Date   

Re: touch interaction

Mike B
 


Hi Don,
 
Here you go:
How to access + the full Touch Screen help book.
Press, Insert + J, to open the Jaws context menu.
Press the letter, H, to open Help or up or down arrow to Help and press enter.
Press the letter, J, to open Jaws Help Topics, or up or down arrow to Jaws Help Topics and press enter.
The keystroke sequence is, Insert + J, then press, H, then press, J.
 
Down arrow to, Using JAWS book closed, and right arrow to open.
 
Down arrow to, topic Using JAWS with a Touch Screen, press enter to select, and press, F6, to read.
To go back to the books and topics list press the, F6 key.
 

Using JAWS with a Touch Screen
If you have a computer running Windows 8 or later that includes a touch screen, such as the Surface™ Pro tablet from Microsoft, you can control JAWS directly from the touch screen. To use a touch screen, you will use one or more fingers to perform various gestures right on the surface of the device's screen to control JAWS and the tablet. To take full advantage of this feature, you need a touch screen that offers five or more touch points. This topic describes how you can use a touch screen to control JAWS.
 
Gestures
 
Exploring the Screen
 
Touch Modes
 
Using the Windows Touch Keyboard
 
JAWS Specific Touch Gestures
 
Gestures
Performing JAWS and Windows commands from a touch screen is accomplished by different touch gestures using one or more fingers. Gestures include taps, flicks, swipes, rotating, and pinching. The following sections describe these gestures.
 
Taps
Tap the screen quickly with one or more fingers. Tapping with one finger is called a tap, using 2 fingers is a 2-finger tap, and so on.
 
Tapping more than once quickly performs a multi-tap gesture. Tapping twice is a double tap, and three times is a triple tap. Placing and holding one finger on the screen while simultaneously tapping with a second finger is called a split tap. You can also use more than one finger in multi-tap gestures. For example, you can do a 2-finger double tap or three-finger triple tap.
 
Flicks and Swipes
Flicking and swiping are the primary navigation gestures and are used constantly. To flick, move one or more fingers very quickly across the screen in the direction of the flick. You can flick up, down, left, or right. For example, flick up, or two-finger flick right.
 
A swipe is very similar to a flick except that you drag one or more fingers in a slower motion across the screen in a particular direction. You can swipe up, down, left, or right. For example, two-finger swipe up, or three-finger swipe right. You can also swipe in one direction and then quickly swipe in a different direction. For instance, two-finger swipe up-down, or three-finger swipe right-up.
 
Rotate
Place two or more fingers on the screen and then turn them in a circular motion either clockwise or counterclockwise as if you were turning a dial.
 
Pinch
To pinch in, place your thumb and index finger on the screen and pinch them together. To pinch out, place your thumb and index finger together on the screen and then spread them apart.
 
Exploring the Screen
When you place a finger on the screen, JAWS will announce the element under your finger. You can then move your finger around the screen and JAWS will announce each element you encounter. As you explore, you can perform a split tap or a split double tap to have JAWS announce the character or word at the location of your finger. Elements can be anything from buttons, links, and lists of items, to edit fields, headings, and regions. This is a good way to explore and find out what items are available and where they are located.
 
When you lift your finger and then tap the screen once, the current element at that point is spoken. If you perform a double tap at that current point, the current element is activated. Once you become familliar with the location of various elements, you can tap the part of the screen containing the particular element instead of having to explore to locate it. For example, in the Windows Mail app, the Preview pane where the message body is displayed for the user, is positioned on the right side of the screen. So if you have moved through the inbox, and then want to move your focus to the message you are on, tapping on the right side of the screen will quickly get you to the message.
 
Touch Modes
The two-finger rotate gesture allows you to cycle between three gesture modes; Touch Navigation, Text Reading, and Speech Settings. Certain touch gestures will work differently depending on which mode is active. The following sections describe each mode.
 
Touch Navigation
In Touch Navigation mode, which is always the default mode, gestures move you to various elements on the screen.
 
To move to the next or previous element, flick right or flick left.
 
To move by a specific element type, flick down or flick up. To change what element type these gestures move by, perform a two-finger flick left or right to cycle through the available types using the navigation rotor.
 
For example, if you want the flick down and flick up gestures to move by headings, flick left or right with two fingers until you hear "headings. Now, flicking down or up will move to the next or previous heading.
 
Double tapping on the current element will move focus to that element and perform the appropriate action. For instance, opening a menu, selecting a check box, or activating a button or link. To move focus to an element without activating it, perform a three-finger flick right or three-finger flick left.
 
