Date   

Is there a way that I can tell the date a file was first placed in my computer, even if it's moved to another location or drive?

Kevin Minor
 

Hi.

 

To be honest, this is something I’m curious about. I get lots of music from a service, and I’d like to know when I got it. I am using details view, and I have the date created as my reference. Problem with that is if I move the file to another drive, the date changes to the time it was moved. Is there another date option that will work better?

 

Thanks in advance for any ideas.

 

Kevin and Jilly the flying doggie


Re: What's the biggest M.2 SSD that I can get for my Asus Zenbook laptop?

Hamit Campos
 

Ah so they are different then. My bad. I knew they were in a way but couldn't remember well enough. So to be clear and thanks for reminding me Brian. All I was origenaly saying is that as far as I had remembered it was a connector or memory difference but for the person's need I couldn't really explain because and perhaps I misread the message I thought they thought M.2 NV ME was a type of SSD if you will. I guess then to an extent it is. Thanks for the reminder. I use to really be up on these things since I watched PC Perspective and they talk a lot about these things as it's a PC hardware show.

On 10/16/2020 12:04 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 11:46 AM, Hamit Campos wrote:
M.2 is a type of something. I think is it the memory? or the connection. It's not the SSD itself though.
-
You cannot separate the two.   An M.2 NVME SSD does, indeed, look more like a memory stick than a conventional disc drive, but that was simply an evolution in design.  SATA SSDs were developed so that you could "plug n' play" replace existing drives with SSDs.

I'm not saying that there are no differences, because there are, and M.2 NVME has significantly faster throughput.

But they're both solid state drives.  I'd say, by way of analogy, the difference between a SATA SSD and M.2 NVME SSD is akin to the difference between a 5200 RPM HDD and a 7200 RPM HDD.  Both SSD technologies are, at their heart, solid state devices just like both of the speeds of HDDs are, at their heart, spinning platter drives.

P.S.:  The drives I recently had fail were both SATA-type SSDs, Not M.2 NVME
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041

A man's worst difficulties begin when he is able to do as he likes.

       ~ Thomas H. Huxley (1876)


Re: What's the biggest M.2 SSD that I can get for my Asus Zenbook laptop?

Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 11:46 AM, Hamit Campos wrote:
M.2 is a type of something. I think is it the memory? or the connection. It's not the SSD itself though.
-
You cannot separate the two.   An M.2 NVME SSD does, indeed, look more like a memory stick than a conventional disc drive, but that was simply an evolution in design.  SATA SSDs were developed so that you could "plug n' play" replace existing drives with SSDs.

I'm not saying that there are no differences, because there are, and M.2 NVME has significantly faster throughput.

But they're both solid state drives.  I'd say, by way of analogy, the difference between a SATA SSD and M.2 NVME SSD is akin to the difference between a 5200 RPM HDD and a 7200 RPM HDD.  Both SSD technologies are, at their heart, solid state devices just like both of the speeds of HDDs are, at their heart, spinning platter drives.

P.S.:  The drives I recently had fail were both SATA-type SSDs, Not M.2 NVME
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041

A man's worst difficulties begin when he is able to do as he likes.

       ~ Thomas H. Huxley (1876)


Re: What's the biggest M.2 SSD that I can get for my Asus Zenbook laptop?

Hamit Campos
 

M.2 is a type of something. I think is it the memory? or the connection. It's not the SSD itself though.

On 10/16/2020 11:41 AM, Mike Capelle wrote:

Is m.2 better than a ssd

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Friday, October 16, 2020 10:01 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] What's the biggest M.2 SSD that I can get for my Asus Zenbook laptop?

 

On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 09:07 AM, valiant8086 wrote:

I haven't failed a single ssd yet

-
Just as a data point to the readership, I had both Mushkin 1TB SSDs (I exchanged for the first one that failed, thinking it had to be a fluke) fail on me after less than 5 days of use, each.

I will admit that this is not characteristic of SSDs as a class, but there it is.  And when they go, they're gone.  They are also much harder, and more expensive, to recover data from as well.  As one of the techs who does data recovery for his living on another forum I haunt said of SSDs, "And less likely recoverable should they fail."

