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browser Only IE displays this correctly...


Randy <blindmansbluff09@...>
 

So, I noticed that of the 4 browsers: Chrome, Edge, Firefox and Internet Explorer the only one that displays the name of some links on this page isIE. also while doing this I noticed that the text of the article only shows up if you copy and paste the webpage into a text editor.  Can you all check and see if it is just me?

So go to: https://go.technologyreview.com/e2t/c/*W96f7HW95_mFNW5FD9Zt7vKP1-0/*W5bJPvf2bJFvjW46zn-Q7PymF40/5/f18dQhb0S1V22RMFdXV1Kg4H2KwCs8W1lYb8D5VRH1TW7VjwDl4VJt4lW2LgFTL1cp_q-W3JLpY15MJ35nW7ZlDm-8XJGNqW1l4tpr5PcvFtVVhRmY4q5YfcN5PcB7tyS268W190Qgg6ZCSHYVqzvzY1LVlh1W2MFKpG4ldPqVW5cXFrj4_tZ3pW14PswX6CtZ06W6M5ffT2StlWpW3SmPyM6bvYFMW301jxM1HJzC_W4l7g3M1t-3R4W4KSmcQ2K41DWN7kXMk62jkHKW24Ps1g795JF-VybWDX2r5_LrW3qRZJK19lRR2W49jfnY53VB10N5GFkkykVkbjVX4YfL83pWT5MK0_mYdTknTW1Ms7Cp2bYqt1W38z1bt6nbNb7W2WzwBK3sRc2tW1kfx3N67cWmTVYDCwj77rsQMVxdP7L3y1kKVW3VyRfH6pZX6FW5fHmrJ2hhKytW78Tcjn8ZxZ-HW8f1Xcs2zhpGlW320Bx41WwtW_W69nFBG67sV_YW3kMwd31KfDRtW1Xs5WW3B5YFlW4NbzC424j-LfW8w0Pz76fQ-X2W688bQD4hNHJrW8knjQx2k_jz2N25zjN1szbP8W8DhK7n866fhyW8rcTDK5tFrgcW2NsMPY3ptyNYW8X5z6V8Qhz29W5wXGKH8ph4XxW4zBM-h29hc8HW1Nymz49cgW_cf4V2grh02

speech history for IE: Hmm... Speech history is blank. So I will cut and paste it.

When in the webpage from the link above, scroll down until you hear the text below.
 the bullets will be the actual name for the links in IE but other browsers will just say link.
Example of webpage text.
Image credit:
  • zhuyufang/Getty

Posted by Karen Hao


You may notice that the text for the article is nowhere to be found on the page in any of the browsers but when I copied the text above for this example this is what was pasted:

Is China’s social credit system as Orwellian as it sounds?

In the Western imagination, China’s infamous social credit system is an AI-powered surveillance regime that violates human rights. We often hear about examples of its use for asserting political control, such as last month, when a man was stripped of 950 out of 1,000 points—having been docked 10 points every time he petitioned the government for help with his mother’s medical dispute. But rarely do we hear about the other narrative, in which it is a governance mechanism welcomed by many citizens who are fed up with rampant fraud, counterfeit products, and public health failures.

This is the not-so-straightforward reality portrayed by a story from the South China Morning Post. (Though, to be fair, there are questions about just how independent the SCMP is.) In the village of Jiakuang Majia within Rongcheng city, one of a dozen places lauded for its success in piloting the program, residents say the scheme has mostly been a positive influence—if an influence at all. There is actually no AI or other technology involved. Rather, points are tracked with paper and manual labor—and many consider the system a peripheral bureaucracy, far from a driving force in their day-to-day lives.

China’s social credit system is designed to incentivize lawfulness and integrity. Citizens can earn points for good deeds like volunteering, donating blood, or attracting investments to the city; they can lose them for offenses like breaking traffic rules, evading taxes, or neglecting to care for their elderly parents. Their scores then affect their access to community welfare programs: high scorers receive benefits like free medical checkups and discounts to heating bills; low scorers lose government subsidies or get barred from government jobs.