To have JAWS read all elements on the screen, perform a two-finger flick down.
 
Text Reading
Text Reading mode allows you to use gestures to navigate through text as well as select and edit content. In addition to using the two-finger rotate gesture, Text Reading mode will also automatically be activated when you double tap on a text element that supports cursor navigation, such as an article in the News app, or the text area of an editing application like Microsoft Word. When Text Reading is activated using a double tap on a text element, for instance, the second paragraph of a document, JAWS attempts to position the cursor at the location of the double tap.
 
Note: Positioning the cursor may not work in all applications due to the level of UIA support provided by the specific application.
 
If you explore away from the text element to another item that does not support text reading, JAWS will automatically switch back to Touch Navigation.
 
To move to the next or prior character, perform a flick right or flick left. This is the same as pressing LEFT or RIGHT ARROW.
 
To move to the next or prior word, perform a two-finger flick right or two-finger flick left. This is the same as pressing CTRL+LEFT or CTRL+RIGHT ARROW.
 
To move to the next or prior line, perform a flick down or flick up. This is the same as pressing DOWN or UP ARROW.
 
To move to the next or prior paragraph, perform a two-finger flick down or two-finger flick up. This is the same as pressing CTRL+DOWN or CTRL+UP ARROW.
 
To move to the next or previous page or screen, depending on the application, perform a four-finger flick down or up. This is the same as pressing PAGE DOWN or PAGE UP.
 
To move to the beginning or end of the current line, perform a three-finger flick left or right. This is the same as pressing HOME or END.
 
To move to the top or bottom of the text, perform a three-finger flick up or down. This is the same as pressing CTRL+HOME or CTRL+END.
 
To begin a Say All, perform a four-finger swipe down. This is similar to pressing INSERT+DOWN ARROW and begins reading from the current location in the document. Tapping once anywhere on the screen stops reading as if you pressed the CTRL key.
 
Performing a triple tap toggles text selection on or off. When selection is enabled, using any of the above text reading gestures will select the specific unit as well as move to it. For example, to move to and select the next line, perform a triple tap and then flick down. Text will continue being selected as you navigate until you perform a triple tap again to turn it off. Perform a two-finger triple tap to have JAWS read the selected text.
 
Speech Settings
Speech Settings mode gives you a quick way to change commonly used settings that might normally require several steps to access. Currently, you can adjust the speech rate and change the main system volume.
 
To increase or decrease the speech rate, perform a flick right or flick left.
 
To increase or decrease the main volume, perform a flick up or flick down.
 
Text Review
When you encounter an element that does not support standard cursor navigation, such as a button, or an item in a list, performing a three-finger swipe down then up opens a Virtual Viewer window containing the name of the element. You can then use the navigation gestures described above to review this information. This is useful if you want to review a control in greater detail that you did not quite understand when it was announced by JAWS during exploration or when tapping it. Performing the three-finger swipe down then up gesture again will close the Virtual Viewer.
 
When this mode is active, you will not be able to navigate to other items on the screen. If you explore outside of the Virtual Viewer, JAWS plays a sound to indicate you are no longer in the window.
 
Note: The three-finger swipe down then up gesture will not activate Text Review if it is used on a text element that supports standard cursor navigation, or if the element does not have a name, such as an unlabeled graphic.
 
Using the Windows Touch Keyboard
JAWS offers full support for the Windows touch keyboard, enabling you to write documents, email messages, and fill out forms on the Internet right on your device's touch screen if you do not have access to a physical keyboard. While a regular keyboard is still recommended for writing lengthy documents or performing complex editing tasks, using the Touch keyboard is convenient for writing a quick note, composing or replying to an email, or filling out a form on a web site.
 
To activate the Touch Keyboard, perform a four-finger swipe down then up. JAWS announces "opened Touch Keyboard" and plays an ascending sound. Once enabled, the keyboard is positioned in the bottom part of the screen and each key is represented by a button. Use flick gestures to move to each key, or drag your finger around the screen to explore and locate keys. While exploring, JAWS plays a unique set of sounds to alert you when you enter or leave the area of the screen containing the touch keyboard. Once you become familliar with the touch keyboard layout, you can tap at the location of each key.
 
To close the touch keyboard, perform another four-finger swipe down then up. JAWS announces "closed touch keyboard" and plays a descending sound.
 