So the upshot here is, like it always is:  backup, backup, backup!!
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041

A man's worst difficulties begin when he is able to do as he likes.

       ~ Thomas H. Huxley (1876)


Re: What's the biggest M.2 SSD that I can get for my Asus Zenbook laptop?

Mike Capelle <mcap@...>
 

Is m.2 better than a ssd

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Friday, October 16, 2020 10:01 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] What's the biggest M.2 SSD that I can get for my Asus Zenbook laptop?

 

On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 09:07 AM, valiant8086 wrote:

I haven't failed a single ssd yet

-
Just as a data point to the readership, I had both Mushkin 1TB SSDs (I exchanged for the first one that failed, thinking it had to be a fluke) fail on me after less than 5 days of use, each.

I will admit that this is not characteristic of SSDs as a class, but there it is.  And when they go, they're gone.  They are also much harder, and more expensive, to recover data from as well.  As one of the techs who does data recovery for his living on another forum I haunt said of SSDs, "And less likely recoverable should they fail."

So the upshot here is, like it always is:  backup, backup, backup!!
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041

A man's worst difficulties begin when he is able to do as he likes.

       ~ Thomas H. Huxley (1876)


Re: What's the biggest M.2 SSD that I can get for my Asus Zenbook laptop?

Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 09:07 AM, valiant8086 wrote:
I haven't failed a single ssd yet
-
Just as a data point to the readership, I had both Mushkin 1TB SSDs (I exchanged for the first one that failed, thinking it had to be a fluke) fail on me after less than 5 days of use, each.

I will admit that this is not characteristic of SSDs as a class, but there it is.  And when they go, they're gone.  They are also much harder, and more expensive, to recover data from as well.  As one of the techs who does data recovery for his living on another forum I haunt said of SSDs, "And less likely recoverable should they fail."

So the upshot here is, like it always is:  backup, backup, backup!!
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041

A man's worst difficulties begin when he is able to do as he likes.

       ~ Thomas H. Huxley (1876)


Re: Sharing audio from phone to computer (version 2004 only)

Hamit Campos
 

h yeah you're right Steve. How ever any modern desktop for better or worse will have 1. I say for better or worse because sometimes these for what ever reason aren't so good and you loose signel too easely.

On 10/16/2020 10:38 AM, Steve Dresser via groups.io wrote:
Simon,

At the risk of stating the obvious, this only works if your machine has a Bluetooth receiver, which many desktops do not. I'd hate to see someone download and install the software only to find that it didn't do anything.

Steve

-----Original Message-----
From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Simon Jaeger
Sent: October 16, 2020 00:06
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: [win10] Sharing audio from phone to computer (version 2004 only)

Hi all,

I got very bored yesterday and decided to pair my phone to my laptop to see what would happen. Not long after, I noticed a device in the recording tab of sound properties with the following name:

Line; Simon's iPhone SE A2DP SNK


A2DP is a common Bluetooth protocol used for stereo audio; it's what many headsets and speakers still use today. The fact I had a recording device named after my iPhone suggested that it would let me stream audio from my phone to the computer, somehow. I tried going to the context menu and hitting connect, which is a thing you can do with some Bluetooth devices; unfortunately this didn't work. After a bit of googling, I found that you have to install a third-party app to make this happen, though i'm not certain why. it's called Bluetooth Audio Receiver, and you can get it from the Microsoft store.


So, the steps are as follows:

1. Pair your phone with your computer (you can initiate this from either the phone or computer).

2. Download Bluetooth Audio Receiver.

3. Open Bluetooth Audio Receiver, press enter on your device in the list, and find the "open connection" button.


That's it! Your phone audio should now come through the computer.
Unfortunately this does not include phone calls, but it does include
system sounds, screen-readers, and any audio you decide to play on the
phone, such as Spotify, books, or podcasts. I think this is pretty
brilliant and I've been so much more attentive to my phone since
discovering it.