But while this last detail is often characterized in the West as a freedom-infringing power grab by an authoritarian government, many scholars argue that social credit scores won’t have the wide-scale controlling effect presumed. The data the scheme collects does’t actually align with the data that, say, a bank needs to determine whether to grant you a loan. Regulations have also been revised in instances of intense pushback: Suining County got rid of its point deductions for unauthorized petitions, for example, because of widespread unpopularity. Therefore, these scholars say, the system acts more as a tool of propaganda than a tool of enforcement. Others point out that it is simply an extension of Chinese culture’s long tradition of promoting good moral behavior and that Chinese citizens have a completely different perspective on privacy and freedom.

This story originally appeared in our AI newsletter The Algorithm. To have it directly delivered to your inbox, sign up here for free.

Image credit:
  • zhuyufang/Getty


 

Hi,

 

You are correct there are 6 links which Chrome reads only as link and Internet Explorer correctly identifies them as follows:

list of 6 items

Link Facebook

Link Twitter

Link Reddit

Link LinkedIn

Link WhatsApp

Link Email

on mouse over

list end

 

I am on th eJaws private beta program and submit this as a bug so FS can take a look at it and hopefully fix this since I have come across this on other websites where in Chrome Jaws would announce such sharing links simply as "Link".

however, otherwise this website is much easier to navigate and read in Chrome. First of all, if you ask Jaws to give you a summary of what's on this page with Jaws Key + F1 when you are at the top of the page, the following is reported:

 

In Chrone Jaws gives the following information:

This page contains 46 links.

there are 4 regions.

there are 6 headings.

1 at level 1,

4 at level 2,

1 at level 3,

There are 6 forms.

 

In Internet Explorer you get this:

This page contains 15 links.

there are 6 headings.

1 at level 1,

4 at level 2,

1 at level 3,

There are 3 forms.

 

Jaws reports 46 links on that page in Chrome but only 15 links in Internet Explorer.

The 4 regions reported in Chrome are omitted in IE and in IE only 3 form fields are reported whereas Jaws identifies 6 in Chrome.

 

I also found that in Chrome there is a button "Close Mobile" which is not being identified in IE and when I activated this, Jaws now gave me this:

This page contains 319 links.

there are 2 regions.

there are 49 headings.

1 at level 1,

41 at level 2,

7 at level 3,

There are 9 forms.

There is 1 frame.

 

After activating this "Close Mobile" button Jaws shows tons of articles with the first few lines of text and A "Read more" link which once activated let's you read the entire article. For the article you specified it looks like this (directly copied from Chrome):

 

article

tPeople walk on the busy streets of Shanghai

Is China’s social credit system as Orwellian as it sounds?

In the Western imagination, China’s infamous social credit system is an AI-powered surveillance regime that violates human rights. We often hear about examples of its use for asserting political control, such as last month, when a man was stripped of…

Read more

 

IMAGE CREDIT:

list of 1 items

ZHUYUFANG/GETTY

list end

list of 6 items

list end

 

You can see that the 6 social media links just above which read as just "Link" after copying and pasting into Notepad just produce silence. If I use Jaws Speech History to copy this same area, i tsounds like this:

 

article

Graphic People walk on the busy streets of Shanghai

heading level 2 Is China’s social credit system as Orwellian as it sounds?

In the Western imagination, China’s infamous social credit system is an AI-powered surveillance regime that violates human rights. We often hear about examples of its use for asserting political control, such as last month, when a man was stripped of…

Link Read more

IMAGE CREDIT:

list of 1 items

ZHUYUFANG/GETTY

list end

list of 6 items

Link 

Link 

Link 

Link 

Link 

Link 

list end

article end

 

As you can see here Jaws includes the information it speaks such as that the headline of the article is a headling level 2, that the "read more" is a link etc.