Note: To change how JAWS notifies you when the touch keyboard opens and closes, open Settings Center and navigate to the Touch Keyboard Notification option. Use the SPACEBAR to cycle through the available options.
 
Typing Mode
When typing, there are two modes available:
 
Touch Typing: A key is typed when the finger is lifted from any of the keyboard buttons, or a split tap is performed on the selected keyboard button. If alternative characters are available for the currrent keyboard button, a split double tap will open a panel of alternative keys related to the selected key. Performing a split double tap on any keyboard button in the alternative characters panel will close the panel.
Standard Typing: A key is typed when a double tap or split tap is performed on the screen after exploring to any of the keyboard buttons. If alternative characters are available for the currrent keyboard button, a triple tap will open a panel of alternative keys related to the selected key. Performing a triple tap on any keyboard button in the alternative characters panel will close the panel.
By default, JAWS uses Touch Typing, which means that a key is typed as soon as the finger is lifted from a keyboard button, or you perform a split tap. To change the typing mode, open Settings Center and navigate to the Touch Typing Mode setting. Use the SPACEBAR to toggle between Standard Typing or Touch Typing.
 
Note: To change how JAWS indicates when the panel of alternative characters opens or closes, open Settings Center and navigate to the Touch Alternative Character Panel Popup Notification option. Use the SPACEBAR to cycle through the available options.
 
Typing Echo
Just like when typing on a physical keyboard, you can configure how much feedback you receive when typing using the Touch Keyboard. To change this, open Settings Center and navigate to the Touch Typing Echo setting. Use the SPACEBAR to cycle through the available options. You may choose either Characters, Words, Both Characters and Words, or None so that JAWS remains silent as you type using the touch keyboard. By default, JAWS ehcos both characters and words as you type.
 
Note: This option allows you to configure the feedback for the touch keyboard separate from the feedback for the physical keyboard. This means you can have JAWS say nothing when using a regular keyboard, but continue to announce both characters and words when using the touch keyboard.
 
JAWS Specific Touch Gestures
The following tables list the available JAWS commands that can be performed using touch gestures:
 
Gestures for Touch Navigation, Text Reading, and Speech Settings
Gesture  Touch Navigation  Text Reading  Speech Settings 
One-finger tap  Speak the element at the current location (continuously move your finger around the screen to explore) Speak the element at the current location (continuously move your finger around the screen to explore) -
Split tap  Speak the character at the current location while exploring, or activate the selected Touch Keyboard button in both Standard and Touch Typing modes Speak the character at the current location while exploring, or activate the selected Touch Keyboard button in both Standard and Touch Typing modes -
Split double tap  Speak the word at the current location while exploring, or open and close the panel of alternative keys related to the selected Touch Keyboard button in Touch Typing mode Speak the word at the current location while exploring, or open and close the panel of alternative keys related to the selected Touch Keyboard button in Touch Typing mode -
Flick right or left  Next or prior element Next or prior character Increase or decrease speech rate
Flick down or up  Next or prior element (of the type previously set by two-finger flick right or left) or changes the value in slider controls Next or prior line (or anywhere that up/down arrow works to move by line) Decrease or increase main volume settings
Two-finger flick right or left  Cycle forward or backward through element navigation types, such as regions, headings, list items, etc. Next or prior word - 
Two-finger flick up  Say current element Prior paragraph (Actually performs a CTRL+UP ARROW) - 
Two-finger flick down  Say all Next paragraph (Actually performs a CTRL+DOWN ARROW) - 
Triple tap  Select or clear an item in a list; decrease value in slider control; open and close the panel of alternative keys related to the selected Touch Keyboard button in Standard Typing mode Toggle text selection, or open and close the panel of alternative keys related to the selected Touch Keyboard button in Standard Typing mode  Toggles touch cursor on/off
Two-finger triple tap  Speak selected text Speak selected text -
Three-finger flick right or left  Performs a TAB or SHIFT+TAB  End or beginning of current line (Actually performs a JAWS END/HOME) - 
Three-finger flick up or down  Cycle between application panes similar to pressing F6 or SHIFT+F6 Beginning or end of text area (Actually performs a CTRL+HOME/END) - 
Four-finger flick up or down  First or last element  Move up or down by page or screen (Actually performs a PAGE UP/DOWN) - 
Four-finger swipe down  - Say All (a single tap anywhere on the screen stops reading) - 
Four-finger swipe down-up  Toggles Windows touch keyboard on/off  Toggles Windows touch keyboard on/off  - 
Four-finger double tap  List gestures for touch navigation List gestures for text reading List gestures for speech settings
 