Interestingly, opening a connection from Bluetooth Audio Receiver seems
to do two things:

1. It does whatever black magic makes the Bluetooth audio connnection
work properly.

2. It enables "listen to this device" on the A2DP audio device I
discussed earlier, setting it to play back through the default audio
device in Windows.


If you're still paying attention this far in and you haven't picked up
on it already, there's one final bonus: Your phone audio is actually
sent through an input device on Windows. Not only can it be sent through
your default soundcard; it can also be recorded. If you have any content
on your iPhone that you'd like to record onto the computer, this is a
rough but effective way to do it. Just pair the phone and open the
connection as described above, set your recording app on Windows to
record from the A2DP device, and play the audio from your phone. I could
see this being useful for app and game demonstrations and so much more.


Let me know if you have questions/comments. It might help if you CC my
address; I don't always see list mail.


-Simon











Re: Optional updates?

Don H
 

For a couple of weeks now I have optional updates showing driver updates.  There is one for a keyboard driver that I select to go ahead and install it.  When I click install it says checking for updates and finds none.  The optional driver is still there.

On 10/16/2020 9:46 AM, Roger Stewart wrote:
I'm still getting a View Optional Updates when I check the status of updates.  I thought that should have gone away with this month's cumulative update.  I usually never check or install optional updates just for that reason--they'll be installed with the next cumulative update.  I'm just wondering what's going on here.


Roger








Re: Optional updates?

Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
 

Optional updates are completely separate from cumulative (or feature) updates and are exactly what the label states:  Optional

These days, the majority of the Optional updates appear to be driver updates, and these are often, sadly, out of date.  Just ignore them.  
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041

A man's worst difficulties begin when he is able to do as he likes.

       ~ Thomas H. Huxley (1876)


Optional updates?

Roger Stewart
 

I'm still getting a View Optional Updates when I check the status of updates.  I thought that should have gone away with this month's cumulative update.  I usually never check or install optional updates just for that reason--they'll be installed with the next cumulative update.  I'm just wondering what's going on here.


Roger


Re: Sharing audio from phone to computer (version 2004 only)

Steve Dresser
 

Simon,

At the risk of stating the obvious, this only works if your machine has a Bluetooth receiver, which many desktops do not. I'd hate to see someone download and install the software only to find that it didn't do anything.

Steve

-----Original Message-----
From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of Simon Jaeger
Sent: October 16, 2020 00:06
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: [win10] Sharing audio from phone to computer (version 2004 only)

Hi all,

I got very bored yesterday and decided to pair my phone to my laptop to see what would happen. Not long after, I noticed a device in the recording tab of sound properties with the following name:

Line; Simon's iPhone SE A2DP SNK


A2DP is a common Bluetooth protocol used for stereo audio; it's what many headsets and speakers still use today. The fact I had a recording device named after my iPhone suggested that it would let me stream audio from my phone to the computer, somehow. I tried going to the context menu and hitting connect, which is a thing you can do with some Bluetooth devices; unfortunately this didn't work. After a bit of googling, I found that you have to install a third-party app to make this happen, though i'm not certain why. it's called Bluetooth Audio Receiver, and you can get it from the Microsoft store.


So, the steps are as follows:

1. Pair your phone with your computer (you can initiate this from either the phone or computer).

2. Download Bluetooth Audio Receiver.

3. Open Bluetooth Audio Receiver, press enter on your device in the list, and find the "open connection" button.


That's it! Your phone audio should now come through the computer.
Unfortunately this does not include phone calls, but it does include
system sounds, screen-readers, and any audio you decide to play on the
phone, such as Spotify, books, or podcasts. I think this is pretty
brilliant and I've been so much more attentive to my phone since
discovering it.


Interestingly, opening a connection from Bluetooth Audio Receiver seems
to do two things:

1. It does whatever black magic makes the Bluetooth audio connnection
work properly.

2. It enables "listen to this device" on the A2DP audio device I
discussed earlier, setting it to play back through the default audio
device in Windows.