 

One thing I found is that after you press "Read more" you do have to find the beginning of the article, it is still a heading level 2, but it appears underneat all the other dozens of article sand I found the quickest way to find it is to copy part of the headline, paste it into Jaws Virtual Find and then you can get straight to where the newly expanded article starts, it reads as follows, again I copy directly from Chrome and not speech history:

 

Is China’s social credit system as Orwellian as it sounds?

 

In the Western imagination, China’s infamous social credit system is an AI-powered surveillance regime that violates human rights. We often hear about examples of its use for asserting political control, such as last month, when a man was stripped of 950 out of 1,000 points—having been docked 10 points every time he petitioned the government for help with his mother’s medical dispute. But rarely do we hear about the other narrative, in which it is a governance mechanism welcomed by many citizens who are fed up with rampant fraud, counterfeit products, and public health failures.

This is the not-so-straightforward reality portrayed by a story from the South China Morning Post. (Though, to be fair, there are questions about just how independent the SCMP is.)

In the village of Jiakuang Majia within Rongcheng city, one of a dozen places lauded for its success in piloting the program, residents say the scheme has mostly been a positive influence—if an influence at all. There is actually no AI or other technology involved. Rather, points are tracked with paper and manual labor—and many consider the system a peripheral bureaucracy, far from a driving force in their day-to-day lives.

China’s social credit system is designed to incentivize lawfulness and integrity. Citizens can earn points for good deeds like volunteering, donating blood, or attracting investments to the city; they can lose them for offenses like breaking traffic rules, evading taxes, or neglecting to care for their elderly parents. Their scores then affect their access to community welfare programs: high scorers receive benefits like free medical checkups and discounts to heating bills; low scorers lose government subsidies or get barred from government jobs.

But while this last detail is often characterized in the West as a freedom-infringing power grab by an authoritarian government, many scholars argue that social credit scores won’t have the wide-scale controlling effect presumed. The data the scheme collects doesn’t actually align with the data that, say, a bank needs to determine whether to grant you a loan. Regulations have also been revised in instances of intense pushback: Suining County got rid of its point deductions for unauthorized petitions, for example, because of widespread unpopularity.

Therefore, these scholars say, the system acts more as a tool of propaganda than a tool of enforcement. Others point out that it is simply an extension of Chinese culture’s long tradition of promoting good moral behavior and that Chinese citizens have a completely different perspective on privacy and freedom.

This story originally appeared in our AI newsletter The Algorithm. To have it directly delivered to your inbox, sign up here for free.

And just as a comment from me, tjhis "sign up here for free" is a link you can click.

Also, just above the start of the article is that "Close Mobile" button again, here is Jaws speech history, I do a say line when I am on the heading 2 which is the headline and then I arrow up a couple of times:

 

heading level 2 Is China’s social credit system as Orwellian as it sounds?

 

Graphic People walk on the busy streets of Shanghai

Close modalButton

 

Regards,

Sieghard

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Randy
Sent: Saturday, March 2, 2019 10:13 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: [win10] browser Only IE displays this correctly...

 

So, I noticed that of the 4 browsers: Chrome, Edge, Firefox and Internet Explorer the only one that displays the name of some links on this page isIE. also while doing this I noticed that the text of the article only shows up if you copy and paste the webpage into a text editor.  Can you all check and see if it is just me?