Gestures for General Windows and JAWS Commands
Gesture  Action 
Double tap  Activate the current element or Touch Keyboard button in Standard Typing mode (Works for both touch navigation and text reading)
Two-finger swipe right-left  Escape (Actually performs ESC for both touch navigation and text reading)
Two-finger swipe up-down  Close application (For both touch navigation and text reading)
Three-finger swipe down-up  Toggle text review window for elements with text names that do not support standard cursor navigation, such as buttons and list items
Two-finger tap  Silence speech
Two-finger double tap  Applications key
Two-finger rotate clockwise  Set next gesture mode
Two-finger rotate counter clockwise  Set prior gesture mode
Three-finger double tap  Toggle speech on/off
Four-finger tap  Display gesture context help
Four-finger triple tap  Gesture practice mode, similar to keyboard help
Four-finger rotate  Passes the next gesture through to Windows
Five-finger tap  JAWS Manager dialog box (If the gesture mode is not already set to touch when this command is used, the mode is set to touch.)
Five-finger double tap  JAWS window (If the gesture mode is not already set to touch when this command is used, the mode is set to touch.)
Five-finger triple tap  Shut down JAWS (If the gesture mode is not already set to touch when this command is used, the mode is set to touch.)
Five-finger rotate  Toggle JAWS gestures off and on
 
See also:
 
JAWS Gesture Settings
 
JAWS Touch Keyboard Settings
 
Using the Touch Cursor
 
 
 
Back
 
 Next
 

Stay safe and take care.  Mike.

----- Original Message -----
From: tim
Sent: Thursday, November 26, 2020 7:36 AM
Subject: Re: [win10] touch interaction

Just looked and it does touch nice on my screen. however, it does take
some learning.
Take a look at jaws help for more info.

On 11/25/2020 7:17 PM, Don H wrote:
> Having been paying for SMA over the past several years I am trying my
> best to learn how to use Jaws as a backup to NVDA. Having been using
> NVDA for the past several years. In NVDA there is a setting to turn on
> and off touch interaction. I am looking for the same ability in Jaws
> 2021. Does Jaws have this ability to turn touch interaction on and off?
> Thanks
>
>
>
>
>
>





Re: Windows 10 password question

Jerry Hogan
 

I know, I was addressing this subject to anyone who will read my post, I know that the person is dead and not breathing and the body is cold, that is all I was just saying.

Jerry

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of chris judge
Sent: Thursday, November 26, 2020 12:33 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows 10 password question

 

Yes but unfortunately this guy is deceased so it’s a bit late to pass this advice on to him. I always give my clients these suggestions. If only they’d pay heed to my suggestions.

 

Chris Judge

JAWS Certified, 2020

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jerry Hogan
Sent: November 26, 2020 1:47 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows 10 password question

 

Like Joseph said, it is wise to give your password to someone you trust in case of emergency, it is important to give your password to someone else for emergency, my wife have my password.  Good luck.

jerry

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jason White via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, November 26, 2020 11:15 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows 10 password question

 

Brian’s advice is correct, with one qualification: if BitLocker encryption was used on the drive, then you won’t be able to read it on another machine without the encryption key.

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, November 26, 2020 at 11:11
To: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@...>
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows 10 password question

Chris,

              No.  Their best bet will be to pull the system drive from the machine and connect it to another as an external drive  After they go through the dance of getting access to the file and folder hierarchy after it's connected, they can access anything on the drive

              This is a good chance to remind people that in this cyber age, if we're doing what we should to protect ourselves with passwords, PINs, etc., that having something in place to pass that information on to either our executor(s) or other loved one(s) upon our passing needs to be in place.  I've had this happen with some of my clients, too.  It makes the process of taking care of affairs that need to be taken care of much more difficult if you don't have that information.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042
The Internet is so big, so powerful and pointless that for some people it is a complete substitute for life.
        ~ Andrew Brown (1938-1994)


Re: Windows 10 password question

chris judge
 

Yes but unfortunately this guy is deceased so it’s a bit late to pass this advice on to him. I always give my clients these suggestions. If only they’d pay heed to my suggestions.