If you're still paying attention this far in and you haven't picked up
on it already, there's one final bonus: Your phone audio is actually
sent through an input device on Windows. Not only can it be sent through
your default soundcard; it can also be recorded. If you have any content
on your iPhone that you'd like to record onto the computer, this is a
rough but effective way to do it. Just pair the phone and open the
connection as described above, set your recording app on Windows to
record from the A2DP device, and play the audio from your phone. I could
see this being useful for app and game demonstrations and so much more.


Let me know if you have questions/comments. It might help if you CC my
address; I don't always see list mail.


-Simon


Re: more questions about upgrading.

Mike Capelle <mcap@...>
 

I like vantage.

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io <win10@win10.groups.io> On Behalf Of valiant8086
Sent: Friday, October 16, 2020 7:16 AM
To: win10@win10.groups.io; win10@groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] more questions about upgrading.

 

Hi.

 

You should let Vantage handle it. Between it and Windows update you should be golden. A recent update form Windows Update caused my Thinkpad T480s to run hot all the time and only get about 3 hours on battery. I reinstalled windows fresh and that solved it for about 3 weeks until windows update broke it again, having never installed vantage in the first place, so then I knew to blame windows update not vantage. So about 3 weeks of putting up with it, I gave up and installed vantage and checked for updates and it got some, solving the problem. it runs almost uncomfortably cold now and gets about 8 hours on battery active use.

 

That isn't to say don't let windows update do its thing, just my own experience and I won't be stopping windows update from doing its thing at this point.

 

Cheers:
Aaron Spears, AKA Valiant8086 General Partner at Valiant Galaxy Associates "we make (VERY GOOD AUDIOGAMES) for the blind comunity" http://valiantGalaxy.com

On 10/15/2020 11:12 PM, Mike Capelle wrote:

Hello, my Lenovo has drivers for my devices for win 10 2004 directly on there site, so, if I upgrade, wont vantage pick them up, and install them? Or should I manually downlload all of them, and install them? Or will they be installed when I do the upgrade?


Re: re how to change the media function keys to regular f function keys on windows 10 home on a laptop in windows 10 home with a screenreader like narrator or NVDA

valiant8086
 

Hi.


Toshiba you may have a Toshiba HW utility, that feature should be available therein. Look for hw utility in the start menu.



Cheers:
Aaron Spears, AKA Valiant8086 General Partner at Valiant Galaxy Associates "we make (VERY GOOD AUDIOGAMES) for the blind comunity" http://valiantGalaxy.com
On 9/28/2020 12:28 AM, g melconian wrote:

Hello I don’t know how I got some kind of  update on  an old Toshiba laptop on windows 10 and my function keys  have reverted back to media function keys  instead of the regular f function keys.how do I fix this with a screenreader  like narrator or NVDA. Please ccan some one helhlp me out in reverting   the process back from the media function keys to  the regular f function keys.


Re: What's the biggest M.2 SSD that I can get for my Asus Zenbook laptop?

valiant8086
 

Hi.


Knock on wood (ouch my head), I haven't failed a single ssd yet, but I have failed an hdd though granted it was a Maxtor Diamond so yeah why not.


For Hitachi, I can attest to their reliability, I have one that hasn't been necessarily gently used, is a 1 tb 7200 rpm travelstar 2.5 inch. I originally used it for the OS drive on a bearbones build of a nettop or, if you will, htpc style desktop machine, but it used an Atom d2550 board. I gave it 4 gb of ram, but it ran Windows 10 for part of the time and I imagine the swap file may have given the hitachi a bit of a workout. Later I bought an intel NUC and sold the original nettop after installing a small ssd in it. That machine is still in active use today as more or less a file server, with a really big external hdd plugged into one of its USB 3 ports.


The NUC I bought was a 6th gen tall version, meaning it had space for my Hitachi. I installed it to use as data storage, with the OS running off of the internal 128 gb m.2 ssd.


At about the 10 month mark we got a really vicious electrical storm that saw a lightning strike hit something important, killing power for a couple of days and telephone for a little over a week. A neighbor's electric box exploded, the local telephone box got completely gutted and they actually never did get it back to completely normal, my dsl uploads slower than it did which wasn't good anyway. It didn't smoke anything in our house, but my dsl modem failed and my Intel NUC also failed, as did a Peavey PV6 mixing board that was plugged via USB into the NUC. Our garage door opener of all things failed, so did a coffee maker.


