Taking Ownership of System Files under Windows 10


Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

This deserves a separate topic so that anyone who might need to do this for other reasons in the future would turn up this information in a search.   It is in direct response to Josh Kennedy's query in the topic:  making oneCore voices read more like eloquence.  As a result, it focuses on the OneCore TTS INI files one might need to take ownership of.   The principles apply generally, though.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Taking Ownership of System Files

Before getting into the nitty-gritty, a few words of caution:

1.        You must be logged in to Windows 10 with an account that has Administrator privileges.  If you are not, you cannot alter system file permissions.

2.       One must exercise a great deal of caution when doing this.   You will generally not ever want to take away permissions from TrustedInstaller, for example, only add permissions for the Administrators group or your own User Account.  I tend to add it for Administrators.

3.       Always make a backup copy of the file you intend to alter before you alter it.  That way if something you do has catastrophic results, and you aren’t certain which change triggered those, you have an instant “restore option” available.

 

The focus here will be the INI files for Windows 10 One Core Voices.   These are all located in the folder, C:\Windows\Speech_OneCore\TTS.   There will be one or more subfolders under the noted folder depending on the languages for which you have installed OneCore voices.  Navigate to the appropriate folder for the voice whose INI file you wish to tweak.

1.        Select that INI file.

2.       Open the Context Menu for the file and choose Properties.

3.       Navigate to the Security tab in Properties.

4.      Activate the Advanced button.   Note:  All actions will be taking place in the dialog that comes up after the Advanced button is activated.  These changes will also not be reflected when you navigate back to the Security tab, as it was populated before you made the changes.  If you bring it up again they will be there.

5.       The default owner for these INI files is TrustedInstaller, so the first thing you must do is to change ownership.  Navigate to the Change link and activate it.

6.      You will now be in the Select User or Group dialog, in the Enter Object Name to Select edit box.  Type Administrators in this box, then navigate to the Check Names button and activate it.  Once you do you will be thrown back into the edit box and it should contain your machine name followed by a backslash followed by Administrators.

7.       Navigate to the OK button and activate it.  The ownership of the file has now been transferred to the Adminstrators group (but TrustedInstaller still has full access).

8.      You are now back in the Advanced Security Settings dialog, and you first need to OK your way out, back to the Properties dialog, then activate the Advanced button again.  Trust me, it will not work if you don’t exit and re-enter the Advanced Properties dialog.

9.       You will now navigate to the Administrators item in the Permissions tab and select it.

10.    Next navigate to the Change Permissions button and activate it.

11.     Now, strangely enough, you will be presented with what appears to be the exact same Advanced Properties dialog, but it isn’t.  In this one, navigate again to the Administrators entry in the Permissions tab and select it.  Then navigate to the Edit button and activate it.

12.     You are now in the Permission Entry dialog for the INI file and the permissions being set are for the Administrators group, which now has ownership of the file.  Navigate to the Full Control checkbox, check it, then navigate to the OK button and activate it.

13.     You are now back in the Advanced Security dialog.  Activate the OK button there.  This will immediately trigger a warning dialog telling you that you are about to change permissions on system folders and asking if you want to continue.  You will activate the Yes button.  This will close the Advanced Security Dialog, but the original Properties dialog is still up, and you will probably not land in it.  If you don’t, then use ALT+TAB until you have regained focus on that dialog, then navigate to the OK button and activate it.

Now the file is owned by anyone who has an account that’s part of the Administrators group on this computer, and can be opened for editing by you or them for editing using Notepad.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1903, Build 18362
The purpose of education is not to validate ignorance but to overcome it.
       ~ Lawrence Krauss


Kevin
 

Stuff!I wish there was an easier way to do this without all this advanced

 

E-mail is golden!!!
Kevin Lee

 

From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Monday, July 22, 2019 8:47 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: [win10] Taking Ownership of System Files under Windows 10

 

This deserves a separate topic so that anyone who might need to do this for other reasons in the future would turn up this information in a search.   It is in direct response to Josh Kennedy's query in the topic:  making oneCore voices read more like eloquence.  As a result, it focuses on the OneCore TTS INI files one might need to take ownership of.   The principles apply generally, though.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Taking Ownership of System Files

Before getting into the nitty-gritty, a few words of caution:

1.        You must be logged in to Windows 10 with an account that has Administrator privileges.  If you are not, you cannot alter system file permissions.