 

Chris Judge

JAWS Certified, 2020

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jerry Hogan
Sent: November 26, 2020 1:47 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows 10 password question

 

Like Joseph said, it is wise to give your password to someone you trust in case of emergency, it is important to give your password to someone else for emergency, my wife have my password.  Good luck.

jerry

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jason White via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, November 26, 2020 11:15 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows 10 password question

 

Brian’s advice is correct, with one qualification: if BitLocker encryption was used on the drive, then you won’t be able to read it on another machine without the encryption key.

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, November 26, 2020 at 11:11
To: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@...>
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows 10 password question

Chris,

              No.  Their best bet will be to pull the system drive from the machine and connect it to another as an external drive  After they go through the dance of getting access to the file and folder hierarchy after it's connected, they can access anything on the drive

              This is a good chance to remind people that in this cyber age, if we're doing what we should to protect ourselves with passwords, PINs, etc., that having something in place to pass that information on to either our executor(s) or other loved one(s) upon our passing needs to be in place.  I've had this happen with some of my clients, too.  It makes the process of taking care of affairs that need to be taken care of much more difficult if you don't have that information.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042
The Internet is so big, so powerful and pointless that for some people it is a complete substitute for life.
        ~ Andrew Brown (1938-1994)


Re: Windows 10 password question

chris judge
 

No worries there,

 

Chris Judge

JAWS Certified, 2020

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jason White via groups.io
Sent: November 26, 2020 1:15 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows 10 password question

 

Brian’s advice is correct, with one qualification: if BitLocker encryption was used on the drive, then you won’t be able to read it on another machine without the encryption key.

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, November 26, 2020 at 11:11
To: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@...>
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows 10 password question

Chris,

              No.  Their best bet will be to pull the system drive from the machine and connect it to another as an external drive  After they go through the dance of getting access to the file and folder hierarchy after it's connected, they can access anything on the drive

              This is a good chance to remind people that in this cyber age, if we're doing what we should to protect ourselves with passwords, PINs, etc., that having something in place to pass that information on to either our executor(s) or other loved one(s) upon our passing needs to be in place.  I've had this happen with some of my clients, too.  It makes the process of taking care of affairs that need to be taken care of much more difficult if you don't have that information.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042
The Internet is so big, so powerful and pointless that for some people it is a complete substitute for life.
        ~ Andrew Brown (1938-1994)


Re: Windows 10 password question

chris judge
 

Oh believe me I know. If I had a nickel for every time I had a client forget a password, I’d never have to work another day.

 

Thanks, I’ll pass this on.

 

Chris Judge

JAWS Certified, 2020

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: November 26, 2020 12:12 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows 10 password question

 

Chris,

              No.  Their best bet will be to pull the system drive from the machine and connect it to another as an external drive.  After they go through the dance of getting access to the file and folder hierarchy after it's connected, they can access anything on the drive.

              This is a good chance to remind people that in this cyber age, if we're doing what we should to protect ourselves with passwords, PINs, etc., that having something in place to pass that information on to either our executor(s) or other loved one(s) upon our passing needs to be in place.  I've had this happen with some of my clients, too.  It makes the process of taking care of affairs that need to be taken care of much more difficult if you don't have that information.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042
The Internet is so big, so powerful and pointless that for some people it is a complete substitute for life.
        ~ Andrew Brown (1938-1994)


Re: Home Machines And Network Setup

Hicks Steven (CORNWALL IT SERVICES)
 

You are right on the money once more Brian, my network was set to publick.

 

Thanks so much again, check the other machine now.

 

 

 

 

 

Steven Hicks

Servicedesk 2 Team Leader

Tel:  01209 318620.

Mobile:  07393 792548.

EMail:  Steven.Hicks@...

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: 26 November 2020 16:05
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Home Machines And Network Setup

 

You need to make sure that both computers are not only on the same WiFi network, but also that each designates that network as Private.

Settings, Network & Internet, WiFi Pane, then activate the button that is your network name.  In the dialog that comes up, under the Network Profile section make sure that the radio button for Private is selected on each machine.  That automatically configures the firewall such that the two machines can see each other (they're discoverable) when connected to that network.

If Public is chosen the machine will do its best to wall itself off from all other machines on that network.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042
The Internet is so big, so powerful and pointless that for some people it is a complete substitute for life.
        ~ Andrew Brown (1938-1994)

 

 

This message originated from outside of NHSmail. Please do not click links or open attachments unless you recognise the sender and know the content is safe.

 



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Re: Home Machines And Network Setup

Hicks Steven (CORNWALL IT SERVICES)
 

Thanks so much brian, that is really helpful.

That may explain why the streeming from my t.v. tuner doesn’t work.