So go to: https://go.technologyreview.com/e2t/c/*W96f7HW95_mFNW5FD9Zt7vKP1-0/*W5bJPvf2bJFvjW46zn-Q7PymF40/5/f18dQhb0S1V22RMFdXV1Kg4H2KwCs8W1lYb8D5VRH1TW7VjwDl4VJt4lW2LgFTL1cp_q-W3JLpY15MJ35nW7ZlDm-8XJGNqW1l4tpr5PcvFtVVhRmY4q5YfcN5PcB7tyS268W190Qgg6ZCSHYVqzvzY1LVlh1W2MFKpG4ldPqVW5cXFrj4_tZ3pW14PswX6CtZ06W6M5ffT2StlWpW3SmPyM6bvYFMW301jxM1HJzC_W4l7g3M1t-3R4W4KSmcQ2K41DWN7kXMk62jkHKW24Ps1g795JF-VybWDX2r5_LrW3qRZJK19lRR2W49jfnY53VB10N5GFkkykVkbjVX4YfL83pWT5MK0_mYdTknTW1Ms7Cp2bYqt1W38z1bt6nbNb7W2WzwBK3sRc2tW1kfx3N67cWmTVYDCwj77rsQMVxdP7L3y1kKVW3VyRfH6pZX6FW5fHmrJ2hhKytW78Tcjn8ZxZ-HW8f1Xcs2zhpGlW320Bx41WwtW_W69nFBG67sV_YW3kMwd31KfDRtW1Xs5WW3B5YFlW4NbzC424j-LfW8w0Pz76fQ-X2W688bQD4hNHJrW8knjQx2k_jz2N25zjN1szbP8W8DhK7n866fhyW8rcTDK5tFrgcW2NsMPY3ptyNYW8X5z6V8Qhz29W5wXGKH8ph4XxW4zBM-h29hc8HW1Nymz49cgW_cf4V2grh02

speech history for IE: Hmm... Speech history is blank. So I will cut and paste it.

When in the webpage from the link above, scroll down until you hear the text below.
 the bullets will be the actual name for the links in IE but other browsers will just say link.

Example of webpage text.
Image credit:

  • zhuyufang/Getty
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Posted by Karen Hao



You may notice that the text for the article is nowhere to be found on the page in any of the browsers but when I copied the text above for this example this is what was pasted:

Is China’s social credit system as Orwellian as it sounds?

In the Western imagination, China’s infamous social credit system is an AI-powered surveillance regime that violates human rights. We often hear about examples of its use for asserting political control, such as last month, when a man was stripped of 950 out of 1,000 points—having been docked 10 points every time he petitioned the government for help with his mother’s medical dispute. But rarely do we hear about the other narrative, in which it is a governance mechanism welcomed by many citizens who are fed up with rampant fraud, counterfeit products, and public health failures.

This is the not-so-straightforward reality portrayed by a story from the South China Morning Post. (Though, to be fair, there are questions about just how independent the SCMP is.) In the village of Jiakuang Majia within Rongcheng city, one of a dozen places lauded for its success in piloting the program, residents say the scheme has mostly been a positive influence—if an influence at all. There is actually no AI or other technology involved. Rather, points are tracked with paper and manual labor—and many consider the system a peripheral bureaucracy, far from a driving force in their day-to-day lives.

China’s social credit system is designed to incentivize lawfulness and integrity. Citizens can earn points for good deeds like volunteering, donating blood, or attracting investments to the city; they can lose them for offenses like breaking traffic rules, evading taxes, or neglecting to care for their elderly parents. Their scores then affect their access to community welfare programs: high scorers receive benefits like free medical checkups and discounts to heating bills; low scorers lose government subsidies or get barred from government jobs.

But while this last detail is often characterized in the West as a freedom-infringing power grab by an authoritarian government, many scholars argue that social credit scores won’t have the wide-scale controlling effect presumed. The data the scheme collects does’t actually align with the data that, say, a bank needs to determine whether to grant you a loan. Regulations have also been revised in instances of intense pushback: Suining County got rid of its point deductions for unauthorized petitions, for example, because of widespread unpopularity. Therefore, these scholars say, the system acts more as a tool of propaganda than a tool of enforcement. Others point out that it is simply an extension of Chinese culture’s long tradition of promoting good moral behavior and that Chinese citizens have a completely different perspective on privacy and freedom.

This story originally appeared in our AI newsletter The Algorithm. To have it directly delivered to your inbox, sign up here for free.

Image credit:

  • zhuyufang/Getty