Anyway, I was able to get the NUC replaced, and come to find out that it had a BIOS update that fixed a known issue allowing voltage spikes to ruin the board because the IVR circuit was incorrectly handled or something like that. Well I just pulled out the Hitachi and waited for the new nuc to come. I hoped that Hitachi would still work. Got the new NUC and installed the hitachi in it and it still worked pretty as you please.


The really sad part is that it's nearly full, only about 40 gb free, so that increases its workload some. I recently checked it with Crystal Disk Info and it is nearing the 60,000 hour runtime mark. At this point I'm rather amazed. It's starting to look like I might end up switching away do to storage constraints rather than failure.


So saying, Go Hitachi if you have a choice and you're after an hdd. This one has been in 3 computers one of which got killed by an Electrical strike and is still working at peak efficiency. It runs non stop all day every day and the total runtime in hours can litterally be divided by 24 and get you very close to the number of days it has been since I bought it. I'm so proud of that thing, can you tell? lol


Cheers:
Aaron Spears, AKA Valiant8086 General Partner at Valiant Galaxy Associates "we make (VERY GOOD AUDIOGAMES) for the blind comunity" http://valiantGalaxy.com
On 10/2/2020 1:35 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

On Fri, Oct 2, 2020 at 01:11 PM, Sarah k Alawami wrote:
I would recommend if you can, get a 1tb ssd drive.
-
Which, by pure coincidence, is what I just did.  I had a failing keyboard on my laptop so since I knew I needed to tear it down completely to replace that I got rid of the 2TB HDD, which was well under half way full (and will now become another backup drive once I get an enclosure), and put in a Mushkin 1TB SSD at the same time.  Even a 2TB SSD is within reason price-wise for a lot of people.

I will say, though, for anyone using an SSD that the importance of having backups goes up, way up.  It's not that SSDs are any more failure-prone than HDDs, but if they do fail and you have no backup the current rates for data recovery from an SSD makes HDD data recovery look dirt cheap by comparison.  And HDD recovery isn't dirt cheap to start with.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041

A man's worst difficulties begin when he is able to do as he likes.

       ~ Thomas H. Huxley (1876)


Re: Windows 10 SSD Storage

valiant8086
 

Hi.


And the t480 and t480s machines are easy to work on. I could do it no problem. If you're wanting to increase your storage but don't have the ability to do it, someone you know could probably do it in a few minutes, and it wouldn't cost much time to have it done at worst buy or something. The main thing is will you clone the existing ssd to the new one or just install Win10 fresh from scratch, which is doable with this system by yourself if you're adventurous.


Cheers:
Aaron Spears, AKA Valiant8086 General Partner at Valiant Galaxy Associates "we make (VERY GOOD AUDIOGAMES) for the blind comunity" http://valiantGalaxy.com

On 10/2/2020 1:02 AM, tim wrote:
I got that very same system.
Your  around the same in size as mine. What most forget is the swap and page files that are in the background. They can take 10GB or more easy. Lets not forget 1 drive, states zero, but windows holds the amount you have as used by system. All virtual drives do this.
Now if your looking to replace the drive in it look in devicemanager for the type of drive.
The one in mine is a M.2 NVME 256GB 22/80. The 22/80 is the physical size of the drive. They come in 3 sizes.
I will be fitting it out with either a 1 or 2tb drive.


On 9/30/2020 8:49 PM, mgrossman13@gmail.com wrote:
Windows 10 version 2004

Jaws for Windows 2020

Lenobo T480

16GB RAM

256GB SSD

I recently purchased this refurbished laptop from Lenovo.com . It is a lightweight, thin computer with an excellent keyboard. With 16GB of RAM, it is also quite snappy and responsive with Jaws and NVDA.

Since I received the computer, I have only downloaded copies of NVDA and Jaws. Otherwise, the computer came pre-installed with Microsoft Office. It does probably have a bunch of Lenovo software as well but it does not appear to have any pre-installed utilities like Norton.