 

 

 

 

 

Steven Hicks

Servicedesk 2 Team Leader

Tel:  01209 318620.

Mobile:  07393 792548.

EMail:  Steven.Hicks@...

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: 26 November 2020 16:05
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Home Machines And Network Setup

 

You need to make sure that both computers are not only on the same WiFi network, but also that each designates that network as Private.

Settings, Network & Internet, WiFi Pane, then activate the button that is your network name.  In the dialog that comes up, under the Network Profile section make sure that the radio button for Private is selected on each machine.  That automatically configures the firewall such that the two machines can see each other (they're discoverable) when connected to that network.

If Public is chosen the machine will do its best to wall itself off from all other machines on that network.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042
The Internet is so big, so powerful and pointless that for some people it is a complete substitute for life.
        ~ Andrew Brown (1938-1994)

 

 

This message originated from outside of NHSmail. Please do not click links or open attachments unless you recognise the sender and know the content is safe.

 



********************************************************************************************************************

This message may contain confidential information. If you are not the intended recipient please inform the
sender that you have received the message in error before deleting it.
Please do not disclose, copy or distribute information in this e-mail or take any action in relation to its contents. To do so is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful. Thank you for your co-operation.

NHSmail is the secure email and directory service available for all NHS staff in England and Scotland. NHSmail is approved for exchanging patient data and other sensitive information with NHSmail and other accredited email services.

For more information and to find out how you can switch, https://portal.nhs.net/help/joiningnhsmail


Re: Microsoft Text Input Application

Mike B
 


Howdy,
 
I went into, services.msc, and disabled it there.  But, I did learn a few things about using the old style task manager and msconfig, which I had forgotten I had installed to experiment with.  In the old style task manager this TextInput feature shows on the Applications tab, which there isn't an applications tab in the default task manager, and I couldn't end the task using the old style task manager.  Thanks again for getting me pointed to the correct place to shut it down.

Stay safe and take care.  Mike.

----- Original Message -----
From: Joseph Lee
Sent: Thursday, November 26, 2020 8:27 AM
Subject: Re: [win10] Microsoft Text Input Application

Hi,

I doubt that can change things.

What Mike wrote confirms what I thought was happening: JAWS Key+F10 will present a list of top-level windows, which is quite an interesting approach to show a list of tasks. But there are more effective ways to show list of tasks (or in some cases, top-level windows), such as:

  • Task View: Windows+Tab (since Version 1803, it can show you recent activities)
  • Task switching: Alt+Tab (made more useful or somewhat confusing with Version 20H2 thanks to the ability to switch between Edge tabs)
  • Static task switching: Control+Alt+Tab (you can either press this key combination once or hold down Control+Alt and press Tab repeatedly to cycle between apps)

Cheers,

Joseph


Re: Windows 10 password question

Jerry Hogan
 

Like Joseph said, it is wise to give your password to someone you trust in case of emergency, it is important to give your password to someone else for emergency, my wife have my password.  Good luck.

jerry

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jason White via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, November 26, 2020 11:15 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows 10 password question

 

Brian’s advice is correct, with one qualification: if BitLocker encryption was used on the drive, then you won’t be able to read it on another machine without the encryption key.

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, November 26, 2020 at 11:11
To: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@...>
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows 10 password question

Chris,

              No.  Their best bet will be to pull the system drive from the machine and connect it to another as an external drive  After they go through the dance of getting access to the file and folder hierarchy after it's connected, they can access anything on the drive

              This is a good chance to remind people that in this cyber age, if we're doing what we should to protect ourselves with passwords, PINs, etc., that having something in place to pass that information on to either our executor(s) or other loved one(s) upon our passing needs to be in place.  I've had this happen with some of my clients, too.  It makes the process of taking care of affairs that need to be taken care of much more difficult if you don't have that information.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042
The Internet is so big, so powerful and pointless that for some people it is a complete substitute for life.
        ~ Andrew Brown (1938-1994)


Re: Windows 10 password question

Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

On Thu, Nov 26, 2020 at 12:15 PM, Jason White wrote:
if BitLocker encryption was used on the drive, then you won’t be able to read it on another machine without the encryption key.
-
Absolutely true.  And, in a case like this, makes you doubly doomed.

I thank heaven that BitLocker is not on by default and very few know about it and enable it.  The current frenzy for encrypting everything is just that, a frenzy, and causes all kinds of heartache.  Any sort of malfunction on an encrypted drive almost ensures that any easy recovery of the data will be impossible, and even extremely difficult and expensive recovery may prove impossible.

