, "Show more restore points," which you must check if you want to see restore points other than the most recently taken one.  In my case there are only four, and two of those were automatically taken by the Windows Update process when a critical update was applied.

            This dialog, once all restore points are shown, looks and behaves either exactly like or very nearly exactly like Windows 7 in that you select the one you want, activate the Next button, and a system restore to that restore point will be attempted.  Whether it works or not is another story, as I've had distinctly mixed results with System Restore over the years.
--
Brian

    . . . it misses the point that even if you eliminated all cultural biases, human beings would still form stereotypes.  It's simply how the brain works.

            ~ Scott Safier,  March 10, 2004



Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

"System" is the "System item".  I don't know exactly what they call the individual things you can click on in Control Panel, so I was trying to separate the item for System from, say, the item for Home Group or User Accounts or File History or . . . 
--
Brian

    . . . it misses the point that even if you eliminated all cultural biases, human beings would still form stereotypes.  It's simply how the brain works.

            ~ Scott Safier,  March 10, 2004


Roger Stewart
 

I just searched for system restore and got to create a restore point. I found a configure button and when I choose it, it says I'm using 4.7 GB for system restore points but there's no list of points that I can restore to at all.  Yes, this is very strange to me compared to Win 7.  Radically different. I need someone who is familiar with how this works in Win 10 to help here.

Roger









On 4/2/2017 6:37 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

Roger,

           I am not noticing anything too terribly different in the System Restore function in Windows 10 compared to Windows 7, but I don't have my Windows 7 laptop handy to compare to.

           Once you've gone to Control Panel, System Item, System Protection Link the System Properties dialog opens to the System Protection tab.  If you activate the System Restore button you then get the Introduction Dialog to System Restore on which you hit the Next button.  At this point a dialog appears that allows you to select what restore point you want, but, I do think they changed this from Windows 7.  I seem to remember the list of restore points under Windows 7 showing all of those available in reverse chronological order, but under Windows 10 the default is to only display the most recent.  There is a checkbox in this dialog for, "Show more restore points," which you must check if you want to see restore points other than the most recently taken one.  In my case there are only four, and two of those were automatically taken by the Windows Update process when a critical update was applied.

            This dialog, once all restore points are shown, looks and behaves either exactly like or very nearly exactly like Windows 7 in that you select the one you want, activate the Next button, and a system restore to that restore point will be attempted.  Whether it works or not is another story, as I've had distinctly mixed results with System Restore over the years.
--
Brian

    . . . it misses the point that even if you eliminated all cultural biases, human beings would still form stereotypes.  It's simply how the brain works.

            ~ Scott Safier,  March 10, 2004



 

Same here, it all looks pretty similar. Good thing I took a look, though, I noticed my system protection was turned off. I turned it on now and created a restore point. Does anybody have any idea what is a recommended disk size to allow? My laptop has a 512 Gb (about 476 Gb actual) SSD. For now I set it to 2% which is a bit less than 10 Gb.

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io [mailto:win10@win10.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Sunday, April 2, 2017 4:38 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] System Restore?

 

Roger,

           I am not noticing anything too terribly different in the System Restore function in Windows 10 compared to Windows 7, but I don't have my Windows 7 laptop handy to compare to.

           Once you've gone to Control Panel, System Item, System Protection Link the System Properties dialog opens to the System Protection tab.  If you activate the System Restore button you then get the Introduction Dialog to System Restore on which you hit the Next button.  At this point a dialog appears that allows you to select what restore point you want, but, I do think they changed this from Windows 7.  I seem to remember the list of restore points under Windows 7 showing all of those available in reverse chronological order, but under Windows 10 the default is to only display the most recent.  There is a checkbox in this dialog for, "Show more restore points," which you must check if you want to see restore points other than the most recently taken one.  In my case there are only four, and two of those were automatically taken by the Windows Update process when a critical update was applied.

            This dialog, once all restore points are shown, looks and behaves either exactly like or very nearly exactly like Windows 7 in that you select the one you want, activate the Next button, and a system restore to that restore point will be attempted.  Whether it works or not is another story, as I've had distinctly mixed results with System Restore over the years.
--
Brian

    . . . it misses the point that even if you eliminated all cultural biases, human beings would still form stereotypes.  It's simply how the brain works.

            ~ Scott Safier,  March 10, 2004


James Bentley
 

You may get many different opinions but I would set it at least at 7% and maybe as high as 10%.
 
James B
 
 
 

Sent: Monday, April 03, 2017 12:34 AM
Subject: Re: [win10] System Restore?
 

Same here, it all looks pretty similar. Good thing I took a look, though, I noticed my system protection was turned off. I turned it on now and created a restore point. Does anybody have any idea what is a recommended disk size to allow? My laptop has a 512 Gb (about 476 Gb actual) SSD. For now I set it to 2% which is a bit less than 10 Gb.

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io [mailto:win10@win10.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Sunday, April 2, 2017 4:38 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] System Restore?

 

Roger,

           I am not noticing anything too terribly different in the System Restore function in Windows 10 compared to Windows 7, but I don't have my Windows 7 laptop handy to compare to.

           Once you've gone to Control Panel, System Item, System Protection Link the System Properties dialog opens to the System Protection tab.  If you activate the System Restore button you then get the Introduction Dialog to System Restore on which you hit the Next button.  At this point a dialog appears that allows you to select what restore point you want, but, I do think they changed this from Windows 7.  I seem to remember the list of restore points under Windows 7 showing all of those available in reverse chronological order, but under Windows 10 the default is to only display the most recent.  There is a checkbox in this dialog for, "Show more restore points," which you must check if you want to see restore points other than the most recently taken one.  In my case there are only four, and two of those were automatically taken by the Windows Update process when a critical update was applied.

            This dialog, once all restore points are shown, looks and behaves either exactly like or very nearly exactly like Windows 7 in that you select the one you want, activate the Next button, and a system restore to that restore point will be attempted.  Whether it works or not is another story, as I've had distinctly mixed results with System Restore over the years.
--
Brian

    . . . it misses the point that even if you eliminated all cultural biases, human beings would still form stereotypes.  It's simply how the brain works.

            ~ Scott Safier,  March 10, 2004