Here’s my question, when I go to Windows Explorer and check the properties of the C drive, it tells me that 45GB of storage has already been used. It is my understanding that Windows 10 takes roughly 15-20GB and Microsoft Office takes another 5-10GB of storage. Does that sound about right? What else could be taking up so much storage? I would like to recover some of that storage. Does anybody have any suggestions for what to do next? I’ve tried a number of Google searches but cannot get to the bottom of this. Any help is appreciated.

Thanks








Re: Sharing audio from phone to computer (version 2004 only)

valiant8086
 

Hi.


I believe this is part of what allows the your phone companion app to let you hear the phone audio, but it can even do phone calls there so.



Cheers:
Aaron Spears, AKA Valiant8086 General Partner at Valiant Galaxy Associates "we make (VERY GOOD AUDIOGAMES) for the blind comunity" http://valiantGalaxy.com

On 10/16/2020 12:05 AM, Simon Jaeger wrote:
Hi all,

I got very bored yesterday and decided to pair my phone to my laptop to see what would happen. Not long after, I noticed a device in the recording tab of sound properties with the following name:

Line; Simon's iPhone SE A2DP SNK


A2DP is a common Bluetooth protocol used for stereo audio; it's what many headsets and speakers still use today. The fact I had a recording device named after my iPhone suggested that it would let me stream audio from my phone to the computer, somehow. I tried going to the context menu and hitting connect, which is a thing you can do with some Bluetooth devices; unfortunately this didn't work. After a bit of googling, I found that you have to install a third-party app to make this happen, though i'm not certain why. it's called Bluetooth Audio Receiver, and you can get it from the Microsoft store.


So, the steps are as follows:

1. Pair your phone with your computer (you can initiate this from either the phone or computer).

2. Download Bluetooth Audio Receiver.

3. Open Bluetooth Audio Receiver, press enter on your device in the list, and find the "open connection" button.


That's it! Your phone audio should now come through the computer. Unfortunately this does not include phone calls, but it does include system sounds, screen-readers, and any audio you decide to play on the phone, such as Spotify, books, or podcasts. I think this is pretty brilliant and I've been so much more attentive to my phone since discovering it.


Interestingly, opening a connection from Bluetooth Audio Receiver seems to do two things:

1. It does whatever black magic makes the Bluetooth audio connnection work properly.

2. It enables "listen to this device" on the A2DP audio device I discussed earlier, setting it to play back through the default audio device in Windows.


If you're still paying attention this far in and you haven't picked up on it already, there's one final bonus: Your phone audio is actually sent through an input device on Windows. Not only can it be sent through your default soundcard; it can also be recorded. If you have any content on your iPhone that you'd like to record onto the computer, this is a rough but effective way to do it. Just pair the phone and open the connection as described above, set your recording app on Windows to record from the A2DP device, and play the audio from your phone. I could see this being useful for app and game demonstrations and so much more.


Let me know if you have questions/comments. It might help if you CC my address; I don't always see list mail.


-Simon






Re: more questions about upgrading.

valiant8086
 

Hi.


You should let Vantage handle it. Between it and Windows update you should be golden. A recent update form Windows Update caused my Thinkpad T480s to run hot all the time and only get about 3 hours on battery. I reinstalled windows fresh and that solved it for about 3 weeks until windows update broke it again, having never installed vantage in the first place, so then I knew to blame windows update not vantage. So about 3 weeks of putting up with it, I gave up and installed vantage and checked for updates and it got some, solving the problem. it runs almost uncomfortably cold now and gets about 8 hours on battery active use.


That isn't to say don't let windows update do its thing, just my own experience and I won't be stopping windows update from doing its thing at this point.


Cheers:
Aaron Spears, AKA Valiant8086 General Partner at Valiant Galaxy Associates "we make (VERY GOOD AUDIOGAMES) for the blind comunity" http://valiantGalaxy.com
On 10/15/2020 11:12 PM, Mike Capelle wrote:

Hello, my Lenovo has drivers for my devices for win 10 2004 directly on there site, so, if I upgrade, wont vantage pick them up, and install them? Or should I manually downlload all of them, and install them? Or will they be installed when I do the upgrade?