2.       One must exercise a great deal of caution when doing this.   You will generally not ever want to take away permissions from TrustedInstaller, for example, only add permissions for the Administrators group or your own User Account.  I tend to add it for Administrators.

3.       Always make a backup copy of the file you intend to alter before you alter it.  That way if something you do has catastrophic results, and you aren’t certain which change triggered those, you have an instant “restore option” available.

 

The focus here will be the INI files for Windows 10 One Core Voices.   These are all located in the folder, C:\Windows\Speech_OneCore\TTS.   There will be one or more subfolders under the noted folder depending on the languages for which you have installed OneCore voices.  Navigate to the appropriate folder for the voice whose INI file you wish to tweak.

1.        Select that INI file.

2.       Open the Context Menu for the file and choose Properties.

3.       Navigate to the Security tab in Properties.

4.      Activate the Advanced button.   Note:  All actions will be taking place in the dialog that comes up after the Advanced button is activated.  These changes will also not be reflected when you navigate back to the Security tab, as it was populated before you made the changes.  If you bring it up again they will be there.

5.       The default owner for these INI files is TrustedInstaller, so the first thing you must do is to change ownership.  Navigate to the Change link and activate it.

6.      You will now be in the Select User or Group dialog, in the Enter Object Name to Select edit box.  Type Administrators in this box, then navigate to the Check Names button and activate it.  Once you do you will be thrown back into the edit box and it should contain your machine name followed by a backslash followed by Administrators.

7.       Navigate to the OK button and activate it.  The ownership of the file has now been transferred to the Adminstrators group (but TrustedInstaller still has full access).

8.      You are now back in the Advanced Security Settings dialog, and you first need to OK your way out, back to the Properties dialog, then activate the Advanced button again.  Trust me, it will not work if you don’t exit and re-enter the Advanced Properties dialog.

9.       You will now navigate to the Administrators item in the Permissions tab and select it.

10.    Next navigate to the Change Permissions button and activate it.

11.     Now, strangely enough, you will be presented with what appears to be the exact same Advanced Properties dialog, but it isn’t.  In this one, navigate again to the Administrators entry in the Permissions tab and select it.  Then navigate to the Edit button and activate it.

12.     You are now in the Permission Entry dialog for the INI file and the permissions being set are for the Administrators group, which now has ownership of the file.  Navigate to the Full Control checkbox, check it, then navigate to the OK button and activate it.

13.     You are now back in the Advanced Security dialog.  Activate the OK button there.  This will immediately trigger a warning dialog telling you that you are about to change permissions on system folders and asking if you want to continue.  You will activate the Yes button.  This will close the Advanced Security Dialog, but the original Properties dialog is still up, and you will probably not land in it.  If you don’t, then use ALT+TAB until you have regained focus on that dialog, then navigate to the OK button and activate it.

Now the file is owned by anyone who has an account that’s part of the Administrators group on this computer, and can be opened for editing by you or them for editing using Notepad.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1903, Build 18362
The purpose of education is not to validate ignorance but to overcome it.
       ~ Lawrence Krauss

 


Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

On Mon, Jul 22, 2019 at 09:08 PM, Kevin wrote:
Stuff!I wish there was an easier way to do this without all this advanced
One should not really be doing this at all.  There are exceptional circumstances, this experiment with the OneCore voice INI files being an example, but generally not.

The bulk of users, including most readers here, should never do this sort of tweaking without very carefully considering the possible fallout.   For OneCore voices any failure would probably be limited to the voice which had its specific INI tweaked.   In other circumstances and folders its entirely possible to render one's system unbootable if the wrong thing is messed with.

This is advanced because it should be.   This is "proceed with extreme caution" territory.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1903, Build 18362
The purpose of education is not to validate ignorance but to overcome it.
       ~ Lawrence Krauss


Josh Kennedy <joshknnd1982@...>
 

that is why there should be a way to change these ini file settings in a section of the settings app in windows 10 I think. 


Josh Kennedy <joshknnd1982@...>
 

also, I sent feedback to Microsoft about 1. Microsoft should have their own version of Espeak called microsoft-espeak. 2. ability for microsoft-espeak to work both as sapi5 and with windows 10 narrator. 3. Improved klatt-based-voices. 4. access to all voices and espeak languages as microsoft sees fit. 5. notepad-type-app in the microsoft app store with built-in-espeak, with the ability to use phonemes and commands to program it to sing songs, like you could with the old decTalk. 
Josh


Loy <loyrg2845@...>
 


I have used a free utility call " take ownership" for taking ownership of some system files  when I did a hack to enable Win Mail on Windows 10. You might Google for this and see if that would do what you need.
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, July 23, 2019 10:18 AM
Subject: Re: [win10] Taking Ownership of System Files under Windows 10

that is why there should be a way to change these ini file settings in a section of the settings app in windows 10 I think. 