There is no home user that I know of that needs all data on an entire drive encrypted.  Encrypt files, if they're sensitive, or folders when necessary, but leave the drives as a whole alone unless you are dealing with NSA/CIA level secrets for all you do.  One of my favorite quotations regarding cybersecurity:

In the computer security field, we often say that one doesn't need Fort Knox to safeguard a broken bicycle.

     ~ Glenn Glazer, M.S. ’07 UCLA Security & Cryptography,

        April 25, 2019, in Message on Groups.io Beta Group

Most of our data, which should be backed up to begin with, would fall into the "broken bicycle" category.  No one wants to steal my 20 years of pictures, or my old letters, or most of what's on my computer.  It has no value on any market, except perhaps the blackmail market, and in that case both the data that could be used as well as that market is exceedingly small indeed!

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042
The Internet is so big, so powerful and pointless that for some people it is a complete substitute for life.
        ~ Andrew Brown (1938-1994)


Re: Home Machines And Network Setup

Jason White
 

In my experience, firewalls generally don’t block the packets used by ping, so if you can’t ping one machine from the other, you probably have network issues. Are you sure you’re using the correct IP addresses? Does your router supply local DNS resolution for the devices on the internal network?

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, November 26, 2020 at 09:32
To: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io>
Subject: [win10] Home Machines And Network Setup

Hi friends,

 

I Wonder if someone can help with some general advice please?

I Have my main laptop here and I have a Surface Pro set up on my home wireless as well.

I Would like to be able to rdp from my main laptop to the surface Pro for testing etc.

At the moment, I can’t even ping the Surface pro.

My main laptop is running Microsoft Windows 10 Home.

The Surface Pro is running Microsoft Windows 10 Professional.

Is it something that I need to do on the network e.g. set up the firewall or something to allow one machine to connect to the other?

 

 

 

 

 

Steven Hicks

Servicedesk 2 Team Leader

Tel:  01209 318620.

Mobile:  07393 792548.

EMail:  Steven.Hicks@...

 



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Re: Windows 10 password question

Jason White
 

Brian’s advice is correct, with one qualification: if BitLocker encryption was used on the drive, then you won’t be able to read it on another machine without the encryption key.

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io>
Date: Thursday, November 26, 2020 at 11:11
To: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@...>
Subject: Re: [win10] Windows 10 password question

Chris,

              No.  Their best bet will be to pull the system drive from the machine and connect it to another as an external drive  After they go through the dance of getting access to the file and folder hierarchy after it's connected, they can access anything on the drive

              This is a good chance to remind people that in this cyber age, if we're doing what we should to protect ourselves with passwords, PINs, etc., that having something in place to pass that information on to either our executor(s) or other loved one(s) upon our passing needs to be in place.  I've had this happen with some of my clients, too.  It makes the process of taking care of affairs that need to be taken care of much more difficult if you don't have that information.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042
The Internet is so big, so powerful and pointless that for some people it is a complete substitute for life.
        ~ Andrew Brown (1938-1994)


Re: Microsoft Text Input Application

 

Hi,

I doubt that can change things.

What Mike wrote confirms what I thought was happening: JAWS Key+F10 will present a list of top-level windows, which is quite an interesting approach to show a list of tasks. But there are more effective ways to show list of tasks (or in some cases, top-level windows), such as:

  • Task View: Windows+Tab (since Version 1803, it can show you recent activities)
  • Task switching: Alt+Tab (made more useful or somewhat confusing with Version 20H2 thanks to the ability to switch between Edge tabs)
  • Static task switching: Control+Alt+Tab (you can either press this key combination once or hold down Control+Alt and press Tab repeatedly to cycle between apps)

Cheers,

Joseph


Re: Windows 10 password question

Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

Chris,

              No.  Their best bet will be to pull the system drive from the machine and connect it to another as an external drive.  After they go through the dance of getting access to the file and folder hierarchy after it's connected, they can access anything on the drive.

              This is a good chance to remind people that in this cyber age, if we're doing what we should to protect ourselves with passwords, PINs, etc., that having something in place to pass that information on to either our executor(s) or other loved one(s) upon our passing needs to be in place.  I've had this happen with some of my clients, too.  It makes the process of taking care of affairs that need to be taken care of much more difficult if you don't have that information.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042
The Internet is so big, so powerful and pointless that for some people it is a complete substitute for life.
        ~ Andrew Brown (1938-1994)


Re: Home Machines And Network Setup

Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

You need to make sure that both computers are not only on the same WiFi network, but also that each designates that network as Private.