Re: Brave Question

Bill Powers
 

Mike B,

 

Thanks for your directions. I found the steps to set Brave to open to a simple Startpage.com home page. I just like a simple, no frills page to open rather than a bunch of clutter.

 

BP


Re: facing strange issue on the windows 10 settings pannel.

Mário Navarro
 


hi Bill.
you can run the files inside the folder anywhere from the windows explorer.
these files are system files, not JAWS files.
are microsoft visual files.

the files are safe without any virus.
I solved that issue with these files ...
cheers.


Às 20:29 de 15/10/2020, Bill White escreveu:

Hi, Mário. You didn't tell us which folder in which to install the files in this .rar file. Where do you install them?

 

Bill White

billwhite92701@...

 

From: win10@win10.groups.io [mailto:win10@win10.groups.io] On Behalf Of Mário Navarro
Sent: Wednesday, October 14, 2020 11:38 PM
To: win10@win10.groups.io
Subject: Re: [win10] facing strange issue on the windows 10 settings pannel.

 





Hello.
install these 6 files and tell me if it worked.
install one by one.
JAWS needs these files to work in the settings panel.
I had this problem and solved it with these files.

download here.

WE -transfer:

 

https://we.tl/t-E6zaIE72KT

 

cheers.

Às 03:21 de 14/10/2020, writeatme.shankarsai@... escreveu:

Dear group members,

I’m shankar from India.

Recently I got the brand new dell laptop from my office and, after installing the jaws, when I go to the settings panel and pressing left/right arrow keys, screen reader is not reading the options.

The device running the OS Build 19042.546 and jaws 2020 august updates.

Hope someone will suggest me the fix.

 

-- 
A acção pode nem sempre ser felicidade, mas não há felicidade sem acção...
-- 
A acção pode nem sempre ser felicidade, mas não há felicidade sem acção...


Sharing audio from phone to computer (version 2004 only)

Simon Jaeger
 

Hi all,

I got very bored yesterday and decided to pair my phone to my laptop to see what would happen. Not long after, I noticed a device in the recording tab of sound properties with the following name:

Line; Simon's iPhone SE A2DP SNK


A2DP is a common Bluetooth protocol used for stereo audio; it's what many headsets and speakers still use today. The fact I had a recording device named after my iPhone suggested that it would let me stream audio from my phone to the computer, somehow. I tried going to the context menu and hitting connect, which is a thing you can do with some Bluetooth devices; unfortunately this didn't work. After a bit of googling, I found that you have to install a third-party app to make this happen, though i'm not certain why. it's called Bluetooth Audio Receiver, and you can get it from the Microsoft store.


So, the steps are as follows:

1. Pair your phone with your computer (you can initiate this from either the phone or computer).

2. Download Bluetooth Audio Receiver.

3. Open Bluetooth Audio Receiver, press enter on your device in the list, and find the "open connection" button.


That's it! Your phone audio should now come through the computer. Unfortunately this does not include phone calls, but it does include system sounds, screen-readers, and any audio you decide to play on the phone, such as Spotify, books, or podcasts. I think this is pretty brilliant and I've been so much more attentive to my phone since discovering it.


Interestingly, opening a connection from Bluetooth Audio Receiver seems to do two things:

1. It does whatever black magic makes the Bluetooth audio connnection work properly.

2. It enables "listen to this device" on the A2DP audio device I discussed earlier, setting it to play back through the default audio device in Windows.


If you're still paying attention this far in and you haven't picked up on it already, there's one final bonus: Your phone audio is actually sent through an input device on Windows. Not only can it be sent through your default soundcard; it can also be recorded. If you have any content on your iPhone that you'd like to record onto the computer, this is a rough but effective way to do it. Just pair the phone and open the connection as described above, set your recording app on Windows to record from the A2DP device, and play the audio from your phone. I could see this being useful for app and game demonstrations and so much more.


Let me know if you have questions/comments. It might help if you CC my address; I don't always see list mail.


-Simon

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