Sarah k Alawami
 

Uh, I'll upvote everything except 2, 3, 4, and 5. 5, we really don't as the end user needs. A screen readr should be used to read the screen and not for singing. that to me is so 2005, fun as it was to listen to. Anyway can you provide the link to the feedback so we can leave our comments on it?

Sarah Alawami, owner of TFFP. . For more info go to our website. This is also our libsyn page as well.
For stuff we sell, mac training materials and  tutorials go here.
and for hosting options go here
to subscribe to the feed click here

Our telegram channel is also a good place for an announce only in regard to podcasts, contests, etc.

Finally, to become a patron and help support the podcast go here

On 23 Jul 2019, at 7:21, Josh Kennedy wrote:

also, I sent feedback to Microsoft about 1. Microsoft should have their own version of Espeak called microsoft-espeak. 2. ability for microsoft-espeak to work both as sapi5 and with windows 10 narrator. 3. Improved klatt-based-voices. 4. access to all voices and espeak languages as microsoft sees fit. 5. notepad-type-app in the microsoft app store with built-in-espeak, with the ability to use phonemes and commands to program it to sing songs, like you could with the old decTalk. 
Josh


JM Casey
 

I don’t think they’ll do this because those files are designed to be heavily protected form “interference”. The best way to make a change is to go to an individual file and adjust its properties. This is not that hard to do, but the steps are kind of weird and the audio feedback  when checking and unchecking boxes in the security properties for each file isn’t quite what you’d expect.

If I have some time I’ll try experimenting with this again.

However you should know that, whenever there’s a major Windows update, those ini files will probably get replaced, and you’ll be back to square one again.

 

 

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Josh Kennedy
Sent: July 23, 2019 10:18 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Taking Ownership of System Files under Windows 10

 

that is why there should be a way to change these ini file settings in a section of the settings app in windows 10 I think. 


 

Loy and all,
Loy wrote:
I have used a free utility call " take ownership" for taking ownership of some system files  when I did a hack to enable Win Mail on Windows 10. You might Google for this and see if that would do what you need.
I've downloaded this program, but never used it. It has lots of good comments so if someone wants to give it a try, check it here.

Cheers,
Loy and Marcio AKA Starboy

Sent from a galaxy far, far away.

--
Are you a Thunderbird user? Then join the Thunderbird mailing list to help and be helped with all Thunderbird things - questions, features, add-ons and much more!


Bill White <billwhite92701@...>
 

Hi, Marcio. When I downloaded TakeOwnership.zip, it says it’s for Win 7 and 8. Are you sure it works for Windows 10?

 

Thank you.

 

Bill White

billwhite92701@...

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io [mailto:win10@win10.groups.io] On Behalf Of Marcio via Groups.Io
Sent: Tuesday, July 23, 2019 6:49 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Taking Ownership of System Files under Windows 10

 

Loy and all,

Loy wrote:

I have used a free utility call " take ownership" for taking ownership of some system files  when I did a hack to enable Win Mail on Windows 10. You might Google for this and see if that would do what you need.

I've downloaded this program, but never used it. It has lots of good comments so if someone wants to give it a try, check it here.

Cheers,
Loy and Marcio

AKA Starboy

 

Sent from a galaxy far, far away.

--
Are you a Thunderbird user? Then join the Thunderbird mailing list to help and be helped with all Thunderbird things - questions, features, add-ons and much more!


Bill White <billwhite92701@...>
 

Also, Marcio. When I downloaded TakeOwnership.exe.zip, there are two executable files inside. If this program works for Windows 10, which one do I use?

 

TakeOwnershipEx-1.2.0.1.exe

or

TakeOwnershipEx-1.2.0.1-Win8.exe

 

Bill White

billwhite92701@...

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io [mailto:win10@win10.groups.io] On Behalf Of Marcio via Groups.Io
Sent: Tuesday, July 23, 2019 6:49 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Taking Ownership of System Files under Windows 10

 

Loy and all,

Loy wrote:

I have used a free utility call " take ownership" for taking ownership of some system files  when I did a hack to enable Win Mail on Windows 10. You might Google for this and see if that would do what you need.