Settings, Network & Internet, WiFi Pane, then activate the button that is your network name.  In the dialog that comes up, under the Network Profile section make sure that the radio button for Private is selected on each machine.  That automatically configures the firewall such that the two machines can see each other (they're discoverable) when connected to that network.

If Public is chosen the machine will do its best to wall itself off from all other machines on that network.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042
The Internet is so big, so powerful and pointless that for some people it is a complete substitute for life.
        ~ Andrew Brown (1938-1994)


Re: touch interaction

tim
 

Just looked and it does touch nice on my screen. however, it does take some learning.
Take a look at jaws help for more info.

On 11/25/2020 7:17 PM, Don H wrote:
Having been paying for SMA over the past several years I am trying my best to learn how to use Jaws as a backup to NVDA.  Having been using NVDA for the past several years.  In NVDA there is a setting to turn on and off touch interaction.  I am looking for the same ability in Jaws 2021.  Does Jaws have this ability to turn touch interaction on and off?
Thanks


Home Machines And Network Setup

Hicks Steven (CORNWALL IT SERVICES)
 

Hi friends,

 

I Wonder if someone can help with some general advice please?

I Have my main laptop here and I have a Surface Pro set up on my home wireless as well.

I Would like to be able to rdp from my main laptop to the surface Pro for testing etc.

At the moment, I can’t even ping the Surface pro.

My main laptop is running Microsoft Windows 10 Home.

The Surface Pro is running Microsoft Windows 10 Professional.

Is it something that I need to do on the network e.g. set up the firewall or something to allow one machine to connect to the other?

 

 

 

 

 

Steven Hicks

Servicedesk 2 Team Leader

Tel:  01209 318620.

Mobile:  07393 792548.

EMail:  Steven.Hicks@...

 



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This message may contain confidential information. If you are not the intended recipient please inform the
sender that you have received the message in error before deleting it.
Please do not disclose, copy or distribute information in this e-mail or take any action in relation to its contents. To do so is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful. Thank you for your co-operation.

NHSmail is the secure email and directory service available for all NHS staff in England and Scotland. NHSmail is approved for exchanging patient data and other sensitive information with NHSmail and other accredited email services.

For more information and to find out how you can switch, https://portal.nhs.net/help/joiningnhsmail


Re: Microsoft Text Input Application

Mike B
 


Good morning Joseph,
 
Thank you very much.  That took care of the Textinputhost but, it still reports, running disabled.  It's not showing in the Jaws task list either.  Is there a way to totally disable it?  Thanks again.

Stay safe and take care.  Mike.

----- Original Message -----
From: Joseph Lee
Sent: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 6:41 PM
Subject: Re: [win10] Microsoft Text Input Application

Hi,

Possibly, but I'm doubtful that it is Sharky (JAWS 2021 and later). Microsoft Text Input Application is really modern keyboard (introduced in Version 1709 in limited capacity, took on the current form with Version 1903). Try:

  1. Open Task Manager.
  2. Switch to "more details" if it isn't set as such.
  3. Go to Details tab.
  4. Kill "textinputhost.exe".
  5. Close Task Manager and open up JAWS task list (JAWS Key+F10) and see if the text input app window shows up. If it doesn't, chances are that it is modern keyboard (and would confirm something I felt about JAWS task list for a while).

Cheers,

Joseph


Windows 10 password question

chris judge
 

Good morning everyone.

 

Unfortunately one of our clients passed away yesterday. He had his computer protected with a password. His family are trying to access the computer as there are some photos on it they wish to get. Does anyone have a suggestion for getting around this?

 

Cheers.

 

Chris Judge

JAWS Certified, 2020

 


Re: Microsoft Text Input Application

 

Hi,

Possibly, but I'm doubtful that it is Sharky (JAWS 2021 and later). Microsoft Text Input Application is really modern keyboard (introduced in Version 1709 in limited capacity, took on the current form with Version 1903). Try:

  1. Open Task Manager.
  2. Switch to "more details" if it isn't set as such.
  3. Go to Details tab.
  4. Kill "textinputhost.exe".
  5. Close Task Manager and open up JAWS task list (JAWS Key+F10) and see if the text input app window shows up. If it doesn't, chances are that it is modern keyboard (and would confirm something I felt about JAWS task list for a while).

Cheers,

Joseph

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