I've downloaded this program, but never used it. It has lots of good comments so if someone wants to give it a try, check it here.

Cheers,
Loy and Marcio

AKA Starboy

 

Sent from a galaxy far, far away.

--
Are you a Thunderbird user? Then join the Thunderbird mailing list to help and be helped with all Thunderbird things - questions, features, add-ons and much more!


 

Bill,
Are you sure it works for Windows 10?
Really  not sure but it should work since they keep advertising it on articles  related to Win 10. Anyway it won't damage your machine, the worst that can happen is that it won't work :)

there are two executable files inside. If this program works for Windows 10, which one do I use?
Good question. When I downloaded it, there was only one file. Maybe I downloaded another program? Let me see it.

Yikes, my bad! Wrong link.
This is the article from where I downloaded what works with Windows 10. Check it here.

Let me know if it works for you?

Cheers,
Marcio AKA Starboy

Sent from a galaxy far, far away.

--
Are you a Thunderbird user? Then join the Thunderbird mailing list to help and be helped with all Thunderbird things - questions, features, add-ons and much more!


Jaffar Sidek <jaffar.sidek10@...>
 

Yup it does.

On 7/24/2019 9:59 AM, Bill White wrote:

Hi, Marcio. When I downloaded TakeOwnership.zip, it says it’s for Win 7 and 8. Are you sure it works for Windows 10?

 

Thank you.

 

Bill White

billwhite92701@...

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io [mailto:win10@win10.groups.io] On Behalf Of Marcio via Groups.Io
Sent: Tuesday, July 23, 2019 6:49 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Taking Ownership of System Files under Windows 10

 

Loy and all,

Loy wrote:

I have used a free utility call " take ownership" for taking ownership of some system files  when I did a hack to enable Win Mail on Windows 10. You might Google for this and see if that would do what you need.

I've downloaded this program, but never used it. It has lots of good comments so if someone wants to give it a try, check it here.

Cheers,
Loy and Marcio

AKA Starboy

 

Sent from a galaxy far, far away.

--
Are you a Thunderbird user? Then join the Thunderbird mailing list to help and be helped with all Thunderbird things - questions, features, add-ons and much more!


Bill White <billwhite92701@...>
 

Maybe it does, Jaffar, but I’m glad I wrote back to Marcio, because, in his very next post, he let me know that he had given the wrong link, and gave the one he had actually intended to send. The one he sent in that post, I know works with Windows 10.

 

Bill White

billwhite92701@...

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io [mailto:win10@win10.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jaffar Sidek
Sent: Tuesday, July 23, 2019 8:01 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Taking Ownership of System Files under Windows 10

 

Yup it does.

On 7/24/2019 9:59 AM, Bill White wrote:

Hi, Marcio. When I downloaded TakeOwnership.zip, it says it’s for Win 7 and 8. Are you sure it works for Windows 10?

 

Thank you.

 

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io [mailto:win10@win10.groups.io] On Behalf Of Marcio via Groups.Io
Sent: Tuesday, July 23, 2019 6:49 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Taking Ownership of System Files under Windows 10

 

Loy and all,

Loy wrote:

I have used a free utility call " take ownership" for taking ownership of some system files  when I did a hack to enable Win Mail on Windows 10. You might Google for this and see if that would do what you need.

I've downloaded this program, but never used it. It has lots of good comments so if someone wants to give it a try, check it here.

Cheers,
Loy and Marcio

AKA Starboy

 

Sent from a galaxy far, far away.

--
Are you a Thunderbird user? Then join the Thunderbird mailing list to help and be helped with all Thunderbird things - questions, features, add-ons and much more!


Kevin Cussick
 

thanks, I think the winero program does this anyway but thanks for the link.

On 24/07/2019 02:48, Marcio via Groups.I wrote:
Loy and all,
Loy wrote:
I have used a free utility call " take ownership" for taking ownership of some system files  when I did a hack to enable Win Mail on Windows 10. You might Google for this and see if that would do what you need.
I've downloaded this program, but never used it. It has lots of good comments so if someone wants to give it a try, check it here <https://winaero.com/download.php?view.16>.
Cheers,
Loy and Marcio <https://tinyurl.com/TlkTM> AKA /Starboy/
Sent from a galaxy far, far away.
--
Are you a Thunderbird user? Then join the Thunderbird mailing list <https://groups.io/g/thunderbird/> to help and be helped with all Thunderbird things - questions, features, add-ons and much more!